David Goyer Wants to Give THE INVISIBLE MAN the SHERLOCK HOLMES Treatment

     August 25, 2011

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David Goyer has been attached to remake The Invisible Man since 2007.  To give you an idea of how long that is in movie years, in 2008 Steve interviewed Goyer and got details on The Invisible Man and the Magneto prequel.  The Magneto prequel was eventually woven into this year’s X-Men: First Class.  But The Invisible Man is still alive and “working its way through the Universal development channels.”  Disconcertingly, Goyer tells Hero Complex that his take on H.G. Wells’ original 1897 story way (which was adapted by James Whale in 1933 and starred Claude Raines) would expand the mythology of the character (ugh).  Hit the jump for the full quote from Goyer and why I find it disappointing.

Goyer tells Hero Complex:

“It’s a period film but it’s period like Downey’s ’Sherlock Holmes,’” said Goyer, whose writing credits include “The Dark Knight” and the upcoming “Man of Steel” project that will put Superman back on the big screen. “It’s period but it’s a reinvention of the character in the sort of way that Stephen Sommers exploded ‘The Mummy’ into a much bigger kind of mythology. That’s kind of what we’ve done with ‘The Invisible Man.’”

This is what Goyer is citing as his inspirations: Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes and Stephen Sommers’ The Mummy.  And to an extent, I understand why he’s citing those movies.  If The Invisible Man is still churning through development hell, then maybe comparing it to those successful movies can get it into production.  But the trade off is that it does have to be modernized.  Additionally, Goyer doesn’t mention what this new version would do thematically or from a storytelling perspective.  Is it a comment on something? Is it trying to compare the ideas of Wells’ original novel to the present day?  Or is he simply on his way to rediscovering why Hollow Man flopped or repeating his own failed invisible protagonist flick, The Invisible?

One more question: how do you get a star on to what is ostensibly a big budget film and then make him invisible?  It may just have to be an actor who’s willing to convey the majority of their performance through body language instead of facial expressions.  Now that would be an interesting movie. [Awesome Invisible Man poster below by Kevin Tong]:

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