‘Ash vs. Evil Dead’ Season 2: Bruce Campbell, Lucy Lawless on How Continuity Is for Wimps

     September 28, 2016

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The much-loved Starz horror-comedy series Ash vs. Evil Dead is back for Season 2, with Ash (Bruce Campbell) leaving Jacksonville and returning to his hometown of Elk Grove, Michigan. Although things with Ruby (Lucy Lawless) are shaky, at best, the former enemies, along with Pablo (Ray Santiago) and Kelly (Dana DeLorenzo) must form an uneasy alliance, if they’re going to survive the growing evil.

During a press conference, Bruce Campbell, Lucy Lawless and executive producer Rob Tapert talked about their fear of not living up to fan expectations, how much Sam Raimi is still able to be involved, the pressure to outdo the first season in the second season, why they think the show has gotten better in its storytelling, the incredible casting decision to bring on Lee Majors as Ash’s father, why Ash is not a good role model, how continuity is for wimps, and taking things to a whole new grotesque level.

Question: Were you ever worried that this show wouldn’t find an audience?

BRUCE CAMPBELL: I was worried, hell yeah! They could have easily gone, “Nice try!”

LUCY LAWLESS: It’s a big thing to live up to fan expectations. They’ve been demanding this for years.

CAMPBELL: It was like, “You’re bringing me back when I’m not really capable of doing it anymore?! Perfect let’s just see what happens!” Thank god, in the show, Ash wears a man girdle and has dentures, so we can get away with a lot. But, it’s been very gratifying. Fans are always very honest and very direct because they have no reason not to be, especially with social media where no one can find them. And they’ve been very accepting of the show, so we just don’t want to let them down. They were the ones who made enough noise, for so many decades. They would not shut up about these movies, God bless them. So, they put us in the position of being able to do it, and you never want to let them down. I’d rather let a studio executive down than the fans because they’re operating from a business point of view. I get where they’re coming from. But with fans, you’ve got to give little Billy what he wants. In this case, he wants carnage and mayhem, unbridled.

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