CAPRICA Script Review

     July 8, 2008




Hello to all my fans in La La Land. It’s your neighborhood florist Fidel from Florida here to let you know I have gone to television’s future and visited Caprica. What did I see? First, smell my pretty flowers. Then read on.



My version of Caprica is dated September 2006 and was written by Remi Aubuchon (24, The Lyon’s Den) and Ronald D. Moore (Battlestar Gallactica, Star Trek: The Next Generation). Two notable cast members are Eric Stoltz (he’s been in everything but I’ll pick my two standouts — Some Kind of Wonderful, The Waterdance) as Daniel Graystone and Polly Walker (Cane, Rome) as Sister Clarice Willow.



THE STORY



Caprica follows two fathers and their desire to see their dead daughters again. Simple enough, right? But we’re in the Battlestar Gallactica universe, and rebirth has some definite dire overtones… *cough*Cylons*cough*



Zoe Graystone and her friends (Lacy and Ben) troll around in a holo-world, but they don’t seek the decadent hedonism of their teenage peers. They seek enlightenment and a higher calling. In this virtual reality, Zoe has created a double – Zoe-A – more a copy than a simple avatar. In their real lives, Sister Clarice heads the Athena Academy of their study with unclear motives. We don’t learn much about Tamara Adams except that it is her birthday. Zoe and Tamara’s paths cross on that fateful day as both of the girls shuffle off the mortal coil.



Daniel Graystone is at his wits end trying to pull a government military project together. It seems he can’t get his robot warrior (cue ominous music) to think, let alone shoot straight. Joseph Adams works as a lawyer but his Tauron past haunts him to this day, especially since his brother Sam doesn’t do his work for the side of the angels. The death of their two daughters unites their paths and the consequences of their decisions will be felt five decades later. Of course, the animosity comes a lot quicker. It usually does.



THE SKINNY


Did you know that Dr. Frankenstein lives on in the world of Battlestar Gallactica? That is the ultimate story being told here. Someone angry at the universe defies the gods in an attempt to bring the dead back to life. There are always consequences. In this case, roughly fifty years later humanity barely hangs onto existence after attempted genocide by robots called Cylons. Still, isn’t some good father-daughter time worth that?



No spoilers here, but this film won’t ONLY show the roots of the Cylons (and their theistic beliefs). A more alert reader (or viewer when the time comes), one who wasn’t so wrapped up in the evolving story, may catch certain other clues a little earlier. It ends with a multi-zing of “oh” realizations and definitely leaves room for story growth.



As a BSGeek (I watched the most recent season in one sitting), I was happily satisfied – this work stands on its own two cybernetic legs. At the beginning of the read, I was impatient for the ties to Battlestar proper. By the end, I was ready for the next chapter in the prequel. Unlike certain other prequels. (I’m looking at you, George)



THE FINAL WORD



In the nutshell – chills up and down my mostly human spine.




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