Check out Two Clips from Yann Demange’s Exhilarating ’71 Starring Jack O’Connell

     September 19, 2014

71-jack-oconnell

Two ’71 clips have gone online, and they both do a great job at highlighting director Yann Demange‘s ability to build tension and create thrilling action.  The film is set in Belfast in 1971 and centers on a young British soldier (Jack O’Connell) that’s been abandoned by his unit following a riot.  Trapped behind enemy lines, he’s unable to tell friend from foe, and we follow as he tries to find his way home while the locals battle for supremacy.  These clips showcase the lead-up to the riot and O’Connell’s character, Private Gary Hook, on the run from Irish nationalists.  From these two brief clips, you can tell that Demange is a serious talent, and big things could be ahead for him if this movie is even a modest hit.

Hit the jump for the ’71 clips, click here for my review from TIFF, and click here for Steve’s interview with O’Connell from the Berlin Film Festival.  ’71 opens in the U.K. on October 10th; no U.S. release date has been announced.

Via The Playlist.

Here’s the official synopsis for ’71:

1971, and the conflict in Northern Ireland is escalating towards civil war. Young English recruit Gary is called into action in Belfast. The situation in the city is confusing and challenging – even for experienced military commanders. The town is divided into ‘loyal’ Protestant and ‘hostile’ Catholic areas. Both parties have paramilitary units; in addition, radical street gangs and undercover agents from all sides are trying to assert their interests on their own initiative. During a patrol, the soldiers become embroiled in a scuffle and one of them loses their weapon. Gary and a fellow soldier follow the thief who disappears into the crowd. Suddenly Gary is having to fend for himself alone in the midst of enemy territory. His journey back to his base that night is an odyssey filled with uncertainty, fear and desperation. Director Yann Demange exposes the futility of war in which every act of violence only breeds more violence. An existentialist nocturne about hidden identities, creeping paranoia and those forced to take a stand. As the film progresses, it gradually breaks free from specifics to become a more universal anti-war parable.

71-poster

’71 Clips

Tags

Latest News

Close