Cinemath: Year-End Report on the 2013 Box Office

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2013 box office stats

I love diving deeper into box office numbers whenever I get the chance.  Ideally, the market would let me wait until March or so, when the final tallies for the holiday fare are locked in.  But the window for year-end coverage is nearly shut, so today I present a report on the 2013 box office for Cinemath.

We look at the domestic and worldwide grosses of 143 wide releases with a few questions in mind: How dominant are sequels and remakes at the top of the charts?  Which movies had greater appeal overseas?  Which releases had “legs,” and kept audiences coming back week after week?  After the jump, I break down the past year in box office by total gross, international earning, staying power, studio, release date, and MPAA rating.  From About Time ($15.3 million) to World War Z ($202.4 million):

This article focuses on the 143 wide releases that played in at least 600 North American theaters at some point during their run.  The data [via Box Office Mojo and The Numbers] is updated through 12/29, the final weekend of 2013.  This unfortunately cuts off several releases in the middle of their runs.  Throughout the article, a (*) denotes movies that were still in theaters as of 12/29.  A (^) highlights December releases that still have significant earning potential in 2014.  All grosses are in millions of dollars unless otherwise noted.

 

Domestic Grosses

The chart below plots domestic gross of all 143 wide releases.  (Note: Javascript must be enabled to view these Google charts.  Hover over a data point to see the title and domestic gross.)

 

As of 12/29, 31 movies grossed at least $100 million domestic.

Rank Title Domestic Studio
1 Iron Man 3 $409.0 Disney
2 The Hunger Games 2* $391.1 Lionsgate
3 Despicable Me 2* $367.7 Universal
4 Man of Steel $291.0 Warner Bros.
5 Monsters University $268.5 Disney
6 Gravity* $254.6 Warner Bros.
7 Frozen* $248.4 Disney
8 Fast and Furious 6 $238.7 Universal
9 Oz The Great and Powerful $234.9 Disney
10 Star Trek Into Darkness $228.8 Paramount
11 Thor: The Dark World* $202.4 Disney
12 World War Z $202.4 Paramount
13 The Hobbit 2*^ $190.3 Warner Bros.
14 The Croods $187.2 Fox
15 The Heat $159.6 Fox
16 We’re the Millers $150.4 Warner Bros.
17 The Great Gatsby $144.8 Warner Bros.
18 The Conjuring $137.4 Warner Bros.
19 Identity Thief $134.5 Universal
20 Grown Ups 2 $133.7 Sony
21 The Wolverine $132.6 Fox
22 G.I. Joe: Retaliation $122.5 Paramount
23 Now You See Me $117.7 Lionsgate
24 Cloudy w/ Chance of Meatballs 2* $116.6 Sony
25 Lee Daniels’ The Butler* $116.1 Weinstein Co.
26 The Hangover 3 $112.2 Warner Bros.
27 Epic $107.5 Fox
28 Captain Phillips* $104.3 Sony
29 Pacific Rim $101.8 Warner Bros.
30 This Is the End $101.5 Sony
31 Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa* $101.3 Paramount

Anchorman 2 should be able to make the list in January.  American Hustle, Saving Mr. Banks, The Wolf of Wall Street, and The Secret Life of Walter Mitty all have a shot.  I also expect The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug to bump Star Trek Into Darkness out of the Top 10 soon.

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire could challenge Iron Man 3 for the top spot.  Either way, a sequel has taken number one on the domestic charts in each of the last 4 years, and 10 of the last 11.  By my count, 38 (26%) of the 2013 wide releases are sequels or remakes/reboots of properties previously seen on film.  The average domestic gross of a sequel/remake is $122 million compared to $49 million for original fare.  The difference is even more pronounced abroad: The average worldwide gross of a sequel/remake is $308, more than times greater than the $102 million for originals.  (Given the emphasis on blockbuster sequels in the summer and original awards contenders over the holidays, this effect may balance out somewhat by February. )

The chart below shows the distribution of sequels/remakes vs original properties in each quintile in the top 100 on the domestic charts.  For instance, the first bar group shows how many original movies and how many sequels/remakes are in the top 20.  The next four bar groups do the same for 21-40, 41-60, 61-80, and 81-100, respectively.

 

The majority of wide releases are still original properties.  However, the sequels/remakes dominate the top of the charts, taking 12 of the top 20 spots and 20 of the top 40.

 

Worldwide Grosses

The chart below plots worldwide gross of all 143 wide releases.

 

As of 12/29, 23 movies grossed at least $300 million worldwide.

Rank Title Worldwide Domestic International
1 Iron Man 3 $1215.4 $409.0 $806.4
2 Despicable Me 2* $918.7 $367.7 $551.0
3 The Hunger Games 2* $795.1 $391.1 $404.0
4 Fast and Furious 6 $788.7 $238.7 $550.0
5 Monsters University $743.6 $268.5 $475.1
6 Man of Steel $662.8 $291.0 $371.8
7 Gravity* $653.3 $254.6 $398.7
8 Thor: The Dark World* $629.4 $202.4 $427.0
9 The Hobbit 2*^ $614.1 $190.3 $423.8
10 The Croods $587.2 $187.2 $400.0
11 World War Z $540.0 $202.4 $337.6
12 Oz The Great and Powerful $493.3 $234.9 $258.4
13 Frozen* $491.9 $248.4 $243.5
14 Star Trek Into Darkness $467.4 $228.8 $238.6
15 The Wolverine $414.9 $132.6 $282.3
16 Pacific Rim $407.6 $101.8 $305.8
17 G.I. Joe: Retaliation $375.7 $122.5 $253.2
18 Now You See Me $351.7 $117.7 $234.0
19 The Hangover 3 $351.0 $112.2 $238.8
20 The Great Gatsby $348.8 $144.8 $204.0
21 The Smurfs 2 $347.5 $71.0 $276.5
22 The Conjuring $316.7 $137.4 $179.3
23 A Good Day to Die Hard $304.6 $67.3 $237.3

The wide releases grossed nearly $10 billion domestically and well over $12.5 billion abroad.  That’s about a 45% domestic/55% international split, but 13 movies grossed over 70% of the worldwide total overseas.

Rank Title %Int International Domestic
1 The Grandmaster 89.7% $57.5 $6.6
2 About Time 80.9% $64.9 $15.3
3 Escape Plan* 79.7% $98.2 $25.0
4 The Smurfs 2 79.6% $276.5 $71.0
5 A Good Day to Die Hard 77.9% $237.3 $67.3
6 Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters 75.3% $170.0 $55.7
7 After Earth 75.2% $183.3 $60.5
8 The Last Stand 75.1% $36.3 $12.1
9 Pacific Rim 75.0% $305.8 $101.8
10 The Counselor* 73.4% $46.8 $16.9
11 Turbo 70.6% $199.5 $83.0
12 Movie 43 70.5% $21.1 $8.8
13 Rush 70.1% $63.3 $26.9

The Hong Kong production The Grandmaster makes sense at the top of the list—the martial arts drama grossed over 70% of its total in China alone.  The UK production About Time also fits the bill.

There are quite a few action movies that arguably disappointed in the States, but likely saved the bottom line overseas.  Escape Plan, A Good Day to Die Hard, Hansel and Gretel: Witch Hunters, After Earth, Pacific Rim.

Click to Page 2 for the breakdown by performance after opening weekend, studio, month of release and MPAA rating.

Page 2




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  • eternalozzie

    I am really trying my hardest to erase the cosmic turd Iron Man 3 from my mind … terrible story line … all the great actors couldn’t save it.

    • Liderc

      Yeah, probably had something to do with not using Rebecca Hall at all and then turning one of the best actors of all time into a joke twist.

    • JJ

      GOD…I hated that movie so so much

  • Lex Walker

    It’s kind of fascinating to see the films that American audiences were lukewarm on and how they jump 3-13 places when you move from domestic to worldwide. Like Pacific Rim, which could get a sequel if they reduce the budget by a quarter, and still make as much worldwide.

  • james

    Notice how the only movies that made more money than man of steel were all sequels? Yeah man of steel bombed… NOT! :)

    • Lex Walker

      Well, Gravity is likely to surpass Man of Steel worldwide, especially when it gets a re-release in the run-up to the Academy Awards. Also, Man of Steel didn’t bomb, it just underperformed. Mostly due to a slate of popular films truncating it’s second-week (and onward) earnings which caused it to lose momentum quickly. That said, Superman vs. Batman seems like a lock for 1 billion+. How much more will depend on foreign audiences more than anything.

      • james

        Yeah I understand that, I just absolutely hate when people say that it bombed when in fact it really didn’t. Now I didn’t think it was a great movie but I thought it was a really good one with potential for a terrific sequel just like batman begins.

      • Lex Walker

        Yeah, not a bomb, just a really divisive underperforming blockbuster whose sequel now has vastly more potential than it ever did thanks to a change in the writers’ room. It’s gotta be at least 2.5 hours though considering the amount of people they’re piling in, but considering WB greenlights 3-hour Hobbit movies, that shouldn’t be a problem.

      • Alex Hajna

        Wonder Woman will be a small part, mark my words. She’ll probably be in one or two scenes, and MAYBE MAYBE one major scene towards the end. She won’t take away from Superman and Batman.

      • Liderc

        Yeah people are looking into these characters too much. I bet wonder woman isn’t even in the movie, just the woman herself acting as a normal person and we’ll “know” she’s wonder woman.

      • Sweet Pea

        Sorry but MoS Vs Batman Begins is a no contest. BB stands alone as a great Batman origin story, and is some people’s favourite in the trilogy. MoS was an overhyped, confused and average blockbuster that will hopefully lead to much better sequels (I’m not overly convinced with Snyder at the helm tho). Im a big fan of DC and Superman tho, so am genuinely hoping for the best. I also agree with your main point, MoS was definitely NOT a commercial flop, nowhere near.

      • eternalozzie

        I have the opposite point of view. Superman is quite possibly the stupidest hero ever penned because of his invulnerability but MOS actually made him a vulnerable likable character.

    • tracy

      Uhhh…the Man of Steel was itself a rebbot and sequal which was appropriately at the bottom or near the bottom of all the reboots and sequals…lol

      • eternalozzie

        spellcheck is Tracy’s kryptonite

      • http://www.collider.com/ DNAsplitter

        hahaha best burn I’ve seen in a long time.

    • http://www.collider.com/ DNAsplitter

      Man of Steel was a great start to introducing us to a new DC universe. I’m excited to see the pay off w the sequel. And the film definately did not bomb. I think it underperformed do to it being polarizing as many people wanted to see a re-hash for the Christopher Reeve films (Love those films but glad they went in a new direction).

      • james

        Couldn’t agree more DNA

      • enzofloc

        I don’t want a re-hash of the 70′s. But I don’t want a total train wreck either. If MOS, Iron Man 3 and TDKR are a sign of what’s to come, then the CGI-Comic Book genre has become a junkyard of mangled trash.

  • Alex Hajna

    I’m actually kind of surprised Iron Man 3 takes the cake this year. It didn’t get a whole lot of buzz, once people started seeing the movie. It really was mediocre amongst the masses. I thought it would’ve been Catching Fire or Gravity.

    • Lex Walker

      Can you imagine how much higher its grosses would have been if it had actually led up to a huge Iron Man and classic Mandarin showdown? Without that division over the twist, IM3 might have had another 200-300 million from the people who were too pissed off to see it again/give it good word of mouth.

      • Ridge

        totally agree with your point, I saw IM the opening night but with the “great” twist I totally hated the damn movie, I thought I was going to watch it at least 3 times and at least 1 on 3D but the movie was a complete joke, the mandarin was teased since IM1, but then they ruin it with the stupid actor thing, anyway, that little thing about the movie was enough for Disney to lose at least 50 or 60 dlls from my pocket and I think was the same situation for a lot of people, thank God was the last IM movie

      • Liderc

        Yeah, it’s a movie i’d normally see at least 2-3 times and I just saw it once because it was such crap.

      • Sten

        Get over it. A chinese bad guy in a big Marvel movie is a nogo. Actually any foreign bad guy seems to be a nogo. It’s the politics…
        Think about it. Makes totally sense.

      • Lex Walker

        I’m over it, and I’ve always understood why they didn’t do it, The post was merely a musing on what might have been from a box office perspective..I don’t disagree that it “makes totally sense”.

      • http://www.collider.com/ DNAsplitter

        I had this argument yesterday about the new Marvel One Shot that either may or may not feature Ben Kingsley in some sort of fashion. My point was that I hope it fixes the Mandarin twist and actually tease us by giving us the “real” Mandarin who is angry at this drunk actor for pretending to be him. But again, it is just wishful thinking. Oh well at least we have Thanos to look forward to in the Avengers 3.

    • milo

      Once these movies finish their run it won’t, at least not domestic. Catching Fire is at 398 million now (close to 8 million over the last three days) and should easily pass 409 million by the end of the run to pass both the original Hunger Games and Iron Man 3.

      And Gravity was a total shock how well it did, before it opened nobody expected it to make nearly that much.

  • The Flobbit

    Despicable Me 2 did SHOCKINGLY good. I mean, 800 million worldwide? That is meant for blockbusters and superhero films, not silly little cartoons.

    • Liderc

      Silly cartoons actually make some of the biggest box offices. Google it. We don’t watch them, but parents bring their 5 kids to see every one of those damn movies because it gives them an hour and half of quiet freedom.

      • The Flobbit

        My point is that 800 million is almost criminal. 400 million is more like it, for a good Pixar film. Despicable Me 2, I think, is just a fluke.

      • Sweet Pea

        We’ll see.. But I personally think you’ll see a similar performance when they release the Minions movie.

      • The Flobbit

        Oh, the first 7 bucks from the Minions movie will be from me. The Minions were the only good thing about the second film, and the prospect of getting an hour and a half of them is almost too good to be true.

      • Liderc

        Honestly, it’s mostly due to the fact that movies are getting larger releases now. Studios used to focus on the domestic market and now they focus on the international market, which is increasing profits dramatically.

        The sequel made $367mil domestic, while $552 million internationally.

        The first Despicable Me made $251 mil domestic and $291 mil international, look at the increase in the international market compared to the domestic market.

        Studios are also getting more films into China, which is boosting international markets like crazy. It’s why Iron Man 3 made so much money. If they hadn’t focused their efforts in China they wouldn’t have come close to crossing a billion.

      • The Flobbit

        AND Pacific Rim. Pacific Rim got 100 million from China alone.

      • Liderc

        Honestly, it’s mostly due to the fact that movies are getting larger releases now. Studios used to focus on the domestic market and now they focus on the international market, which is increasing profits dramatically.

        The sequel made $367mil domestic, while $552 million internationally.

        The first Despicable Me made $251 mil domestic and $291 mil international, look at the increase in the international market compared to the domestic market.

        Studios are also getting more films into China, which is boosting international markets like crazy. It’s why Iron Man 3 made so much money. If they hadn’t focused their efforts in China they wouldn’t have come close to crossing a billion.

  • milo

    Pretty funny seeing Catching Fire likely to end up number one domestic for the year considering how much of the opening weekend buzz was how disappointing the opening was.

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