New GONE GIRL Clip: Ben Affleck is Brought in for Questioning

by     Posted 83 days ago

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I should know my own blood type, right?  Thanks to this new Gone Girl clip, I might actually look into that.  David Fincher’s latest is just days away from its October 3rd wide release, so we’ve got promotional material pouring in.  In this latest clip from the film, Ben Affleck’s Nick Dunne doesn’t know if his wife’s got friends, he doesn’t know what she does during the day and he doesn’t know her blood type either, and the cops (Patrick Fugit and Kim Dickens) interrogating him aren’t happy about it.

Gone Girl just had its world premiere at the New York Film Festival Friday night and soon thereafter, the web was flooded with high praise so this one really might live up to all the hype.  Hit the jump to check out that new Gone Girl clip.  The film also stars Rosamund PikeTyler PerryCarrie CoonScoot McNairyMissi PyleCasey WilsonEmily Ratajkowski and Neil Patrick Harris.

David Fincher Met for STAR WARS: EPISODE VII; Explains Why He Turned It Down

by     Posted 83 days ago

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With the upcoming release of David Fincher‘s Gone Girl this Friday, the director has been making the press rounds.  Naturally, he was asked about Star Wars because you can ask any director about it, and he said he did have a meeting with producer Kathleen Kennedy about helming Star Wars: Episode VII.  Before you get too excited, keep in mind that the producers likely cast a very wide net, and just because Fincher had a conversation about the movie, that doesn’t mean he got anywhere close to doing it.

In fact, he explained why he turned it down as well as his interesting take on A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back.  Hit the jump for what he had to say.

The Films of David Fincher: THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON

by     Posted 84 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

Across his filmography, David Fincher’s work has been noted as dark, foreboding, chilly, cynical, cutting, and irreverent.  The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is a striking anomaly in his filmography as the allure of the project makes some sense, but the execution is a lush, unabashed romance bubbling with mawkish sentiment.  The movie is graceful, beautiful, poetic, and yet oddly distant.  The whole production feels gilded as Fincher made a deeply moving film out of a fairly terrible script.  The most curious thing about The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is how it manages to be a tearjerker despite its craven desire to elicit emotion from a director who rejects sentimentality.

The Films of David Fincher: ZODIAC

by     Posted 85 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

Listening to the commentary tracks for Se7en, The Game, Fight Club, and Panic Room, you can hear in Fincher’s voice a slight bit of annoyance and frustration.  It’s not quite bitterness, but there’s an acerbic quality from a man who’s exhausted and can’t help but lay out wry observations.  The Panic Room track in particular conveys the sense that no one should ever make a movie because it’s a hellish experience meant only for masochists.  But his commentaries pick up afterwards, and I believe that’s partly because Fincher found his true love: digital.

Digital completely changed the way Fincher made movies, and it allowed him to provide the precision to performances that he’d applied to all other aspects of his pictures.  From here on, he sounds much happier, and when talking about Zodiac, it’s like a trip down memory lane as he recalls childhood memories of a serial killer who terrorized and tormented a city, and would never be caught.  Zodiac is by no means a happy movie, but it’s one that feels like part of a revitalized director who found a picture that fits perfectly with his admiration for process, attention to detail, and the cynicism of how a search for “truth” can rip lives apart.

TOP 5: THE EQUALIZER, David Fincher Retrospective, First BLACKHAT Trailer, THE BOXTROLLS, New Trailer for THE BABADOOK

by     Posted 85 days ago

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Two weeks ago I promised a recap of my time at MondoCon for today’s opening paragraph. As it turns out, I ended up doing a standalone recap of the event earlier in the week which frees up space for a recommendation today. In spite of its lukewarm reception thus far, director Shawn Levy‘s family dramedy This Is Where I Leave You is absolutely worth checking out. Sure, it can be formulaic at times. Yeah, some of the characters’ trials are a touch melodramatic. Still yet, Leave You is an enjoyable pic with great performances across its ensemble cast (especially from Adam Driver and Rose Byrne). It’s the type of mildly grown-up fare that I’d love to see Levy revisit sooner rather than later. If you haven’t already, skip the reviews and check it out for yourself. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

Moving on to the reason we’re all here, this week’s Top 5 features interviews for and our review of Denzel Washington‘s The Equalizer, Matt’s retrospective look at the work of David Fincher, the first trailer for Michael Mann‘s crime drama Blackhat, our review and interviews for Laika’s The Boxtrolls, and a new trailer for writer/director Jennifer Kent‘s The Babadook because I haven’t yet hyped that film enough. Keep reading for a brief recap and link to each of the above.

The Films of David Fincher: PANIC ROOM

by     Posted 86 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

Although my evidence is purely anecdotal, I’ve found Panic Room to be the red-headed stepchild of Fincher’s filmography.  Its biggest sin seems to be its lack of thematic or narrative ambition, which is unfair because A) it’s a faulty appraisal of what the film is trying to achieve; and B) it dismisses the film’s technical mastery, and how the picture overcame a slew of unexpected problems.  If Alien 3 was an onslaught of insurmountable odds caused by studio meddling, Panic Room met unforeseen challenges and rose to the occasion every time to create what was, as intended, “a Friday night date movie.”

The Films of David Fincher: FIGHT CLUB

by     Posted 87 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

The first rule of Fight Club is to talk about Fight Club.  The movie underperformed at the box office, and found life on DVD where it became a cult classic.  Within the context of the film, Tyler Durden’s famous rule is a brilliant and ironic bit of marketing for a group of men trying to reject advertising and find human connection.  “Jack” (for clarity purposes, I’ll use this name to refer to the Narrator) may be our storyteller, but Tyler is our lens, and through that lens, the story of Fight Club has been greatly misinterpreted by any audience member who saw the movie and thought, “I should start a fight club!”  The movie isn’t preaching.  It isn’t an angry screed by David Fincher or worshiping at the Church of Tyler Durden.  It’s not even wholly about male bonding.  Fight Club is a romantic comedy as only David Fincher could tell it.

The Films of David Fincher: THE GAME

by     Posted 88 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

Se7en is a dark, brooding film focusing on the nature of sin.  It’s atmospheric, beautifully shot, and thoughtfully constructed.  Unfortunately, The Game was a painfully disappointing follow-up where Fincher’s cynicism provided too much of a gap.  The movie has the veneer of something cathartic and exciting, but whereas the darkness of Se7en had an nasty, beating pulse, The Game was a limp mish-mash of ideas that still managed to culminate into something thoughtful, but the thought was unrewarding when compared to the other movies Fincher would make in most of his other movies.  Se7en was a huge step forward, but The Game was an awkward retreat into the basics of filmmaking rather than a glimpse into the soul of its shallow protagonist.

The Films of David Fincher: SE7EN

by     Posted 89 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

Where as Alien3 has been forgotten thanks to ignominy, the shadow of the first two Alien movies, and its botched production, Se7en has persevered for almost twenty years if for no other reason than what’s in the fucking box.  Se7en is where David Fincher‘s filmography truly begins, and it’s fitting that a director who self-identifies as cynical should lead with a movie that abhors human nature, massacres the good in more ways than one, and even feels slight reverence towards its heinous killer.  There’s a beauty to the cruelty as the movie presents a stylized realism that taps into a rotting, fetid world but does so without establishing a particular locale, drenching the unnamed city in rain, and sinking the shots into darkness and low angles.

Se7en is where David Fincher finally got to come out and play.  Alien 3 was a trap that became a prison and eventually he just had to flee from the depressing hellhole of that production.  He returned to music videos thinking he would never make another movie again, and when Se7en came along, he went all in on a “meditation on evil and how evil gets on you and you can’t get it off.”   Fincher didn’t return with an open palm.  He came back with a clenched fist.

The Films of David Fincher: ALIEN 3

by     Posted 90 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

“It was a baptism by fire.” David Fincher doesn’t have particularly fond memories of his directorial debut, Alien 3.  It was a troubled production before he even came on board, and despite his wealth of experience having worked on music videos and commercials, he was thrown into a situation that would easily scare away experienced feature film directors.  Call it hubris on Fincher’s part, but the hellish production on Alien 3 was a key part of his development.  And yet despite all of the problems on set, Alien 3 is not without its redeeming aspects.

The Work of David Fincher: Introduction, Commercials, Music Videos, and THE BEAT OF THE LIVE DRUM

by     Posted 91 days ago

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In an age where movies are designed to appeal to the broadest demographic possible and no one wants to feel too uncomfortable, David Fincher has gone against the grain time and time again, but his work is consistently engaging.  “I don’t know how much movies should entertain. To me, I’m always interested in movies that scar,” he told The Independent in 2010.  Known for his exacting, precise, and unique approach on-set, Fincher has consistently pushed boundaries with films that are divisive, thought-provoking, biting, and yet, for all their cynicism, strangely heartfelt.

In anticipation of the release of David Fincher’s latest film, Gone Girl, I’ll be looking back at his career and filmography.  In this first installment, I’ll be examining his work in commercials, music videos, and his first movie, Rick Springfield’s concert picture The Beat of the Live Drum.

Listen to a Track from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ GONE GIRL Score; Plus 9 New Images

by     Posted 92 days ago

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October 3rd seems so close and yet so far away.  Gone Girl is hands down my most anticipated film of the rest of the year, not because of the story or source material, but because David Fincher is one of the few truly uncompromising filmmakers we have left.  When the film hits theaters, we’ll know that this is Fincher’s film through and through, and he seems to have a lot to say about relationships and our inherent narcissistic nature in the telling of this story.  Another reason to be excited about Gone Girl is the score by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross.  The duo’s work on The Social Network is one of the vital pieces that makes that movie a masterpiece, and while their Girl with the Dragon Tattoo score was a bit too similar-sounding to Social Network for my taste, I’m incredibly curious to see what they’ve come up with for Gone Girl.  And I’m in luck, because the very first Gone Girl soundtrack clip has been released online, and it teases a very different—yet still haunting—kind of score.  Is that a copy machine I hear?

Take a listen to the first Gone Girl soundtrack clip from Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross after the jump, along with some new images from the film.  Starring Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Tyler PerryCarrie CoonKim DickensPatrick FugitScoot McNairyMissi PyleCasey WilsonEmily Ratajkowski, and Neil Patrick Harris, Gone Girl will premiere at the New York Film Festival and opens in theaters on October 3rd.

New GONE GIRL TV Spot Tortures Ben Affleck’s Nick Dunne

by     Posted 93 days ago

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Can’t it just be October 3rd already?  I already know Gone Girl will be good because I’ve never disliked a David Fincher movie and I love the book by Gillian Flynn.  But I’m starting to be more and more convinced this will be one of Fincher’s major works.  For me his best stuff is Seven, Fight Club, Zodiac and The Social Network (with The Game, Panic Room, Benjamin Button and The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo all being very good but not all time greats).  My money is on this new one joining the upper ranks.  This new TV Spot doesn’t diminish any of that and focusses on the tribulations of Ben Affleck‘s character (be sure to check out the trailer first if you haven’t seen it).

Hit the jump to take a look at the new Gone Girl TV Spot.  The film also stars Rosamund PikeTyler PerryCarrie CoonKim DickensPatrick FugitScoot McNairyMissi PyleCasey WilsonEmily Ratajkowski, and Neil Patrick Harris.  Gone Girl will premiere at this year’s New York Film Festival, and will open nationwide on October 3rd.

David Fincher Says Corporate Culture Killed 20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA; Will Be Focusing on HBO Series All Next Year [Updated]

by     Posted 96 days ago

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Sometimes I think it would be cool to see a genius like David Fincher tackle something like a remake of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The project had been in the works at Disney for years, and at one point it seemed pretty close to happening.  But, according to Fincher, it was corporate culture that killed this big-budget behemoth.  Not a huge surprise at that level of expenditure.

I’m not too bummed about losing this particular project, and I do think Fincher’s version is lost whether or not Disney moves ahead with their own.  It would have been cool, but now we’re getting Gone Girl, a movie I’m infinitely more excited about than I would have been about 20,000 Leagues. Still, his comments on the matter are more than worth checking out, as they’re largely representative of a studio culture in which domestic ancillary revenue is on the wane (thanks pirates) and foreign markets must be relied on to break even. [Update: We've added more from Fincher, including a fantastic-sounding description of what his 20,000 Leagues would have entailed and the revelation that he'll be focusing solely on his upcoming HBO series Utopia next year.]

David Fincher Says He Cast Ben Affleck in GONE GIRL for His Experience with Public Scrutiny; Talks Walking a Satirical Line

by     Posted 97 days ago

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Director David Fincher’s Gone Girl is my most anticipated film from the rest of 2014.  I like Gillian Flynn’s book well enough, but it seems to be a fantastic foundation on which Fincher could build something truly special.  As the film’s October 3rd release date looms closer, we’ve started hearing rumblings about what Fincher’s adaptation entails, including more than a few mentions of the word “satire”. The filmmaker recently took part in an interview for the film in which he was candid about his tonal aspirations and why he cast Ben Affleck in the lead role.

Specifically, Fincher admits that Affleck’s experience of being under public scrutiny was an invaluable resource for playing the character of Nick Dunne—a man who becomes the prime suspect in his wife’s disappearance—and also discusses how the crux of the film is about “the idea of our collective narcissism as it relates to coupling.”  Read on after the jump.

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