David S. Goyer Boards James Cameron’s FANTASTIC VOYAGE Remake

by     Posted 174 days ago

fantastic-voyage-remake-david-goyer

20th Century Fox is breathing new life into its long-developing remake of Fantastic Voyage.  An update of the 1966 sci-fi film of the same name has been in the works for years with producer James Cameron, and most recently Shawn Levy was onboard as director and moving towards production.  That iteration of the project never came to fruition, and though various drafts of the screenplay have been written, Fantastic Voyage has been dormant for the last couple of years.  But all of that is now changing, as Fox is intent on fast-tracking the project by enlisting Man of Steel architect David S. Goyer to pen a new treatment.  Read on after the jump.

fantastic-voyage-posterPer Heat Vision, Goyer has been enlisted to executive produce and write a new treatment for Fantastic Voyage for producer James Cameron and Fox.  It doesn’t appear as though Goyer will be writing the full screenplay—he’s juggling a number of different projects at the moment—but instead it looks like Fox and Cameron have tapped him to shape the new take on the sci-fi classic, which they will likely hand off to another screenwriter.  For those unfamiliar with the property, the story involves a group of scientists who shrink themselves in order to enter a colleague’s body and save him from a blood clot.

Cameron has been high on Fantastic Voyage for years, and when Levy was attached to direct, the pic was envisioned as an adventurous 3D tentpole.  Fox is hoping that Goyer’s re-engineering of the property will kickstart the event-sized film, as Fantastic Voyage is now on the fast track for the studio.

In addition to Man of Steel, Goyer penned the initial draft of Warner Bros.’ upcoming Man of Steel follow-up and also wrote the treatment for an adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Sandman, which is being developed as a directorial vehicle for Joseph Gordon-Levitt.  In addition to all of this, Goyer also acts as showrunner on the Starz series Da Vinci’s Demons and co-wrote the pilot for NBC’s Constantine.




Like Us


Comments:

FB Comments

  • http://www.JustPressPlay.net Lex Walker

    Which makes Warner Brothers and James Cameron the only two entities on Earth that haven’t noticed what a shitty writer David Goyer is.

    • T

      Couldn’t AGREE with you more!
      What a shit-fest he will come up with…. Seems likes all hot properties in Hollywood keep being cycled around Orci, Kurtzman, Lindelof and this guy. Enter them 4, excretes Poop Bonanza…

      Where are the good writers?

    • Drake

      The thing with Goyer is that he has good ideas, but he just isn’t a good screenwriter. For instance, some of the concepts in Man of Steel were intriguing, but the script itself (and mostly, the way the characters were written) really fell flat.

      • http://www.JustPressPlay.net Lex Walker

        Yeah, he does have good ideas, if only he’d stop trying to get ‘screenplay by’ credits and settle for ‘story by’ credits.

      • http://www.collider.com/ DNAsplitter

        It’s why I hope he get “story by” for BVS and not screenplay. Hopefully that’ll go to Chris Terrio and we’ll actually have something that will be much richer than what MOS offered.

      • http://www.collider.com/ DNAsplitter

        It’s why I hope he get “story by” for BVS and not screenplay. Hopefully that’ll go to Chris Terrio and we’ll actually have something that will be much richer than what MOS offered.

      • http://www.collider.com/ DNAsplitter

        It’s why I hope he get “story by” for BVS and not screenplay. Hopefully that’ll go to Chris Terrio and we’ll actually have something that will be much richer than what MOS offered.

      • Fahad Ali

        Good ideas that he mostly borrows from comics. Man of Steel borrowed a fair bit from the books, even the “… and they’ll join you in the sun” line.

        Goyer is proof that you can shticky but lucky at the same time.

      • Fahad Ali

        Good ideas that he mostly borrows from comics. Man of Steel borrowed a fair bit from the books, even the “… and they’ll join you in the sun” line.

        Goyer is proof that you can shticky but lucky at the same time.

      • Fahad Ali

        Good ideas that he mostly borrows from comics. Man of Steel borrowed a fair bit from the books, even the “… and they’ll join you in the sun” line.

        Goyer is proof that you can shticky but lucky at the same time.

    • Drake

      The thing with Goyer is that he has good ideas, but he just isn’t a good screenwriter. For instance, some of the concepts in Man of Steel were intriguing, but the script itself (and mostly, the way the characters were written) really fell flat.

    • The Flobbit

      And not Guillermo Del Toro and Christopher Nolan, both of whom have used Goyer’s writing skills for some of the best superhero films ever made?

      • http://www.JustPressPlay.net Lex Walker

        Two things wrong with your question… Even if David Goyer had singlehandedly written Batman Begins (which I’m assuming is the Nolan film you’re talking about and which he didn’t write by himself), neither it nor the Blade movies come close to “best superhero films ever made” which is a ridiculous argument to try to create anyways considering its subjective nature. The Blade movies aren’t the perfect CBM craze-creating moments people like to credit them as. They’re good, but my god they’re nowhere close to “some of the best” ever. Blade and Blade II are, however, probably the best solo works we’ve ever gotten from Goyer. Also, considering Guillermo gave us a pretty damn good script for Hellboy 2 (and other films), part of me suspects some of the worst elements of Goyer’s dialogue from Blade II got left on the cutting room floor – which could be why it’s miles better than Blade.

      • http://www.JustPressPlay.net Lex Walker

        Two things wrong with your question… Even if David Goyer had singlehandedly written Batman Begins (which I’m assuming is the Nolan film you’re talking about and which he didn’t write by himself), neither it nor the Blade movies come close to “best superhero films ever made” which is a ridiculous argument to try to create anyways considering its subjective nature. The Blade movies aren’t the perfect CBM craze-creating moments people like to credit them as. They’re good, but my god they’re nowhere close to “some of the best” ever. Blade and Blade II are, however, probably the best solo works we’ve ever gotten from Goyer. Also, considering Guillermo gave us a pretty damn good script for Hellboy 2 (and other films), part of me suspects some of the worst elements of Goyer’s dialogue from Blade II got left on the cutting room floor – which could be why it’s miles better than Blade.

    • The Flobbit

      And not Guillermo Del Toro and Christopher Nolan, both of whom have used Goyer’s writing skills for some of the best superhero films ever made?

  • YodaRocks

    And the travesty continues…

  • YodaRocks

    And the travesty continues…

  • Dan Robert Head

    This perfect for modern version but why goyer

  • Dan Robert Head

    This perfect for modern version but why goyer

  • Pingback: James Cameron plant Remake von "Die phantastische Reise"

  • DEADP00L

    James Cameron has official lost the plot.

  • Pingback: David S. Goyer Boards James Cameron’s FANTASTIC VOYAGE Remake | Sci-Fi Talk

Click Here