Elias Koteas, Cara Buono, and Sasha Barrese Join Remake LET ME IN; Principal Photography Begins

by     Posted 4 years, 303 days ago

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Principal Photography began today on Matt Reeves’ “Let Me In”, the remake of Tomas Alfredson’s acclaimed film, “Let the Right One In” which was an adaptation of the John Ajvide Lindqvist’s novel of the same name.  It’s difficult to find a fan of Alfredson’s film who is excited for this remake since the Swedish landscape is such an integral part of the film’s tone and overarching themes.  Couple that with the tendency of American films to avoid ambiguity and relationships which may make audiences uncomfortable and you can see why the reception of its production is (appropriately) chilly.

But actors Elias Koteas (“Zodiac”), Cara Buono (“The Sopranos”), and Sasha Barrese (“The Hangover”) are giving the film a chance and joining stars Kodi-Smit McPhee (“The Road”), Chloe Moretz (“Kick-Ass”) and Richard Jenkins (“The Visitor”).  Hit the jump for more details.

Here’s the logline of “Let Me In” from the press release:

In the haunting and provocative LET ME IN, an alienated 12-year-old boy (Smit-McPhee) befriends a mysterious young newcomer (Moretz) in his small New Mexico town and discovers an unconventional path to adulthood

Okay, that’s not what the original is about at all but that’s okay because I’m sure they have a reason for it.  The press release continues:

The filmmakers note that while the new film will pay respect to the original Swedish version, they intend to forge a unique identity for LET ME IN, placing it firmly in an American context.

Oh, sweet vampire Christ.  First off, Sweden is not a melting pot.  I’m not saying that there isn’t a diversity of culture, but Sweden is not even close to American in that level of diversity of culture let alone geography!  It’s very difficult to define an “American” context outside of large generalizations.  At best (and it wouldn’t be the worst idea ever), you can set in the context of the American southwest.  But no one would say that a small town in New Mexico is like a small town in Iowa or South Carolina or Montana.  America is too diverse.  Also, if this is just a coming-of-age tale, spare me.

The producers can say that they want to pay respect to the original but I have trouble believing that when I read “the story deserves to be seen by audiences on a wide scale,” which I take as “mainstream America hates reading subtitles and don’t want to see a film set in Sweden featuring a relationship that’s difficult to define.  Let’s dumb it down.”

What I want to hear from the filmmakers is that this is going to be a challenge.  This is a film that needs to justify its existence beyond the need for greater accessibility to American audiences.  And I say all of this as someone who respects the original but isn’t one of the hardcore faithful.

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  • Adrien

    I am totally against this until I see some trailer proving they can do anything with a perfect movie. I’m just looking forward to this at all.

  • Adrien

    I am totally against this until I see some trailer proving they can do anything with a perfect movie. I’m just looking forward to this at all.

  • InfiniteMonkey

    I totally agree. This is another dumbing down of the original classic Swedish version. Why can’t we let the original speak for itself? I love the Original!

    I guess what they say is true for Americans and I am American, when they say that they do all the remakes because they are so stupid and cannot stand reading translated text on the bottom of the screen. They just don’t want to hear other languages being spoken in their tubes, or cinemas.

    Pathetic.

  • InfiniteMonkey

    I totally agree. This is another dumbing down of the original classic Swedish version. Why can’t we let the original speak for itself? I love the Original!

    I guess what they say is true for Americans and I am American, when they say that they do all the remakes because they are so stupid and cannot stand reading translated text on the bottom of the screen. They just don’t want to hear other languages being spoken in their tubes, or cinemas.

    Pathetic.

  • Richard

    Don’t forget that some parents are so stupid. They see children in a film and think its a childrens movie. Anything less than a “R” rating will suck. No pun intended. I hate parents that disreguard the rating and bring their children to “R” movies.

    • InfiniteMonkey

      Do they really. Bloody hell are they smoking? LOL!

  • Richard

    Don’t forget that some parents are so stupid. They see children in a film and think its a childrens movie. Anything less than a “R” rating will suck. No pun intended. I hate parents that disreguard the rating and bring their children to “R” movies.

    • InfiniteMonkey

      Do they really. Bloody hell are they smoking? LOL!

  • Dave R.

    Wow, when I first read about the remake a couple months back I KNEW it was a horrible idea and now my belief is confirmed. American’s truly cannot handle foreign/subtitled films, plain and simple. When Pan’s Labyrinth came out, more than half the audiences left their theater once they realized it was subtitled (based on some reviews I’ve read). Let the Right One In is another example of American ignorance, and I am American, to deal with other cultures or even the idea of reading during a movie. They want to stay true to the original but they can’t even keep the same name, and I highly doubt they will reach for an “R” rating.

    I don’t mind the current fad with vampire films/novels as long as they are original or are not simply trying to mooch off of another individual’s success. Hollywood has definitively Let the Wrong One In with the remake/reboot, enough said.

  • Dave R.

    Wow, when I first read about the remake a couple months back I KNEW it was a horrible idea and now my belief is confirmed. American’s truly cannot handle foreign/subtitled films, plain and simple. When Pan’s Labyrinth came out, more than half the audiences left their theater once they realized it was subtitled (based on some reviews I’ve read). Let the Right One In is another example of American ignorance, and I am American, to deal with other cultures or even the idea of reading during a movie. They want to stay true to the original but they can’t even keep the same name, and I highly doubt they will reach for an “R” rating.

    I don’t mind the current fad with vampire films/novels as long as they are original or are not simply trying to mooch off of another individual’s success. Hollywood has definitively Let the Wrong One In with the remake/reboot, enough said.

  • dj.cyrille

    I agree with our American don’t like subtitles film, but for me i ready saw the film it was so great that i will love it and the remake wil be very bad like always.

  • dj.cyrille

    I agree with our American don’t like subtitles film, but for me i ready saw the film it was so great that i will love it and the remake wil be very bad like always.

  • Ashley

    Good god, America turns everything it touches to shit.

    The original was ridiculously great. They need to scrap the remake and just show the original. It might actually make a few American’s think a little bit.

  • Ashley

    Good god, America turns everything it touches to shit.

    The original was ridiculously great. They need to scrap the remake and just show the original. It might actually make a few American’s think a little bit.

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