TIFF 2013: 12 YEARS A SLAVE Wins People’s Choice Award; Midnight Madness Award Goes to WHY DON’T YOU PLAY IN HELL?

by     Posted 320 days ago

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The 2013 Toronto International Film Festival is in the books, and earlier today, TIFF announced this year’s award winners.  The biggest award, the People’s Choice Award, went to Steve McQueen‘s 12 Years a Slave.  The People’s Choice Award is a biggie in the overall awards race since four of the past five winners have gone on to be nominated for Best Picture (Slumdog Millionaire, Precious, The King’s Speech, and Silver Linings Playbook).  While 12 Years a Slave will be sure to dominate awards talk, I hope that people remember that this is a great movie regardless.  It’s a movie that may appeal to Oscar voters, but it’s not Oscar bait.  Click here to read my review.  The film opens on October 18th.

The other People’s Choice Award is in the Midnight Madness lineup, and that went to Sion Sono’s Why Don’t You Play in Hell, and now I’m pretty bummed that I missed that one.  Hit the jump for the full press release.

12-years-a-slave-posterHere’s the press release:

TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCES 2013 AWARD WINNERS

Toronto – The 38th Toronto International Film Festival® today announced its award recipients at a reception at the Intercontinental Hotel in Toronto.

YOUTUBE AWARD FOR BEST CANADIAN SHORT FILM

The winner of the YouTube Award for Best Canadian Short Film goes to Walter Woodman and Patrick Cederberg for Noah. The jury, comprised of writer Rafael Katigbak, writer, director Nathan Morlando and documentary filmmaker Nisha Pahuja, remarked: “This film is a commentary on the ephemeral, disposable, A.D.D. culture that many of us are consumed by and living in. It tells us a story in a way we’ve never seen before and it tells it well. It’s fresh, innovative, and had the remarkable ability to embody complex emotion through the simple gesture of a mouse.” The award offers a $10,000 cash prize. Honourable mentions go to Kevan Funke’s Yellowhead, and Fraser Munden and Neil Rathbone’s The Chaperone 3D.

The Canadian awards below were selected by a jury comprised of Liz Czach, author, Associate Professor in the Department of English and Film Studies at the University of Alberta and a former Festival programmer of Canadian film; Laurence Kardish, film historian, author and Senior Curator Emeritus of Film at the Museum of Modern Art in New York; Martin Katz, feature film producer and founder of Prospero Films; and award-winning director, writer and actor Jacob Tierney.

CITY OF TORONTO + CANADA GOOSE AWARD FOR BEST CANADIAN FEATURE FILM

The City of Toronto + Canada Goose Award for Best Canadian Feature Film goes to Alan Zweig’s When Jews Were Funny. The jury remarked: “For its deeply moving exploration of memory, identity and community and for its coherent and profoundly humourous representation of the personal as universal, the Award for Best Canadian Feature Film goes to Alan Zweig’s documentary When Jews Were Funny.” This award is made possible thanks to the City of Toronto and Canada Goose and comes with a cash prize of $30,000.

“For three generations of extraordinary, honest and courageous performances in Peter Stebbing’s Empire of Dirt, the jury presents a special citation to Jennifer Podemski, Cara Gee and Shay Eyre.”

AWARD FOR BEST CANADIAN FIRST FEATURE FILM

The Award for Best Canadian First Feature Film goes to Shayne Ehman and Seth Scriver’s Asphalt Watches. The jury remarked: “For its ferociously audacious and excitingly original animated road trip across Western Canada that is like no other, the jury recognizes as Best Canadian First Feature Film the breathtakingly inventive Asphalt Watches.” The award carries a prize of $15,000.

“For its technical mastery, polish, sense of fun and ability to scare the pants off us, the jury gives an honourable mention to Afflicted.”

THE PRIZES OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICS (FIPRESCI PRIZES)

The Festival welcomed an international FIPRESCI jury for the 22nd consecutive year. The jury members consist of jury president John Anderson (United States), Robenson Eksiel (Greece), Leslie James (Canada), Namrata Joshi (India), Michael Ranze (Germany) and André Roy (Canada).

Prize of the International Critics (FIPRESCI) for Special Presentations is awarded to Pawel Pawlikowski‘s Ida. The jury remarked: “The prize is awarded to Ida for a layered and humane exploration of issues of religious and personal identity. With its very original, austere yet poetic imagery it brings alive the gravity and grimness of history.”




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