Netflix Expands Adult Animated Content Slate with ‘Paradise, P.D.’ from ‘Brickleberry’ Team

     April 4, 2018

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Netflix’s current adult animation slate includes such surprisingly profound series as Big Mouth, BoJack Horseman and the recently announced Tuca & Bertie, but a brand new comedy series is in the works. The streaming-content giant today announced that they’ve greenlit Paradise, P.D., a new adult animated comedy series from Roger Black and Waco O’Guin, better known as the co-creators of Brickleberry. That series followed the outrageous exploits of National Park forest rangers, but as you might have guessed, the new title takes aim at some small-town, “backwater Southern-fried” police officers

Arriving later this year, with an order of 10 half-hour episodes, Paradise, P.D. is produced by Odenkirk Provissiero Entertainment with animation courtesy of Bento Box. The official logline is as follows:

They’re bad cops. Not bad like no nonsense. Not bad like cool. Bad like shitty. Paradise PD: They’re the worst responders. From the creators of Brickleberry comes this take on a small-town police department.

Here’s a look at the characters and their associated voice cast (from left to right):

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Image via Netflix

  • Stanley Hopson – Dana Snyder (Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Squidbillies)
  • Gerald Fitzgerald – Cedric Yarbrough (Speechless)
  • Kevin Crawford – Dave Herman (Brickleberry, Bob’s Burgers)
  • Chief Randall Crawford – Tom Kenny (Spongebob Squarepants)
  • Gina Jabowski – Sarah Chalke (Roseanne, Scrubs, Rick & Morty)
  • Bullet (dog) – Kyle Kinane (The Standups)
  • Dusty Marlow – Dana Snyder (Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Squidbillies)

I’m not expecting Paradise, P.D. to be on par with the Emmy-nominated BoJack Horseman or even the unexpectedly poignant, self-reflective and unabashed humor of Big Mouth, but I am expecting to see something close to Comedy Central’s Brickleberry series for obvious reasons. Will the Netflix model allow the creators a bit more freedom when it comes to the production process, or will it simply effect viewers who will get a chance to take in the full, 10-episode first season in one shot? Time will tell, but more diversity of content for the already-massive library is definitely a selling point. Be sure to let us know if you’re curious to check out Paradise, P.D. later this year!

Television