ALL IS LOST, the New Film from MARGIN CALL Director J.C. Chandor, Is Dialogue-Free

by     Posted 1 year, 223 days ago

all is lost robert redford

Writer-director J.C. Chandor landed a breakthrough flick with 2011′s Margin Call.  Chandor picked up an Oscar nomination for his screenplay, and his follow-up feature, All Is Lost, nabbed Robert Redford for the lead.  According to the press release from August, “Redford stars in a solo performance of one man lost at sea and his battle against the elements to stay alive.”  As we saw from Life of Pi, it’s not easy to make a movie where a single actor is stranded in the middle of the ocean.  But at least Pi Patel had a tiger for conversation.  Redford’s character will be silent.

Hit the jump for more.

At a press conference for the opening of the Sundance Film Festival, Redford said [via The Playlist] his character has no dialogue.  I’m curious to see if this includes voiceover, but even if it does, it will still be fascinating to see Redford in a movie unlike anything he’s done before, and hopefully trusting Chandor to deliver.  Redford has a history of forcing his will on the script and direction of his acting projects, but it looks like Chandor has been given the freedom to try something unique.  At the very least, it won’t have supposedly-intelligent characters asking their underlings to “explain it to me like I’m a child.”

Filming has wrapped on All Is Lost, so it will be interesting to see if it gets released this year, or if Chandor will choose to hold it for Sundance 2014.  Either way, I’m inclined to believe the flick will premiere at a Festival rather than launch directly into theaters.

robert redford all is lost




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  • scifilove

    This looks very interesting. There have been some films made with little to no dialogue for at least part of the movie, such as “Cast Away”, “Wall-E”, and “2001, a space odyssey”, and if it”s done well, can add a high level of drama to a scene without having to speak a word.

    The fact there is no dialogue could create an excellent sense of isolation and panic to a movie like this.

  • Alan B

    “At the very least, it won’t have supposedly-intelligent characters asking their underlings to “explain it to me like I’m a child.””

    Count on Matt Goldberg to not only misinterpret a key aspect of the film in his original review, but to repeat his own ignorance in this latest article. In his review of ‘Margin Call’, Goldberg complained that it was ludicrous that some of the higher ups of that company didn’t understand the details of their business. I can’t be bothered paraphrasing what I originally wrote on his review, so here was my response: “It seemed obvious – and a point of the film – that the higher ups don’t know the details because … they don’t need to know the details. Spacey is a manager, Bettany is a salesman: these guys don’t know those details because they are required to focus on other elements of the business. That’s not just true of the financial industry: that’s true of many industries. Does Goldberg think the head of the AMC cinema chain knows how to do what a box office staff member does? Does the head of Time Warner need to know how to set up a pay TV box? There is a chain of command, and – as you rise through a company – you need to apply different skills and possess other information in order to perform your job effectively.”

    As for his present criticism – that it is silly to feature “supposedly-intelligent characters asking their underlings to “explain it to me like I’m a child”” – err, I hope he actually realizes that just because a character says something, doesn’t mean it’s an honest reflection of the characters’ feelings. They could be lying, deliberately misinterpreting a situation, unconsciously misinterpreting something or refusing to display all their cards on the table. An intelligent character may not feel the need to show how brilliant he or she is: in fact, it may be in their interest to make the other characters feel intelligent, as the Jeremy Irons character John Tuld does in ‘Margin Call’. In the scene that Goldberg cites, Tuld is attempting to empower the Zachary Quinto to speak up, even i it means some of Quinto’s managers might get into trouble. Tuld understands that Quinto is in a shitty position, and deploys false modesty and charm to get what he needs from his employee. Are we REALLY meant to believe the line, “please speak as you might to a young child or a golden retriever, I didn’t get here on my brains I can assure you of
    that.” A billionaire tells a low-level employee that, hey, “I didn’t get here on my brains” and Goldberg takes this statement literally? Do you REALLY think that the character didn’t have some degree of intelligence to make his mark on the financial sector?

    Goldberg, just write up news in a NEWS piece. If you are so desperately insecure about your review that you need to repeat it in a NEWS piece around two years later, then maybe the review wasn’t that great to begin with …

    • Person

      I was just about to ask what the Philadelphia reference was about. Glad someone clarified it haha

    • Rui

      Yeah, I just saw the movie and the reviews comment on that line was just stupid.

      Probably one the most memorable quotes in the movie, its obvious the Jeremy Irons caracter says that with an intent, hoping to coax the employee to speak what he found without reservations. He also says whatever he wants because he is the boss.

  • anthro

    Like Jeremy Irons in the films said, “It wasn’t brains that got me here, i can assure you that”

    And it’s really well said and explain by Alan B. That’s why Intelligent characters are intelligent, they don’t go around showing how smart and intelligent they are, they operate on a secretive level, deceptive level, and quietly attack their underlings when they’re acquired all the info.

    I like Matt’s reviews and critique sometimes but other times he can be quite ignorant, and comes across as showing off to be much intelligent than the rest of us.

  • anthro

    Like Jeremy Irons in the films said, \"It wasn\’t brains that got me here, i can assure you that\"

    And it\’s really well said and explain by Alan B. That\’s why Intelligent characters are intelligent, they don\’t go around showing how smart and intelligent they are, they operate on a secretive level, deceptive level, and quietly attack their underlings when they\’re acquired all the info.

    I like Matt\’s reviews and critique sometimes but other times he can be quite ignorant, and comes across as showing off to be much intelligent than the rest of us.

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