Christopher Nolan Talks about the Ending of THE DARK KNIGHT RISES and More

by     Posted 1 year, 305 days ago

Dark-Knight-Rises-image-Christopher-Nolan-IMAX-slice

Now that The Dark Knight Rises has made its way through its theatrical run, Christopher Nolan has eased up on being so vague about the film, and has done a fascinating interview with Film Comment where he looks back on his history with the Batman franchise.  Moving through Batman Begins, The Dark Knight, and The Dark Knight Rises, he talks about the influences of each film, his approach to the stories, how he envisioned Bruce Wayne’s behavior throughout the trilogy, and much more.  He also touches on the political elements of The Dark Knight Rises, its propulsive final hour, and the “open-ended” conclusion, which he doesn’t see as open-ended.

Hit the jump for more.  The Dark Knight Rises hits Blu-ray/DVD on December 4th.

christopher-nolan-the-dark-knight-rises[Spoilers ahead]

Speaking to Film Comment, Nolan says the ending of The Dark Knight Rises isn’t really meant to open the door for Joseph Gordon-Levitt to play the new Batman (although Warner Bros. may want Gordon-Levitt for the role).  The thinking wasn’t to create a cliffhanger, but to stress the thematic point of the film:

CHRISTOPHER NOLAN: For me, The Dark Knight Rises is specifically and definitely the end of the Batman story as I wanted to tell it, and the open-ended nature of the film is simply a very important thematic idea that we wanted to get into the movie, which is that Batman is a symbol. He can be anybody, and that was very important to us. Not every Batman fan will necessarily agree with that interpretation of the philosophy of the character, but for me it all comes back to the scene between Bruce Wayne and Alfred in the private jet in Batman Begins, where the only way that I could find to make a credible characterization of a guy transforming himself into Batman is if it was as a necessary symbol, and he saw himself as a catalyst for change and therefore it was a temporary process, maybe a five-year plan that would be enforced for symbolically encouraging the good of Gotham to take back their city. To me, for that mission to succeed, it has to end, so this is the ending for me, and as I say, the open-ended elements are all to do with the thematic idea that Batman was not important as a man, he’s more than that. He’s a symbol, and the symbol lives on.

This is a statement I strongly disagree with, and I think while the sentiment is nice, it ignores the plot that has come before.  Batman may be a symbol, but for a director who stresses the reality of the world he’s created, Bruce Wayne’s training is essential.  It’s the entire first act of Batman Begins.  It’s why Batman isn’t a guy wearing hockey pads.  Batman couldn’t be anyone.  He could only be someone who was physically fit and had access to serious resources.  That’s the reality.

dark-knight-rises-stock-exchange-baneNolan also spoke about the political aspects of the film, and how it has invited interpretations as advocacy from opposite sides of the political spectrum:

It was interesting to see the spectrum of reactions to The Dark Knight Rises, with some arguing that it was a sort of a neoconservative or very right-wing film and others seeing it as being a radical leftist film. And one of the things the film seems to be talking about is how easily the political rhetoric of one extreme can be co-opted by the complete opposite extreme.

NOLAN: Absolutely, and then you get into the philosophical question: if an energy or a movement can be co-opted for evil, then is that a critique of the movement itself? All of these different interpretations are possible. What was surprising to me is how many pundits would write about their political interpretation of the film and not understand that any one political interpretation necessarily involved ignoring huge chunks of the film. And it made me feel good about where we had positioned the film, because it’s not intended to be politically specific. It would be absurd to try to make a politically specific film about this subject matter, where you’re actually trying to pull the shackles off everyday life and go to a more frightening place where anything is possible. You’re off the conventional political spectrum, so it’s very subject to interpretation and misinterpretation.

the-dark-knight-rises-final-posterMy favorite aspect of The Dark Knight Rises is how it wraps you up in a non-stop energy to the point where you can forget about the narrative weaknesses.  Nolan says he feels he really was able to build to a satisfying action crescendo with the conclusion of the Batman trilogy:

NOLAN: We tried with all three films, but in the most extreme way with The Dark Knight Rises, what I call this sort of snowballing approach to action and events. We experimented with this in The Dark Knight, where the action is not based on clean and clear set pieces the way Batman Begins was, but we pushed it much further in this film. The scope and scale of the action is built from smaller pieces that snowball together so you’re cross-cutting, which I love doing, and trying to find a rhythm in conjunction with the music and the sound effects, so you’re building and building tension continuously over a long sustained part of the film, and not releasing that until the very last frame. It’s a risky strategy because you risk exhausting your audience, but to me it’s the most invigorating way of approaching the action film. It’s an approach I applied with Inception as well, to have parallel strands of tension rising and rising and then coming together. In The Dark Knight Rises, from the moment the music and sound drop and the little boy starts singing “The Star-Spangled Banner,” it’s kind of like the gloves are coming off. I’ve been amazed and delighted how people have accepted the extremity of where things go.




Like Us


Comments:

FB Comments

  • Lance

    Goldberg, you miss the forest for the trees. I knew what Nolan meant with his ending, and I understood it wasn’t meant to be a jumping off point for further sequels.

    When Nolan says “anyone” can be Batman, he doesn’t mean any fat guy who likes dressing up in a cape could be Batman. You’re taking it all too literally. He means that anyone who commits themselves to justice and a better world could make a difference like Batman, and anyone who dedicates themselves to the degree Bruce did could be the next Batman, even if they’re not wearing the Bat outfit — the legend, the inspiration of Batman will endure and help people rise up to be heroes whenever they’re needed in Gotham. And that concept is far bigger than Bruce Wayne, who ultimately is just a man with bad knees after years of leaping off rooftops.

    It’s a great, fitting ending that builds on everything in the first two movies.

    • Jenny

      Lance, I totally agree and feel that Goldberg just doesn’t get it. You hit the nail on the head with your statements! Sometimes I wonder if this Goldberg person likes anything. Perhaps he’s a robot? Or just bitter because he’s wanted to be in the film industry and he’s received nothing but rejection? Just guessing….

      • James

        I agree Lance, thats my thinking of it as well.

      • Jason Howler

        Leave it to Goldberg to not only miss the boat on what the director intended, but then be stupid enough to disagree with a misunderstanding. Here’s the reality, Goldberg: You shouldn’t be writing film reviews. You can’t even grasp the basic idea behind the motivations of a vigilante. Monumental fail.

    • Brett

      Exactly.

    • will

      Your comment was word-for-word what I planned mine to be. Goldberg, as per usual, absolutely and totally missed the point of the movie.

    • Todd

      Yup. I also totally disagree with Goldberg’s assessment.

    • Mr. Orange

      Like everyone else said, exactly. And about Matt’s comment about the hockey pads scene, Bruce comments later about the copy cats saying that’s not what he had in mind when he said he wanted to inspire people.

    • Luke

      The “anyone can be Batman” argument feels exactly like the “anyone can cook” idea from Ratatouille.

      Which makes Nolan the rat and Goldberg the critic who will one day understand what it all means and fall in love with Nolan’s work after being reminded of a touching childhood moment where everything was simpler.

    • Luke

      The \"anyone can be Batman\" argument feels exactly like the \"anyone can cook\" idea from Ratatouille.

      Which makes Nolan the rat and Goldberg the critic who will one day understand what it all means and fall in love with Nolan\’s work after being reminded of a touching childhood moment where everything was simpler.

      • ba ha

        I’m calling Nolan on his tomfoolery. His thematic point is that the WB executives wouldn’t let them kill off a cash cow character so he added a tacked on ending where someone was left to carry on the franchise.
        And even if the ending wasn’t predicated on mecenary considerations then it’s a thematically hollow intepretation of the Batman legend directly refuted by the films themselves. “What gives you the right? What makes you different from us? I’m not wearing hockeypads.” The vigilante scene in DK kind of directly contradicts Nolan’s message in DKR. So much for a grand design. Like lucas’ grand design (read making it up as he goes) vision of Star Wars

      • Andy

        No, you’re missing the point – the hockey-pad-wearing vigilantes of TDK were a world away from the trained and committed crime-fighter Levitt played in TDKR. Nolan wanted to show Batman would live on beyond Bruce Wayne. Like Bruce says in Batman Begins, he needs to be a symbol because it is “everlasting” – i.e. it lives beyond him. What WB forced Nolan to do was keep Bruce Wayne alive. The idea of Blake becoming Batman (and not Robin – betting that line was also thrown in on WB’s orders) was always going to be in there. Bruce Wayne is a mortal man, whereas Batman is immortal – that has been the point ever since Batman Begins.

      • Andy

        No, you’re missing the point – the hockey-pad-wearing vigilantes of TDK were a world away from the trained and committed crime-fighter Levitt played in TDKR. Nolan wanted to show Batman would live on beyond Bruce Wayne. Like Bruce says in Batman Begins, he needs to be a symbol because it is “everlasting” – i.e. it lives beyond him. What WB forced Nolan to do was keep Bruce Wayne alive. The idea of Blake becoming Batman (and not Robin – betting that line was also thrown in on WB’s orders) was always going to be in there. Bruce Wayne is a mortal man, whereas Batman is immortal – that has been the point ever since Batman Begins.

    • So let me get this straight

      So you guys are telling everyone what Nolan means when Nolan’s own words are “anyone can be batman”. His words. In the article we’re commenting on. He said that. He didn’t say “anyone who is fit, intelligent and has integrity can be batman.” If he wanted to say that he would have said it. “Anyone can be batman”. All you guys are doing is putting words in his mouth. You should let him speak for himself. Again, in the article directly above these comments. Go back up the page. Read it. Come back down. And now think.

      • Uh

        So by “back up” and “come down”, do you mean literally or in the analogous way that refers to manipulating the illusion on my 2d monitor? Context matters in even interpreting simple sentences. “Anyone can be Batman” can mean that being Batman requires having the skill and being in shape. Therefore any fat, weak, unskilled guy can train to become skilled and fit and be Batman. It’s not about probability or believability (since Batman is improbable in and of himself), it’s the ideological idea that Batman can be not Bruce Wayne and still stand for the same things.

        And yes, that is there in what he said. The “literal” interpretation you and Goldberg make is not there because the context contradicts it.

    • Jonathan

      This guy just keeps on ranting. Where has he lost his objectivity? And when will he stop acting as a retard and behaving like a professional reporter?

  • Vince

    While I think Christopher Nolan gave an uncharacteristically analysis of this film, it still holds ambiguity, politically and narratively. This is why I disagree with your sentiment that Batman can’t be anyone. While Nolan made clear that it wasn’t intended for another story to be made for another Batman he still allows for JGL to enter the bat cave which is in its essence symbolic not to literally allow a man to become a masked vigilante beating people to a pulp, which is why Nolan doesn’t show this action on screen and why the implications aren’t as far reaching in literal terms as symbolic. Nolan’s definition of the symbolism is pretty brilliant. Robin (JGL) and Bruce Wayne both were orphans with a dark past and people who learned how to fake a smile. While I think the symbolism can be misconstrued as literal, I think Nolan is conveying to his audience that each individual has the power to face fear by methods of empowerment and in some cases to embody it in order to defeat such a fear. That each individual has the power to conquer their fear and bring themselves peace by empowering others to do so, as Bruce does for Robin. This is just my take.

    • So let me get this straight

      So the batcave is symbolic and not literally meant to be a physical place where Robin can train? So what’s the symbolism of Batman leaving it to robin in his will? Did bruce symbolically draw the map that leads robin to the batcave? Is showing the reading of the will an opaque allegory about how batman has metaphorically written his will to robin through his good deeds and leadership? Or is it that the ending is so stupid people will fabric any justification at all to make it less dunderheaded? Also this line is in the movie: “there’s only one police in this town”. Police is plural.

    • So let me get this straight

      So the batcave is symbolic and not literally meant to be a physical place where Robin can train? So what’s the symbolism of Batman leaving it to robin in his will? Did bruce symbolically draw the map that leads robin to the batcave? Is showing the reading of the will an opaque allegory about how batman has metaphorically written his will to robin through his good deeds and leadership? Or is it that the ending is so stupid people will fabric any justification at all to make it less dunderheaded? Also this line is in the movie: “there’s only one police in this town”. Police is plural.

  • Robert

    I agree with Nolan and Lance. Batman has three things that make him unique: A sense of purpose that drives a phoemaninal physical stamina, resources to operate, and intelligence. At the end of the film, Bruce gives Blake the resources via the cave. Throughout the film he displays both the sense of purpose and intelligence that one needs to become Batman. Yes, he needs training, but the end of the film shows Gotham no longer needs Batman. However, if it does, Blake has the ability to take on the mantle.

    All things aside, I believe a vocal minority has been immensely foolish in their dismissal of this film, but time will be very good to it. Watch all three films when this is released next week and see if your opinion changes.

  • Melack

    I think some people take the word “anyone” a bit too literal when it comes to the thematic point of “Batman could be anyone”.

  • Someone

    I’m reading an interview and another opportunity arises(no pun intended) where Matt Goldberg can start criticizing. Fuck off.

  • Logan

    Why is this guy writing an article about a movie he clearly knows nothing about? You’re stupid to take what Nolan said literal. And It’s obvious he didn’t actually mean ‘anyone’, did you watch The Dark Knight?

  • Fox

    @Lance. Absolutely agree with what you said, and even though I had a couple of issues with Blake as a character, I completely understand what Nolan tried to achieve with the ending, I gotta say TDKR is my favorite film in the series and probably my favorite comic book movie to date, why? well that’s simple, beyond the way Batman Begins brilliantly introduces us to a more realistic approach to these kind of movies and heroes and the way The Dark Knight expands all these notions through memorable plot and characters I think “Rises” goes back to what’s all about, a journey of true heroism, and a very real, intimate one I gotta say, and I say true heroism because well, at the end the Batman isn’t a hero because he got powers from a lab accident or he wasn’t born a god or an alien, he’s a simple man who made a choice. Batman didn’t become a hero in the minds of all those people because he used super powers to show off, or saved them from an alien invasion, or because he’s better or more powerful than them, he’s a hero because he inspired people, he inspired them to change, to be good, or to stand as a force of good… In the last film you can literally see examples of how the hero achieves that: with Selina, with Foley, with Gordon and Blake, etc. Ultimately is a great conclusion to this idea.

  • Anonymous

    D.O.A. The story was boring, the villians were weak, the pace needed jolts from a pace-maker. Catwoman stole the film from everyone. Mr. Nolan couldn’t even come up with a good sequel title. I hope his Batman did die and any Nolan themes as well. He should have called it Batman Ends.

    • Pat

      Weak, lazy argument. The film took its time to tell its story. If you want a film that has set pieces every 15 minutes then this isn’t the film for you; however, not every film needs to be this way. I found it richly layered and wonderfully realized. As for Batman bearly being in it: The films were always about Bruce Wayne as much as they were about the alter ego.

      • Anonymous

        Not an argument, an opinion; of which we are all entitled. I stand by mine. By comparison, The Lord of the Rings films were also lengthy, but told great stories, in three cohesive parts. (p.s. The correct spelling is “barely”)

      • Hey, no.

        Not a weak or lazy argument. Just the argument you don’t like. The movie was bad, plain and simple.
        As far as “set pieces” goes, other than “Following” and “Memento” every Nolan movie is based around “set pieces”.

  • adi

    Who cares what was meant by this and that. What I saw was a good, decent enough movie which was finely crafted but which lacked the exciting moments that punctuated the last movie – sure Bane fighting Batman was epic stuff but those things were few and far between. The last movie was and still is the best Batman movie by far and from the outset of this one it could never be topped purely on the basis of just how finely (no disrespect to a great performance by Hardy) the Joker was portrayed by Ledger. At the end of the day, it is a good movie. Did I get a feeling after watching it, that I wanted to see again. Probably not. That’s saying something. It is what it is and it’s just that it’s a good movie but nothing special.

  • Matthias

    Agree with Nolan too, Goldberg should go back to that very important film called ‘Ratatouille’: “In the past, I have made no secret of my disdain for Chef Gusteau’s famous motto, “Anyone can cook.” But I realize, only now do I truly understand what he meant. Not everyone can become a great artist; but a great artist *can* come from *anywhere*. It is difficult to imagine more humble origins than those of the genius now cooking at Gusteau’s, who is, in this critic’s opinion, nothing less than the finest chef in France. I will be returning to Gusteau’s soon, hungry for more.” ( quote: Anton Ego)

    • Alan

      Goldberg does this all the time, though. It’s his only criticism of any film: that the filmmaker(s) in question do not understand their own material. That’s it, with the implication that he, on the other hand, “gets it”. I can understand someone asserting that a filmmaker doesn’t execute his conception or whatever, but the assertion that the filmmaker doesn’t understand their film/script/material is a criticism of astounding arrogance, and would require an in-depth understanding of the particular film’s production process.

      Tintin: “fall into the traps of using motion capture and 3D without understanding how to best utilize either technology”. Apparently, Goldberg understands more about motion capture technology than Spielberg.

      Premium Rush: “I’m not sure if it’s possible for a director to misunderstand his own script.” Note: Goldberg doesn’t suggest that Koepp directed it badly necessarily or executed it poorly on a writer’s level, he just didn’t understand it.

      The Bourne Legacy: “Director Paul Greengrass created what it meant to be a “Bourne” movie with The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum.” Apparently, Gilroy – who co-wrote the first three films – doesn’t understand a Bourne film. Or something.

      Now, apparently, Nolan can’t even articulate his own thoughts about the film without misunderstanding his own series. *Sigh* Nolan didn’t even mention Blake (which Goldberg seems to fixate upon), he just talked about Bruce and his own journey towards acceptance and freedom. He said that his interpretation of the ending of Bruce’s story is that he quits, and finds another life. I think that’s a valid interpretation of the Bruce arc. And even if Blake took up the mantle (which Goldberg seems to get pissy about), well then I would argue that possibly the events of TDKR were adequate training for the role of Batman: in TDKR, John Blake is shot at repeatedly, is thrown to the floor, becomes a detective, captures a supervillain (Selina/Catwoman), figures out who Batman is, throws away a weapon (like Bruce does in the first film), figures out a conspiracy, helps save the police force, learns to distrust authority (like Bruce does in the first film). You also assume he received some fight training before the events of the film, given his presence in the police force. On the other hand, in BB, Bruce gets hit with bamboo sticks and sniffs some drugs. Yeah, it is sooooooooooooooooooooooo implausible that a trained detective who experienced several life-changing events in TDKR would be Batman. Goldberg for the win.

  • Hey, no.

    Not a weak or lazy argument. Just the argument you don\’t like. The movie was bad, plain and simple.
    As far as \"set pieces\" goes, other than \"Following\" and \"Memento\" every Nolan movie is based around \"set pieces\".

    • Hey, no.

      Yo, Collider. Your comment section works as poorly as “The Dark Knight Rises”. — Oh, Snap.

      • Alan

        Err, only one person above you had a problem. Well done for falling into a trap that most of the others avoided, and for including that lame punchline, too. That was HILARIOUS.

      • Alan

        Oh, and I forgot: Oh Snappppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppp pppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppp pppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppp.

    • gravyboat

      Bad how? To say a movie is “bad, plain and simple” would indicate that the majority of people would agree with you, however, TDRK is pretty highly acclaimed and scored very well both with critics and the general population.

      Boondock Saints 2 is bad, plain and simple. Yogi Bear is bad, plain and simple. TDKR is definitely NOT bad, plain and simple.

  • Tony

    Cue that “Nolan is a hack blah blah blah” guy in 1, 2, 3….

    • Voice of the people

      I’m sorry that some of us were offended that a filmmaker who makes a pretense at being artistic turned in a transformers’ grade cacophany of empty spectacle, idiotic plot machination, poor characterization and plotting slouching across the screen at an unendurable length. But if you have no standards then wonderful! Buy the Dark Knight Rises and enjoy! I’ll be watching Tarkovsky instead.

      • Brett

        You were offended because you didn’t like a movie? Damn, get out more bro.

        Oh, and Tarkovsky blows.

      • Voice of the people

        “Tarkovsky blows”. Haha, you’re a Nolanite alright. The guy who did Solaris, Ivan’s Childhood, and Stalker blows. Because we all know Inception is waaaaay deeper than Solaris. HAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.
        Yes Nolan offended me by promising the biggest movie since the silent era and delivering a flaccid turd.

      • Brett

        “Nolanite?” HAHAHAHA

      • Voice of the people

        Webster’s defines Nolanite as follows : “A manchild with developmental issues and a sub-simian intellect who worships Christopher Nolan with blind idolatry because he wasted most of his life reading comics books and craves to have these wasted moments validated by a serious batman film”

      • Brett

        Never read a comic book in my life. And I didn’t bring up Nolan…you did. I was simply poking fun at your fanboy rage of “being offended” by a movie you didn’t like. Now please GTFO and take your fail with you.

      • Voice of the People

        You never read a comic book but you’re in the comment section of this article? okay then fella.
        You didn’t bring up Nolan but that’s clearly the subject everyone’s discussing as this is an article about a Nolan interview? I can tell my last comment stung you deep. You got to develop a thick skin if you want step to the big boys broseph.
        P.S. I’ll be offended at whatever I wanna be. It’s called freedom of speech fascist.

      • Logan

        Never heard of Stalker. Ever heard of Inception?

      • Flinderbahn

        Careful now, that’s a bit like saying “I’ve never heard of Citizen Kane but Dino Time is undoubtedly going to be the greatest movie of ALL TIME”.

      • lordjim

        what the hell are you comparing?!tarkovsky is my all time favourite director and i´m glad others apprecciate him but what are you comparing here?i didn´t like the heat for teenagers aproach of “the dark knight” but “the dark knigth rises” was actually my favourite batman movie next to burtons “batman returns” and i found it very enjoyable and i don´t look or care for plotholes in a genre movie, it´s about a phantasy and it´s music like atmosphere, i mean would you compare bach to chuck berry?nolan doesn´t pretend to make transcendental art it´s his fanboys that are probably still in puberty, i watched “the dark knight rises” two times in a row and i wasn´t bored for a single moment (with the dark knight for the last act i was just looking on my watch and giving it a second chance i couldn´t make it past the first hour) please don´t compare comic books to shakespeare they exist for completely different reasons, day dreams are not ment to make you think.

      • Voice of the people

        I’m comparing Stalker to Inception so the idiot who responded to me can realize there is actually a distinction between great art and insipid popcorn entertainment. Nolan is no artist. He is a glorified hack. Both Stalker and Inception are science fiction films that traffic in reality altering concepts. One, Stalker, uses its genre elements to create a thoughtful and profound examination of the human condition, the other is Inception where the best thing Nolan could come up with in the dream states is everyone wearing tailored suits and shooting pistols.
        I could take people liking DKR if they didn’t insist that it was some great masterpiece that had something profound to say about our society and the human condition. If people criticize DKR then Nolan fanboys are like “you didn’t understand”.No. We understand. Nolan makes sure you understand because he force feeds you lines of dialogue that explicitly tell you how you’re supposed to interpret the movie. That’ s why everyone is saying “anyone can be batman”. It’s because Nolan said so. It’s not like its shown in the film. It’s not like Nolan bothered to build this theme. It’s just tacked on at the end. Really profound. A great work of art would have a wide variety of interpretations not one tagline people parrot back to each other. The first ten comments on this section are derps going “ya bro exactly. It means anyone can be batman. Nolan said that’s what it means. You got to listen.” No. You got to think.

  • Todd

    Yup. I also totally disagree with Goldberg\’s assessment.

  • Sam

    The Dark Knight Rises was fun but full of holes. How does John Blake know on a hunch that Bruce Wayne is Batman? Oh yeah, cause he can relate to him as an angry orphan.

    • zzzzz

      What comes of the stabbing? He just plods along like no sharp thing stabbed him. Would have been better if he was poisoned and he had to contend with that at the end. Also, is he an escape artist? I know this director doesn’t want to hold our hands, but some insight into his escape would have been nice.

  • Fraud

    Chris Nolan is a hack fraud. He pretended to be an artist but proved with Rises he’s nothing but a lucas/spielberg-esque money whore who doesn’t care about the fans at all or artistic integrity or cinema as art. I HATE HIM!!! so very very much. He deserves to lose his fortune and become a chimney sweep. SELL OUT BASTARD!!!!!!

    • John

      Have fun at Transformers 4.

      • Kenneth

        Agreed. Nolan’s a total prostitute.

    • Ricky

      This guy nailed it. Nolan’s jumped the shark hard. Man of steel will suck!

  • Nina

    Thank You Christopher Nolan and all the cast and crew for making one of the greatest trilogy of all time

    • Voice of the people

      Thanking Nolan will only encourage Nolan’s wanton hackery. He should be pilloried instead.

      • Joshua W.

        Who would you like to direct a Batman movie? I’m curious.

      • Voice of the people

        I enjoyed Nolan’s Batman films until Rises. I was uber excited for it. I’d prefer any director who knew when to bow out and just leave things lie. He obviously didn’t care enough to do as many drafts of the screenplay that was needed for it to be solid or even give enough forethought to come up with a unique plot (Rises and Begins have the same major plot with a different maguffin even down to Batman and Gordon racing against the clock to stop a doomsday device from eradicating Gotham and Gordon being counted on to stop the denotation while Batman contends with the villain — yep same thing). Stylistically PTA or Aronofsky or Andrew Dominik would be my choice for a batman director but even then only if they had the nerve to put forward a truly dark vision of Batman and even then there would probably be too much money involved for the suits to not tamper with it. Essentially we should return to the fun, comic book sensibilities of the Burton batman as WB has shown they don’t have any interest in allowing an artist to execute a serious take on batman (Nolan lost the eye of the tiger).

      • zzzzz

        So basically he retells the same thing over and over – some do-hickey threatening the city putting it in chaos whilst he and gordon chase around to stop it with some villain to stop. I do hope that when reboot time comes they don’t go back to the campy shite of the last few Batmans. Nolan did show a new (and in my opinion most fitting way) of doing Batman.

  • Matt

    Matt Goldberg – the only thing Collider commentators hate more than The Dark Knight Rises…

  • Mr.Rich316

    I just wish it was out on DVD/Blu Ray now so Collider can review the disc and then we never have to hear about this movie again. That is until WB reboots Batman.Then people will start comparing the new one to this one. The only interesting thing will be to see if the re-boot gets compared to Batman Begins, The Dark Knight or The Dark Knight Rises.

  • junierizzle

    Plot holes be damned, I loved this movie. This is how I feel about it. Did I wonder how Bruce got back into Gotham, sure. Did I end up hating it because of that? No. How did Batman make a giant bat signal? I dont care, it got done and it was just meant to be cool, which it was. Matthew Modine sucked? Of course he did. Cant argue that. You can cut him out entirely and no one would notice. Did he ruin the movie for me? No. A movie doesn’t have to be a masterpiece to work for you.

    • AndrewRyan45

      FINALLY, A Collider commentator that I agree with! Thank you for expressing my exact opinion of the movie. No it wasn’t perfect and it had its fair share of issues, but I still loved the movie. The movie was an epic on every level, and even though it faltered along the way, this movie reached a scale that Batman Begins and The Dark Knight didn’t. This is actually my favorite of the series despite all the hate that the movie has been getting.

  • Mr. Orange

    I find it amazing how all the way up to the release of the movie everyone and their mom were saying “In Nolan We Trust” and praising everything he did and will ever do. Then one movie comes out and it’s a civil war of fanboys.

  • sense 11

    Amazing Trilogy, I do not care what the Haters say

  • Moe

    I have got to see this movie again so I can realize how terrible it is. I swear, when I left the theatre I was like, damn….that movie had amazing action, a great story and wrapped up the trilogy in excellent fashion.

    Little did I know that I had just watched a terrible POS with six hundred plot holes and a terrible director.

    Now that I think about it, Inception was absolutely amazing and i have watched that film like ten times and really enjoy it.

    DAMN YOU NOLAN. DAMN YOU TO HELL FOR MAKING ME LOVE YOUR TERRIBLE FILMS.

    I will now go watch a French film with subtitles and oodles of pretention so that I can tell myself that I alone understand what it is good and what is bad. Thank you.

  • Pingback: After The Cut | Christopher Nolan Talks About The Ending of The Dark Knight Rises

  • Strong Enough

    one of the greatest trilogies of all time

    • joey

      Better trilogies: godfather, back to the future, xmen, land before time, lotr, the hobbit (it’ll be better), police academy, veggie tales, scooby doo meets the 13 ghost, a nightmare on elm street, friday the 13th, well…basically any trilogy

      • junierizzle

        I know you are trying to be funny but this just makes you look like a troll. Yes, you are 100% right, Veggie Tales is a much better trilogy.

    • Snakebitey

      Its not in 3D so it can’t be when nolan learns how to do 3d he will be better.

  • Jake

    I have had a fun 7 years with this trilogy. Watching it, reading about it, and discussing it with my friends. To those who did not like it and came to this site to bash the ones who worked hard for it and the ones who actually loved it: Go fuck yourselves. Take your pretensions elsewhere.

    • rick

      Sorry brah but that’s not how the world works. People voice their opinions. Forcing people to think the same way as you is called groupthink at its what lead to the Third Reich. We’re taking a stand for freedom. If you can’t handle someone not liking a mediocre film stay the hell off the internet.

      • scottish_punk

        I agree with Jake, well said.

        No one is forcing anyone to think in any specific way, Rick. I think that he is making a point that, as sick as you probably are about people loving TDKR, we are as sick of people like you, who go on comment boards and mindlessly bash this movie.

        Third Reich my ass, you imbecile. You give the term fanboy a bad name.

      • Joseph

        Taking a stand for freedom? Seriously?

        Yes, thank you for that. Our freedoms were truly in jeaopardy because someone made a comment on this article. Without your reply we would certainly have moved into a fascist police state where we are all slaves to the “man.”

      • Joseph

        Taking a stand for freedom? Seriously?

        Yes, thank you for that. Our freedoms were truly in jeaopardy because someone made a comment on this article. Without your reply we would certainly have moved into a fascist police state where we are all slaves to the \"man.\"

    • duh

      uh, go fuck yourself sir and develop some taste…

      • skeet

        “I’m a butthole licking hipster and have REAL taste in movies. I’m so offended that you liked TDKR and I’m gonna make you feel like a tool for doing so.”

  • Mickey

    Rises was weak. I wish it would have been better.

  • duh

    stupid ending, pretty average film. sorry, and i’ve been reading batman since the 80s. this whole “anybody can be batman” shit just shows that the guy never really had a firm understanding of who the character is, how crazy he really is, and what drives him.

    • the next one

      You’re right. After three films at nearly three hours each, Nolan’s Batman is still undeveloped. At times Bale seemed lost trying to play him, probably due to a lack of direction and less-than grounded character profile. This is so ironic since Nolan’s trilogy attempted to anchor Batman in the real world and mount a psychological drama that begins with his childhood. While watching the movies I always got the feeling that the director didn’t even like Batman. As a huge fan of Batman I can’t say I was anything but disappointed with the trilogy, and can’t understand why so many fans have heaped so much praise on Nolan. I’m glad it’s over. While Heath Leger gave us the best Joker, the best Batman film still has yet to be made.

  • Shabidoo jr.

    Can’t wait for the bluray review. It’ll be passion of the christ 2: Nolan edition. I encourage everyone who disliked rises to voice their distaste in the comment section. Let’s get it over 1000 comments. Dec 4! Be there!

    Gordon: The haters have to come back
    Bruce: What if they don’t exist anymore?
    Gordon: They must….they must

    Bane: The hate rises garble…gurrrgh

    Catwoman: I’m not a character so much as a t&a bad quip delivery system

  • scottishpunk

    I’m curious if Collider gives Goldberg these assignments just to get a rise out of the comment board. Seriously, I could do without another article from this guy’; the grand majority of what he writes is wholly negative and smug, and a total lack of understanding of the base material. I come here to have a decent experience in reading articles about entertainment. The people who want to read about Nolan are obviously fans of the film and want to know more about Nolan’s process. Why give a story about something like TDKR to a person who not only disliked the film (along with almost everything else in filmdom) but doesn’t understand and will never get the source material, and if in fact he chooses his assignments, why doesn’t Collider stop him and give the assignment to someone else that either liked the film, understood the source material, or better yet, someone who writes without bias and just simply reports the story? Reading this, it feels as if Goldberg took upon this assignment with the intention of putting forward his own negative agenda toward a film he knew he hated, and that isn’t AT ALL what I come here for as a faithful reader of this site. Why won’t Collider simply listen to it’s faithful readers and take away his journalistic duties?

  • Henny

    It’s official. People treat Nolan as the New George Lucas.

    • Wait?

      Nolan is the new george lucas. Lucas gave his money to charity. Nolan’s just a sell-out

  • LUIS

    well in my opinion it’s really hard to follow up a masterpiece and the sense i get is that some people won’t accept anything a step below that standard, i think that TDKR is a great movie that had a very hard task and that task was to fill the void cause one thing is clear heath ledger’s dead fucked everything. the thing is that TDK was the movie that changed this from a succesful franchise into a phenomenon and to follow that is hard hard hard, based on that premise TDKR (in my opinion) “rises” to the ocasion,energized by a great cast a very good premise great action and a very ambitious plot. now don’t get me wrong this is not a perfect film but in my opinion is a great film that closed really well this “vision of batman”. so guys we all love cinema lets just talk cinema without hate FREE SPEECH, MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAVE FUN

  • Joe

    I should preface this by saying that I thoroughly enjoyed BB, TDK, and TDKR. I don’t find the “plotholes” argument to be compelling as a reason why this movie ranks below TDK. I think that people were so overawed by Heath Ledger’s performance they forgot about the numerous plotholes that existed in that movie (How did the Joker manage to coordinate his bus being pulled out of the Gotham Bank into a row of school buses, what happened at the Harvey Dent fundraiser after Batman jumped out of the window to save Rachel? Did the Joker just peace out?, how did Two-Face’s skin not rot?, how did Two-Face survive Maroni’s car being flipped on the goddamn highway?, etc., etc.). This doesn’t mean it was a bad movie, it was a great movie, but I feel that TDKR is rather unjustly criticized and over analyzed by internet folks (at least from those websites I tend to find myself reading).

    I also don’t understand where the vitriol towards this movie is coming from. Its difficult for me to believe that people actually think that this movie deserves scorn worthy of Transformers / John Carter / Star Wars Prequels / any other big money flop that has been made. An 87% (from 294 reviews) on Rotten Tomatoes, and a 78 on Metacritic kind of speak for themselves as objective criteria to this movies merits. I think that if it were a weaker year for movies TDKR would get serious Oscar-consideration, it just happened to come out in one of the strongest years for film in the last decade. Feel free to hate.. as Patton Oswalt once said, I don’t have to respect your opinion, I only have to acknowledge it, and I acknowledge that it is fucking stupid.

    • Wait?

      So you try to be even keeled then call anyone who dislikes the movie “fucking stupid”? Wow. Nerd rage is hilarious. Some peeps don’t need rotten tomatoes to tell them if a movie’s good or not. They can think for themselves.

    • Mr Kippling

      hmm yes DK has minor plot holes, DKR has shit loads, but those aside, DK is just a flat out better film than DKR for loads of reasons which is why the plot holes aren’t as obvious. The story is greater, the script is better, the writing of the characters and the choices they make have logic, the action is better…………………
      ill skip to the end and say its just all round a better Batman film as is Batman Begins, tonally and story wise…get over it!!!

  • Mavro

    Goldberg!!! You’re killing me, buddy. :)

  • Vince

    Or V For Vendetta, another huge similarity.

  • Mr Kippling

    yep, agree, the movie was a poor Nolan/Batman movie, not due to a lack of batman in costume or action but very poor character writing, some characters make awful choices and do things that are just plain dumb within the established Nolan universe.
    For example, Batman gets badly beaten taking on Bane head on in a fist fight, big fail, gets badly injured, eventually heals mentally and physically, time to take on bane again, but he doesn\’t think in true batman style \’i better have a different tactic and have a trick up my sleeve this time as last time he ruined me. But nope he just goes straight in for another pub brawl only this time he has the eye of the tiger, so doesn\’t win with mind over muscle just by hitting things again and again ;) DKR is pretty much Rocky 3 lets face it!
    Also the villains are a bit crap, bane was wasted, reduced to pretty much the same character in batman and robin, the evil heavy minion you get in bond films you just do what they are told. The nuke plot was pure lazy and the plot holes become bigger every time i see it. But there are moments that are still great, so i dont absolutely hate it, more very disappointed by it!
    One more thing, you say its a Bruce Wayne story, well its actually more of a story about JGL which is crap, the whole he knows wayne is batman stuff was such bad story telling.
    I thought the Dark Knight Returns animation was far better film than that!

    • Clay

      Some critiques on your critique: For his second brawl with Bane, Bruce had learned in the prison that Bane’s mask has a practical function, to deliver an anesthetic to his excruciating pain. Thus Bruce uses this knowledge to go directly for the tubes administering the anesthetic in Bane’s mask the second time around, effectively immobilizing him.

      To say Nolan’s Bane was reduced to Schumacher’s Bane is, like the Joker said, a ”bad joke.” Any unbiased examination of both films would show that Hardy’s Bane is exponentially more complex. He was operating under orders, but he was far from a minion. His relationship with Miranda alone negates this.

      The nuke plot was disappointing in concept, since it’s been overdone in recent years, but thematically it fits in the trilogy, and therefore justified. Bane was completing Ras’s work, which was decimating the city. A nuke is pretty good way to ensure that. Yes, the film had moments that test our suspension of disbelief, especially in the third act, but this where subjectivity comes into play. I clearly wasn’t as bothered as you and still think the movie works just fine as smart Hollywood filmmaking.

  • Mr Kippling

    hmm yes DK has minor plot holes, DKR has shit loads, but those aside, DK is just a flat out better film than DKR for loads of reasons which is why the plot holes aren\’t as obvious. The story is greater, the script is better, the writing of the characters and the choices they make have logic, the action is better…………………
    ill skip to the end and say its just all round a better Batman film as is Batman Begins, tonally and story wise…get over it!!!

  • lordjim

    what the hell are you comparing?!tarkovsky is my all time favourite director and i´m glad others apprecciate him but what are you comparing here?i didn´t like the heat for teenagers aproach of \"the dark knight\" but \"the dark knigth rises\" was actually my favourite batman movie next to burtons \"batman returns\" and i found it very enjoyable and i don´t look or care for plotholes in a genre movie, it´s about a phantasy and it´s music like atmosphere, i mean would you compare bach to chuck berry?nolan doesn´t pretend to make transcendental art it´s his fanboys that are probably still in puberty, i watched \"the dark knight rises\" two times in a row and i wasn´t bored for a single moment (with the dark knight for the last act i was just looking on my watch and giving it a second chance i couldn´t make it past the first hour) please don´t compare comic books to shakespeare they exist for completely different reasons, day dreams are not ment to make you think.

  • johnny white

    Anyone can be Batman. But not everyone wants to be Batman. Not everyone is qualified to be Batman. Is John Blake qualified to be Batman? No… but he will literally die trying.

  • johnny white

    Anyone can be Batman. But not everyone wants to be Batman. Not everyone is qualified to be Batman. Is John Blake qualified to be Batman? No… but he will literally die trying.

  • Every Commenter on This Thread

    Wah, wah, wah… Matt Goldberg didn’t do this right, Christopher Nolan didn’t do that right. I’m twelve and I do all my crying online.

    • Joseph

      Haha, awesome.

      Best comment yet.

  • Matt

    Rotten Tomato Scores:
    “Batman Begins”: 85% (Critics) 90% (Audience)
    “The Dark Knight”: 94% (Critics) 96% (Audience)
    “Dark Knight Rises”: 87% (Critics) 92% (Audience)

    IMDB Top 250
    “Batman Begins”: #103
    “The Dark Knight”: #7
    “Dark Knight Rises”: #32

    Box Office Results
    “Batman Begins”: $205.2M
    “The Dark Knight”: $533.3M
    “Dark Knight Rises”: $448.0M

    Haters Gonna Hate?

    • J.R.

      88.7% for a Trilogy, now that quality!
      I dint enjoy to much Rises as DK, but again I saw Rises two times in late screenings so ill wait for the Bluray to approve this movie.

      • scottishpunk

        Yes, it IS quality…and that’s even regardless of what Rotten Tomatoes reports.

        And let’s hit things home a little harder with WORLDWIDE TOTALS (combined with domestic BO):

        Batman Begins: $372,710,015
        The Dark Knight: $1,004,558,444
        The Dark Knight Rises: $1,080,944,546

        I say let the haters hate…they’re the unhappy ones.

  • AndrewRyan45

    FINALLY, A Collider commentator that I agree with! Thank you for expressing my exact opinion of the movie. No it wasn\’t perfect and it had its fair share of issues, but I still loved the movie. The movie was an epic on every level, and even though it faltered along the way, this movie reached a scale that Batman Begins and The Dark Knight didn\’t. This is actually my favorite of the series despite all the hate that the movie has been getting.

  • Pingback: Influence Film – movies news » Christopher Nolan Discusses the Open-Ended Nature of ‘The Dark Knight Rises’

  • Ben

    “Batman couldn’t be anyone.”

    See: “Anyone Can Cook” from Ratatouille.

  • Hhahahahahaha

    My favourite part about the blind DKR fanboy hysterical championing of a shite movie is that they lend it credibility by saying it’s the same message as a children’s movie. Yeah that’s about as deep as this treacle got.

  • marrowbonez

    I think the way they will (or should) go with it is having JGL searching for someone new to take up the mantle as the new batman. Someone who is already a badass. The new batman doesnt really need to be a billionaire anymore since much of the equipment already exists for him to use. No, it won’t be Bruce Wayne but it is the only way I can see them continuing without having to do another total reboot.

  • sHawty

    shoo i feels like i’m in the middle of noWhere

  • Pingback: Movie Monday – The Dark Knight Rises, Ted, Resident Evil: Retribution | The Journey of Two

  • http://imitationhermesbangle.blogspot.com/ imitation hermes bracelet

    greatest neutral that shows off all the details beautifully. At Barneys New York for $1350.It’s all about a man bag at Louis Vuitton for fall! Gentlemen, can you

Click Here