MPAA Grants BULLY Documentary PG-13 Rating After Profanity Cuts

by     Posted 2 years, 148 days ago

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After weeks of hemming and hawing over the R-rating stamped to the documentary, Bully has now been granted a PG-13 rating by the MPAA.  Though director Lee Hirsch wasn’t forced to cut a crucial scene in order to bring the rating down, he did remove three uses of the word “fuck” from the film in order to obtain the school-friendly PG-13.  The crucial scene in question involved a teen being bullied and harassed on a school bus and is said to be one of the major concerns the MPAA had with the film, but the new version of the doc will retain the entire scene uncut.  The MPAA is famously backwards when it comes to their ratings system, and many contend that Bully was in no way worthy of the R rating all along.

It’s more than a little messed up that movies like This Means War are given a PG-13, but an important documentary that could have a real impact on kids across the country is deemed “inappropriate” for those under the age of 17.  Nevertheless, with the new rating Bully should now be able to reach those that it was intended to help free of that filthy, harmful, terrible f-word.  Hit the jump to read the press release and to watch the powerful trailer.

bully-posterHere’s the press release (per Deadline):

April 5, 2012 – New York, NY – The Weinstein Company (TWC), aided by the guidance and consultation from attorneys David Boies and Ted Olson, announced today that the MPAA has lowered the R rating, given for some language, for BULLY to a PG-13 in time for the film’s April 13th expansion to 55 markets. The scene that has been at the forefront of the battle with the MPAA, the intense scene in the film that shows teen Alex Libby being bullied and harassed on a bus, has been left fully intact and unedited. BULLY director Lee Hirsch felt editing the scene was not an option, and subsequently refused to do so, since it is too important to the truth and integrity behind the film. Also a victory is the exception the MPAA made by allowing the film to be released with the new rating before 90 days, which is the length of time their policy states a film must wait to be in theaters after a rating change to avoid confusion or inconvenience for moviegoers.

This decision by the MPAA is a huge victory for the parents, educators, lawmakers, and most importantly, children, everywhere who have been fighting for months for the appropriate PG-13 rating without cutting some of the most sensitive moments. Three uses of the ‘F word’ were removed from other scenes, which ultimately persuaded the MPAA to lower the rating. Hirsch made the documentary with the intent to give an uncensored, real-life portrayal of what 13 million children suffer through every year.

The new rating, which came about with the great support from MPAA Chairman Chris Dodd, grants the schools, organizations and cities all around the country who are lined up and ready to screen BULLY, including the National Education Association and the Cincinnati School District, the opportunity to share this educational tool with their children.

“Senator Dodd is a hero for championing this cause, and the MPAA showed great courage by not cutting the scene everyone has been fighting to keep,” said TWC Co-Chairman Harvey Weinstein. “Senator Dodd’s support gives voice to the millions of children who suffer from
bullying, and on behalf of TWC, the filmmakers, the families in the film and the millions of children and parents who will now see this film, I thank him for recognizing that this very real issue cannot afford to go unnoticed.”

“I feel completely vindicated with this resolution,” said Hirsch. “While I retain my belief that PG-13 has always been the appropriate rating for this film, as reinforced by Canada’s rating of a PG, we have today scored a victory from the MPAA. The support and guidance we have received throughout this process has been incredible, from the more than half a million people who signed Katy Butler’s petition, to members of Congress, Governor Mike Huckabee and the many celebrities and others who raised their voices to express deeply felt support for a film that can inspire millions. The scene that mattered remains untouched and intact, which is a true sign that we have won this battle. With an array of great partners, a fabulous educator’s guide and extensive online tools, we can now bring this film unhindered, to youth and adults across our country.”

Building support for the Safe Schools Improvement Act is the next step in this movement for change. Already a meeting has been set with Senator Bob Casey to discuss how he can help. Lawmakers and politicians are being sought out to back the efforts of anti-bullying supporters everywhere in creating legislation that will comprehensively address the issues of bullying and harassment.

“If we can’t get the Safe Schools Improvement Act passed, we’ll be visiting the home states of each lawmaker until it does,” said Katy Butler, the 17 year old Michigan high school student who rallied petitioners on Change.org to urge the MPAA to lower BULLY’s rating. “On behalf of the more than half a million supporters who joined me on Change.org in petitioning the MPAA, I want to express how grateful I am not only to the MPAA for lowering the rating without cutting a vital scene, but to all of the people who used their voices to put a national spotlight on this movie and its mission.”

For the hundreds of organizations and individuals partnering with the film, the rating news means more screenings for more children.
Said National Education Association President Dennis Van Roekel, “The changing of the rating for BULLY from R to PG-13 will enable many more young people to see this film. NEA applauds the Motion Picture Association of America and the producers for the PG-13 rating. Every teenage student should have the opportunity to see this powerful documentary about a problem that still haunts our schools. NEA also salutes 17-year-old Katy Butler and the other young activists whose online petition drive led to having the rating for BULLY reconsidered.

After Weinstein’s and BULLY teen Alex Libby’s appeal in February to the MPAA for a PG-13 rating was denied by one vote, TWC and Hirsch chose to move forward with releasing the film unrated last weekend allowing theaters the chance to use their discretion when admitting children to the theater. BULLY leads all non-fiction films so far for 2012 with its strong opening weekend attendance.




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  • Travis

    One can only hope that Weinstein & Co. release the Blu-ray of this film uncut and unrated. The MPAA have perverted an entire art form due to their crass and corrupt nature. The day that they are cast out of society will be a great day for all lovers of cinema.

  • MisterED

    In my experience tweens drop F bombs all the time. That is not a rare thing, and looking back at my old school days, I did it too. The word compensated for many things. Including not being able to do what the word actually means.

    But then again, I live in the city and not in some gated community. So I guess some old farts would get the vapors when hearing Timmy and Emma dropping f-bombs like a sailor.

    But it happens. It really does. Especially in schools. Thus why so many people take the home school route. To shelter their lil’ angels from LIFE.

  • P

    newsflash, uptight parents of angelic children, your kids aren’t saint. i know, it hurts, but true. they use swearwords all the time, some far worse than the F-word. they’ve probably seen porno too, hey, they’ve probably already done the deeds. the bottom line, your beautiful sweet children can handle some profanity, hell, they are the pottymouths.

  • Justin

    I understand that the MPAA is absolutely terrible when it comes to use of profanity in movies, but this whole thing is just garbage publicity in general. If the movie’s so important for the nation’s young to see then just censor the fucking words like TWC was so eager to do with the King’s Speech instead of making such a big stink about it.

  • Deathdealer

    Is it just me, or is this the biggest case of irony I’ve seen yet. A movie about bullying is, effectively, bullied by the MPAA just to have a lower rating. They should have just released it as an unrated and be done with it.

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