Marvel’s Kevin Feige Talks Edgar Wright’s Departure From ANT-MAN; Teases the Tone of DOCTOR STRANGE

by     Posted 153 days ago

ant-man-kevin-feige-edgar-wright

It will probably be a long time before we get some truly candid quotes regarding director Edgar Wright’s departure from Ant-Man.  Maybe in 20 years when Peter Biskind gets around to whatever book of his that will cover Hollywood from 2000-2020.  Today’s comments from Marvel head Kevin Feige on the matter are probably about as frank as things are going to get in the near future.  The fact of the matter is that this kind of stuff happens all the time, but the exceptions here are that Wright was on the project for eight years and was only months out from shooting.  For whatever reason, Disney and Marvel (with an emphasis on the former most likely) became unhappy with the script fashioned by Wright and co-writer Joe Cornish and brought on studio writers to take a crack at a polish.  When that polish wasn’t to Wright and Cornish’s liking, they exited the project.

Enter new director Peyton Reed (in my opinion a very talented filmmaker in his own right) and a new revision by Adam McKay (followed up by a production polish).  While Feige doesn’t give exact details of what went wrong, he does successfully paint a portrait of a flawed dynamic where everyone is being “too nice.”  Which can always lead to problems.  Hit the jump for more on the departure of Ant-Man director Edgar Wright as well as a few tidbits about Doctor Strange.

kevin-feige-ant-man-director-edgar-wrightFeige told Empire Online:

“We’ve been with Edgar for eight years.  The disappointing thing for me is not being able to make a movie with him, right now; it’s just the personal relationship.  It was amicable and we sat in a room together and said this isn’t working.  I just wish I or he had figured that out somewhere in the eight years leading up to it.

Well, it’s not worth, right now, going into [what the disagreements were] in super-specifics.  I wish it wasn’t as late in the day as it was, but it just had become clear that there was an impasse that we had never reached before.  We’ve worked with lots of unbelievable talented filmmakers like Edgar before, and of course there are disagreements along the way.  We had always found a way around it, a way to battle through it and emerge on the other side with a better product.  It just became clear that both of us was just being too polite over the past eight years I guess!  Then it was clear that, ‘Oh you’re really not gonna stop talking about that note?’  ‘Oh, you’re really not gonna do that note?’  Alright this isn’t working.”

ant-man-director-edgar-wright-doctor-strange

Even if that’s a sanitized version of things, it totally makes sense to me.  I’ve witnessed that kind of dynamic play itself out before.  I’ll always be a fan of Wright’s, but now he’s free to get back in the business of making pure Edgar Wright movies, which is always my preference.

On the sunnier side of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Feige had nothing but love for the upcoming Dr. Strange and its director, horror vet Scott Derrickson:

“I would say you can certainly look at the past work of the filmmakers we hire as a bit of an indication for the tone of the movie, but not necessary everything.  The Russos, who are well known for their sitcoms, there is nothing sitcom about The Winter Soldier!  No, I wouldn’t say just because he has only done horror movies means that Doctor Strange is going to be a horror movie.  It means he is a talented filmmaker who we think could add something unique and very fresh to the particular franchise.  But there could be scary moments.  There are scary moments in all our movies! There are some scary people that Strange has to deal with, I will say.”

There you have it.  Are you going to give Peyton Reed a chance on Ant-Man?  I’m actually hopeful his version will be fine and I can double feature it with whatever wonderful feature Edgar Wright is probably currently developing.

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  • Person

    The fact is, as long as these studios decide to go ahead with universe-building, these superhero franchises are going to be more and more producer-driven. Directors with even an ounce of clout are going to be ignored for ones that can be controlled (not that it makes them any less talented, as the Russos have demonstrated). On top of that, Disney paid huge money for Marvel and wants to get as big a return on that as they can. So Joss Whedon is about as close as we’re gonna get to a director with his own vision and style, although I’m sure Peyton Reed will turn in at least a competent movie.

    • milo

      I don’t know that it’s really an issue of directors being allowed to have their own “vision and style”. I’m sure Marvel does want some variety of vision and style in their various films, and there’s room to do that. But the movies do need to fit the universe, and if there’s a disagreement about a significant point (particularly a plot point), Marvel is going to get their way, not the director or writer. Directing a movie for a studio is a job, particularly working with an existing property. And anyone taking that job needs to be aware that they can do their best to put their stamp on the movie but there will be decisions that aren’t theirs to make. Seems like Wright just wasn’t willing to work under the terms offered, in the past he has had close to complete freedom and in this case wasn’t willing to give that up.

      • Lovecraftlives

        Agreed! It takes the producers and the director/writer to work together to get the best film that they can get. You don’t want a George Lucas fucking things up like Phantom Menace, which really needed Fox to step in and say, “That Jar Jar shit has to go!”

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    • http://www.JustPressPlay.net Lex Walker

      Basically what Milo said, but with the added note that I think there are plenty of directors with definite visions and styles that happen to line up with what Marvel wants. 8 years ago that description fit Edgar Wright – but then with that time and all the other Marvel movies, what both parties wanted the movie to be no longer synced. Wright wanted the original vision but Marvel couldn’t do that since it might not have jived with where the universe had evolved to.

      • Grayden

        Except Wright’s vision for Ant-Man informed the overall tone for the MCU. Unless the tone has radically shifted from Iron Man to Guardians then I’m not seeing how Wright’s vision could be so far off from what Marvel wanted. Still think Feige doesn’t want to come clean and Wright has a gag order on the topic until after the film comes out.

      • Person

        You’re right. Like I’ve said before, Wright was hired back when Marvel was in its infancy and welcomed more director-driven fare because they had nothing to lose. Once they became an established brand, and Disney paid a bunch to acquire them, higher-ups took control to ensure that nothing messed with success. Wright’s version of Ant-Man likely would have been too different, which is a shame cuz it seems like the origin stories are the only Marvel movies that take stylistic/creative risks (minus Cap 2 and, to some extent, IM3).

      • El Maskador

        You’re right, everyone blames Feige. Why aren’t we pointing our fingers at Iger?

    • El Maskador

      Whedon and Gunn

  • Faptain America

    Having never seen any Edgar Wright movies, I am of the opinion that he’s overrated.
    Also, at Marvel, Kevin Feige is your boss. Bosses fire you if they don’t like you.

    • R0yBatty

      “Having no idea about anything, I’m going to go ahead and act like I’m not a total dumbshit dickhead and exclaim things that have no basis in reality or fact.” Tell ya what “Faptain(typical)America(n), I’M ur boss now, bitch! Oh, and UR FIRED!

      • eternalozzie

        cool name calling … are we like 7 ??? his movies are full of smug humor that is actually funny at times but if you have seen one of his movies you have seen them all.

      • Al

        I agree, he is no Peyton Reed.

        I’m finally convinced. Reed directed Ant-Man? BRING IT ON.

      • GrimReaper07

        Nope. Every single one of his movies is completely different. The only thing that binds them together are the cast and the style.

      • Norrtron

        Wow you’re so far off about everything. The humor in Edgar Wrights movies is about as far away from smug as you can get.

      • El Maskador

        His films are different, his Dialogue is up there with Tarentino and Far surpasses Kevin Smith. Check out Spaced. I am more excited what he will do next than Ant-Man.

    • Movie fan man

      I have seen some of his movies, and would say that he is indeed overrated. I don’t understand why the writers on this website can’t get over the fact that he’s not going to be directing Antman. This is probably going to be the least anticipated marvel movie ever. Big deal, he’s gone, get over it. They act like we are missing out on some great artistic work that could have been. It’s just a comic book movie. Who knows, it might actually be better WITHOUT Wright. If Marvel let him go, I would venture to say he probably had some crappy ideas. I’m annoyed that I actually commented here but I’m tired of this site whining about this movie.

      • Al

        Marvel didn’t let him go. He walked. After his Feige supervised final draft was given the greenlight (approval) and yet reworked by the bloke who writes some Marvel short films.

        I am sick of repeating this but people keep getting it wrong.

      • milo

        “After his Feige supervised final draft was given the greenlight
        (approval) and yet reworked…”

        According to what? From this it sounds like Marvel generally liked what he had but never got it to a point where they were completely happy. What’s your source for Marvel signing off on a draft and approving it as final?

      • Al

        When a project starts hiring actors, production heads, and the boss green lights it – that SHOULD be an indication that they are okay with things.

        Granted, yes, it’s very shady that it got to this point if parties really were unhappy. But thats my source for this. Either Feige was happy with it or pretending to be happy with it.

        Either way, I think that makes him the loser.

      • http://www.JustPressPlay.net Lex Walker

        Hiring actors and a script being done have nothing to do with one another. Especially if the role being hired for is for a potentially big franchise that’s had lots of success. You can get actors signed on the reputation and the promise of a cushy multi-film contract.

      • Al

        I’m sorry, hiring almost the entire cast. I should also stress we were a few weeks away from shooting when this thing unraveled. Sorry guys, this thing was in good shape.

      • milo

        So you’re saying they didn’t sign off on a final draft?

        If you think that movies don’t start hiring anyone until a script is completely finished and approved, you really don’t know much about the film industry.

        Scripts are a work in progress. Assuming what Feige says is true, it sounds like they were fairly close to a shooting script but in the end they asked for some specific changes to get it the rest of the way there and Wright refused to make them. It’s not a black and white situation of happy or not, they would have been happy had their requested changes been made – obviously they thought that Wright would make those changes but when they finally put their foot down he walked.

      • Al

        No, see, you’re getting what I said entirely wrong. I never said hiring someone means they were far along in the process. I said the amount of people they hired in numerous positions (cast/crew), how far each of those departments were and how close they were to shooting shows that either Marvel was happy with a finalized script, or Marvel was careless in letting it get how far it got without being comfortable.

      • http://www.collider.com/ DNAsplitter

        Once again you are incorrect. He was given his “greenlight” to the movie that was to be relased “before” The Avengers:AOU but he asked for extra time to make The Worlds’ End instead – hence delaying the film’s release date. In doing so the wheel kept turning and other films were released (GOTG & A2) so revisions were made to accomedate these changes. If Wright wasn’t willing to change his script for Marvel because they allowed him the extra time to film his other movie, then that’s not Marvel’s problem.

      • Al

        Ah, but after returning from The World’s End he still worked on a draft with Marvel, once again – which was approved, then the cast was hired, and then we had the CONFIRMED re-write behind his back in Spring! Right before production was to begin.

        Once again, the truth.

      • milo

        Again, what gave you the idea that some draft at some given time was “approved”? Hiring a cast doesn’t indicate a final script, it just means they felt like they were close enough that they’d be able to work out the remaining issues. And at this point they are working out those issues. Just without Wright.

      • Al

        Never, ever, said hiring a cast means a script was approved, I used that along with a whole lot of other activities to demonstrate that one of two things happened here.

        Marvel either approved it, or was acting very much like they approved it. This is not just hiring a lead or two years in advanced to beef up interest. This was a padded cast, a padded production team, lots of pre production supervised by the man himself, and very close to a start date

        To get this far and be so close to shooting without a finalized draft is incredibly reckless of a production company.

      • Kaye

        Hey, Al, just wanted to jump in here and say that while typically, your vision of the way things work would usually be spot on, it’s not true in this case. In this case, you’re working with a franchise based off of an already established body of work. What more than likely happened is that the producers talked it over and have an overarching view of how the entire series of movies will play out, which means they know which characters need to show up when.

        You have to remember, when Jeremy Renner was hired to play Hawkeye, the version of the script that he was told about NEVER had Hawkeye being mind controlled. This is because they simply knew that Hawkeye would be in the Avengers, not specifically what role he was going to play. So as they started to lead into this Antman movie, they probably had a cast of key characters that needed filling long before either party got to a happy place with the script.

        As said in this article, both parties were just being very polite with each other. For the last eight years, they seem to have constantly disagreed on some key point within the script, and every rewrite has tried to incorporate Wright’s vision that Marvel was just like, “No.” about. He wasn’t willing to budge, and neither were they. Eventually, weeks from shooting time, he finally realized he didn’t want to direct this movie without this key thing, so he walked.

        The script being “approved” never happened. That’s why they were hiring people to rewrite it; that’s why they were still in talks about that key thing that was causing such a disturbance. The only thing “approved” was probably a brief synopsis, and even then, they were probably like, “Great! Except for this one thing: Change it if you can, please.” And since it was too polite, Wright ignored the request.

      • Movie fan man

        Well, I think you are arguing a moot point. I never said he got fired as you imply. I simply said “let him go”. If Marvel truly thought he could put the best possible movie on the screen the wouldn’t let him walk. They also would do super secret squirrel rewrites behind his back. They obviously like his overall vision hence the green light, but there were apparently some issues with his final draft. Whether he quit or got fired doesn’t matter. He’s gone. Move on.

    • Drake

      For a comic book/graphic novel version of Edgar Wright, give Scott Pilgrim a look. Then imagine that filmmaker doing a Marvel movie…

      • Faptain America

        Since you said it so nicely, I will do that.

      • The Walking Cuban

        Do you mean Shaun of the Dead? Because…Other than the Zelda references, that sounds atrocious. A zombie with a shrinking/growing suit on the other hand…

    • GrimReaper07

      Lol, how can you think he’s overrated if you’ve never seen anything from him?

      • Faptain America

        Fair point, of course. I dunno, I just have a gut feeling that surely he must be good, but maybe not as great as fanboys make him out to be.

      • GrimReaper07

        He’s an auteur. Either you love his style or you’re indifferent/hate him. People who like him, love him. He’s definitively one of the best comedy directors out there.

    • blahblahblah

      You’re an idiot.

    • TigerFIST

      If you haven’t seen his films how can you comment. All stories have two sides and you only have one.

    • dude

      This must be the stupidest comment you’ve made on the internet. Seriously. And no I’m not an Edgar Wright fanboy. Just a fan of logic.

      • Faptain America

        I set out to hit a nerve, and boy did I. Having said that, I recall seeing Shaun of the Dead a long time ago and it was fun. At this point I guess I’m tired of hearing about this guy. I’ll wait to pass judgment again until i’ve seen Scott Pilgrim and/or whatever he makes next. Still, relax.

      • DavidisALLright

        I do think that your fault if you think he’s overrated. Everything’s overrated at this point. Meaningless word.

  • milo

    Well this certainly adds a new angle to things. People have been asking why Marvel “suddenly” didn’t like his script. Based on the end of his comments it sounds like they had been asking him for a specific change for a long time and he had been humoring them…then finally they insisted that he had to do it and he insisted that he just wouldn’t.

    Also people seem to think that working on a script for eight years is somehow a good thing. If the script reached a point where everyone involved (including Wright) thought it was amazing, they’d call it done and film it (or put that script on the back burner until schedules freed up if that was part of the delay). Taking *that* long makes it seem like it always showed some promise but it was a real struggle getting it finished off. Really seems like neither side ever totally loved the script, more like “hey this is great…if we just figure out how to fix…”

    • Al

      This is very disingenuous to facts. Both Feige and Wright acknowledge the unusual development time as occurring because at first Marvel wanted higher tiered superheros to have films, then had to make changes as Marvel universe progressed without them, then Wright asked to move as quickly as his producer pal was very ill and he wanted to finish Cornetoo trilogy asap.

      Feige’s latest excuse actually hurts him more. If we are to believe his excuse then he’s an incompetent producer to let it get this far and delve into crisis mode. In all fairness to him, however, every day must me a nightmare living in constant fear wondering if disney is going to can him.

      • milo

        He admits he shoudn’t have let it get this far. But based on his track record he’s probably one of the guys in hollywood least in fear of losing his job. No question the production of this film has been one of the more troubled ones for Marvel, and Feige certainly gets some of the blame. But even if the movie turns out awful and tanks, after the rest of Marvel’s output he has more than earned enough for Disney to survive one turkey. Don’t forget this is the next one released after Avengers 2, the performance of that is what keeps his job or not, Ant Man is just an afterthought regardless of how well or how poorly it does.

  • milo

    I don’t know that it will be that long before the details finally come out. At this point they don’t want to get too detailed and risk angering more fanboys, as well as avoiding spoilers if the dispute was over something like the inclusion of a plot point.

    But after the movie has come out (and probably home video etc) I don’t see why they couldn’t come out and say that “Wright wanted Pym to do XYZ and Marvel just couldn’t agree to it”. I really think that at some point we’re going to find out exactly what the impasse was over, and probably not that far off.

  • mighty mouse

    This just gives the fanboys something to bitch about after the movie comes out. “it wouldn’t have sucked if Sir Edgar would have made his movie”

  • http://www.collider.com/ DNAsplitter

    I enjoy Wright’s films but he just doesn’t operate well working for a studio run system. He does better when he’s given smaller budgets and more creative freedom (lets’ be honest none of his films are BO smashes as they do $25M in the states and $45M worldwide). This was a good thing to happen “before” filming started because it would have been disasterious had they been half way through production and had to part ways then – or lock him out of the editing process.

    I’m sure Peyton Reed will do fine under the Marvel banner as he has shown that he can handle visual films (Down w Love) and seems to have a passion for comic films as he wanted to do a FF4 film set in the 60′s (doesn’t sound like a bad idea compared to what Fox is trying to do now w Josh Trank).

    • appolox

      Really? Fantastic Four in the 60′s? That sounds fascinating, actually.

    • Person

      The Marvel brand almost guarantees that the box office numbers would be high no matter what. His style or work methodology should not have had too much of a bearing – keep in mind that they let Jon Favreau and the cast of the first Iron Man improvise a solid chunk of that movie without a firm script.

  • Guest

    I’m just here to preemtively tell DEADP00L to calm down.
    preemptively

    • Alex

      Deadpool sucks

    • Alex

      Deadpool sucks

  • TigerFIST

    This still sucks and I’m upset! I wonder why Directors keep dropping out from Marvel. hmmmmmmmmmm…………….

  • huey

    TLDR: not one fuck given

  • Manuel Orozco

    Ok if Edgar Wright can’t do Ant Man how about he does Star Trek 3 or the Power Ranger reboot

    • HORSEFLESH

      How about he do something better than either of those?

      • Manuel Orozco

        Let’s see what happens

  • Manchego Cheese

    “… ‘Oh, you’re really not gonna do that note?’ Alright this isn’t working.”

    People who’ve never made a film telling people who have how to make a film. Recipe for success right there.

    • celxx

      I’m pretty sure a head of a movie studio knows as much about the process of making as film as a director. He just doesn’t have the passion for the art side of things or the skills.

  • Scurvy

    Why did you guys leave out so much of the comments by Feige?

    I think this quote is MUCH more revealing.

    ‘The
    Marvel movies are very collaborative, and I think they are more
    collaborative than what he had been used to. And I totally respect that.
    “[But] the notion that Marvel was scared, the vision was too good, too
    far out for Marvel is not true. And I don’t want to talk too much about
    that because I think our movies speak to that. Go look at Iron Man 3; go look at The Winter Soldier; go see Guardians of the Galaxy later this month. It would have to be really out there to be too out there for us.” The Marvel honcho then boasted that Ant-Man is “in the best shape it’s ever been” with Yes Man director Peyton Reed. “Peyton is going to do a tremendous job and the cast is tremendously dedicated and the script is getting into amazing shape,” he said. “You
    wouldn’t expect a producer to say anything different, but when that
    movie comes out it will be the absolute best version of Ant-Man that could have existed.” He added, “The
    biggest disappointment for me is just the relationship, because I like
    Edgar very, very much and we were very close for many many years. But
    the perception that the big evil studio was too scared at the
    outside-the-box creative vision is just not the case.”‘

    • Jonboy

      Thank you for sharing this. I pointed out the Iron Man reference in my comment as well.

    • metril5

      LOL. “Collaborative” as in: “We really need you to take our advice on how your film will best conform to our low-grade assembly line specs. Can you do that for us?”

  • brNdon

    Everyone is still going to see Ant-Man. The sad fact is hat no one is going to see Edgar Wright’s Ant-Man…

  • brNdon

    Everyone is still going to see Ant-Man. The sad fact is hat no one is going to see Edgar Wright’s Ant-Man…

  • Jonboy

    I think the only thing that Feige did wrong was underestimate the clout he had over Wright. Other directors have changed their scripts for Marvel, and that may be something Feige got used to. So when Wright kept saying ‘No’ to things they thought he’d eventually give in. He didn’t for 8 years so they had to part ways. It’s sad but you have to look at Marvel’s success and understand that they have played a larger role in these movies than all the directors they’ve ever used.

    Anybody liked the Crank movies?…everybody thought they were cool? Tell us then why ‘Ghost rider 2′ was so bad?’ It’s cuz of the directors..Marvel gave Ghost rider another chance to hyped directors and failed. They don’t want to repeat that. Anybody here remember Ang Lee?…you know…the oscar winner? He made Hulk the way he wanted..he even played Hulk! that movie was terrible! Even Edward Norton couldn’t bring it back to life! Directors are good at making their own movies the way they want. Marvel as a fact is bigger than that. It’s their characters and directors need to work with Marvel to make good movies. You may like how Wright makes movies. But James Gunn, Shane Black …the game of Thrones director…they all accepted changes that Marvel may have made to their scripts.. They may look like they gave in.. but they made amazing, high grossing films anyway.

    People are probably gonna think Wright could’ve done it better every second they sit in the theatre watching Ant Man. (You know you want to). It’s a risk making a movie like this so I can’t anticipate it’s success no more than I could’ve anticipated that people called Winter Soldier (from the directors of You Me and Dupree!?) the greatest Marvel movie ever made. But the movie’s gonna happen. Marvel is gonna take credit. Edgar Wright is not. And he could’ve. He really could’ve. We may find out later why Wright left the project. Maybe it’s cuz Tony Stark is now responsible for Ultron and not Hank Pym. Maybe Wright didn’t like it. It’s clear that Marvel is open to ideas.. I mean Iron Man 3 basically laughed at the Mandarin, one of Marvel’s famous villains… so it had to be something really drastic.

    I prefer good stories more than fancy camera work and bold film making. I enjoyed Wrights films. I think the Cornetto series is a bit overrated though (Simon Pegg was most of it’s charm). Scott pilgrim was awesome but still none of these movies to me say that he’s a good story teller. Just a unique one.

    • HORSEFLESH

      I don’t believe Edgar Wright was saying ‘No’ to things for 8 years; both he and Cornish made changes to their script when they were requested to do so only a few months before filming which was when the breakdown began. When they refused to change it more than they wanted it was re-written for them.

      The project wouldn’t have lasted 8 years if they didn’t all originally agree on the direction of the film but in the meantime Marvel changed and Wright didn’t.

      • Jonboy

        I mean to say the idea of what Edgar wanted and what Marvel wanted were never the same in the 8 years it was put on hold. But when they made changes it must’ve been Edgar’s 8 years of wanting to make this movie that broke the whole thing down.

      • HORSEFLESH

        How do you know that? Anything published about it has Feige and Wright claiming the opposite. If there was that much disagreement it really wouldn’t have lasted 8 years. The reasons it was put on hold were more to do with scheduling than differing opinion.

        Marvel pre and post Avengers is a very different thing now. It’s not just a bunch of individual character films which had their own separate identities, it’s an Avengers universe, and this is more likely the reason why Marvel’s view of how and where their Ant-Man film fit into the bigger picture also changed.

      • Jonboy

        I don’t mean they were arguing for 8 years..just had different views that must’ve lasted 8 years. It’s just a thought..Either way I feel Wright missed out on something big.. He may make another movie.. but it’ll always be what if Wright made Ant Man and we’ll never know..

      • HORSEFLESH

        I believe both Wright and Marvel missed out and an Edgar Wright film properly promoted by Marvel’s geek machine -unlike Scott pilgrim- had a greater chance but Marvel don’t want that.

  • Steven

    The one universe thing is great in many respects but as we’ve seen with Thor 2 and the 2 Iron Man sequels it churns out a lot of filler.

    Down the line when cast members start leaving or certain films start to flop and need to be rebooted, things are gonna get real confusing and ugly.

  • Redjester

    This might be the one Marvel film I never watch. And I’m not even THAT big of an Edgar Wright fan, but I am a fan of studios allowing talented writer/director’s to put their vision on the screen.

    What this has turned into is the equivalent of a ‘musician’ who plays zero part in the writing and creation of the music they’re given credit for, and on top of that must use auto-tune while recording and lip-sync in concert. Of course, if they ever do demand that they write their own music, turn off auto-tune, and discontinue lip-synching, the studio simply replaces them with an ‘artist’ who is willing to go along with the cookie-cutter, paint-by-numbers, guaranteed-to-sell, and wholly unoriginal musical scam.

    This is what’s wrong with Art nowadays. Hopefully GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY is critically praised and performs well enough for Marvel to consider different a prized commodity rather than an infectious disease that needs to be treated.

    -end of rant.

  • Redjester

    This might be the one Marvel film I never watch. And I’m not even THAT big of an Edgar Wright fan, but I am a fan of studios allowing talented writer/director’s to put their vision on the screen.

    What this has turned into is the equivalent of a ‘musician’ who plays zero part in the writing and creation of the music they’re given credit for, and on top of that must use auto-tune while recording and lip-sync in concert. Of course, if they ever do demand that they write their own music, turn off auto-tune, and discontinue lip-synching, the studio simply replaces them with an ‘artist’ who is willing to go along with the cookie-cutter, paint-by-numbers, guaranteed-to-sell, and wholly unoriginal musical scam.

    This is what’s wrong with Art nowadays. Hopefully GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY is critically praised and performs well enough for Marvel to consider different a prized commodity rather than an infectious disease that needs to be treated.

    -end of rant.

  • Redjester

    This might be the one Marvel film I never watch. And I’m not even THAT big of an Edgar Wright fan, but I am a fan of studios allowing talented writer/director’s to put their vision on the screen.

    What this has turned into is the equivalent of a ‘musician’ who plays zero part in the writing and creation of the music they’re given credit for, and on top of that must use auto-tune while recording and lip-sync in concert. Of course, if they ever do demand that they write their own music, turn off auto-tune, and discontinue lip-synching, the studio simply replaces them with an ‘artist’ who is willing to go along with the cookie-cutter, paint-by-numbers, guaranteed-to-sell, and wholly unoriginal musical scam.

    This is what’s wrong with Art nowadays. Hopefully GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY is critically praised and performs well enough for Marvel to consider different a prized commodity rather than an infectious disease that needs to be treated.

    -end of rant.

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