Roger Deakins Wins American Society of Cinematographers’ Feature Film Award for SKYFALL

by     Posted 1 year, 164 days ago

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If you need more proof that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is insane, look no further than Roger Deakins.  Deakins is one of the greatest cinematographers of all-time, and before this year, he had racked up nine Oscar nominations without ever taking home the statue.  He picked up his tenth nomination this year for Skyfall, and tonight he won the Feature Film Award from the American Society of Cinematographers.  It was his third award from the ASC after having won in 1995 for The Shawkshank Redemption and in 2002 for The Man Who Wasn’t There.  He also received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the ASC in 2011.  Oscar prognosticators are still putting Life of Pi as the favorite to win Best Cinematography, but perhaps tenth time will be the charm for Deakins.

Hit the jump for the press release.  The 85th Academy Awards will be held on February 24th at 7pm EST on ABC.

Here’s the press release:

skyfall-imax-posterLOS ANGELES – Roger Deakins, ASC, BSC; Balazs Bolygo, HSC; Kramer Morgenthau, ASC; Florian Hoffmeister; and Bradford Lipson claimed top honors in the four competitive categories at the 27th Annual American Society of Cinematographers (ASC) Awards for Outstanding Achievement, which was held here tonight at the Grand Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland.

Deakins won the ASC Award in the feature film competition for SKYFALL. Bolygo and Morgenthau tied in the one-hour television episodic category for Cinemax’s HUNTED and HBO’s GAME OF THRONES, respectively. Hoffmeister won the TV movie/miniseries award for PBS’ GREAT EXPECTATIONS, and Lipson was the recipient of the half-hour television episodic category for FX’s WILFRED.

The ASC Award for best feature was presented by Emmy®-nominated actor John Slattery. Deakins, who was regrettably not able to attend, has previously won ASC Awards for THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION (1995) and THE MAN WHO WASN’T THERE (2002). His other ASC nominations include FARGO (1997), KUNDUN (1998), O BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU? (2001), NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN (2008), THE ASSASSINATION OF JESSE JAMES BY THE COWARD ROBERT FORD (2008), REVOLUTIONARY ROAD (2009), THE READER (2009), and TRUE GRIT (2011). He also received the organization’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2011.

The other nominees in the feature film category were Seamus McGarvey, ASC, BSC (ANNA KARENINA), Danny Cohen, BSC (LES MISERABLES), Claudio Miranda, ASC (LIFE OF PI), and Janusz Kaminski (LINCOLN).

Actor David Zayas, also known as Sgt. Batista on DEXTER, announced Bolygo and Morgenthau had tied for the Outstanding Achievement Award in the one-hour television category. This is the first tie in ASC Awards history.

Bolygo, a first-time ASC nominee, won for the “Mort” episode of HUNTED. This is the first win for Morgenthau, who has been previously nominated for THE FIVE PEOPLE YOU MEET IN HEAVEN (2005), LIFE ON MARS (2009) and BOARDWALK EMPIRE (2011). Tonight’s award is for the GAME OF THRONES episode “The North Remembers.”

The other nominees in the one-hour television episodic series category were Christopher Manley, ASC for AMC’s MAD MEN (“The Phantom”), David Moxness, CSC for FOX’s FRINGE (“Letters of Transit”), Mike Spragg for Cinemax’s STRIKE BACK (Episode 11) and David Stockton, ASC for FOX’s ALCATRAZ (Pilot).

skyfall roger deakinsOscar®-nominee Mary McDonnell presented the Television Movie/Miniseries Award to first-time ASC nominee Hoffmeister for the PBS Masterpiece presentation of GREAT EXPECTATIONS.

Nominated along with Hoffmeister were Michael Goi, ASC for FX’s AMERICAN HORROR STORY: ASYLUM (“I am Anne Frank: Part 2”), Arthur Reinhart for History Channel’s HATFIELDS & MCCOYS, and Rogier Stoffers, ASC for HBO’s HEMINGWAY & GELLHORN.

TWO BROKE GIRLS’ Matthew Moy presented the half-hour television category award to Lipson, who was a first-time ASC nominee for the “Truth” episode of WILFRED.

Nominated alongside Lipson were Ken Glassing for FOX’s BEN AND KATE (“Guitar Face”), Goi for NBC’s THE NEW NORMAL (“Pilot”), Peter Levy, ASC for Showtime’s HOUSE OF LIES (“Gods of Dangerous Financial Instruments”), and Michael Price for ABC’s HAPPY ENDINGS (“Four Weddings and a Funeral (Minus Three Weddings and One Funeral)”).

Oscar®-winner Angelina Jolie presented the ASC Lifetime Achievement Award to Dean Semler, ASC, ACS who earned an Oscar® and an ASC Award for Kevin Costner’s DANCES WITH WOLVES (1991). In 2007, his work on Mel Gibson’s APOCALYPTO earned him a second ASC Award nomination. Semler’s nearly 70 feature credits include such memorable films as CITY SLICKERS, LAST ACTION HERO, WATERWORLD, THE BONE COLLECTOR, WE WERE SOLDIERS, XXX, BRUCE ALMIGHTY, THE ALAMO, GET SMART, 2012, DATE NIGHT, SECRETARIAT, Jolie’s directorial debut IN THE LAND OF BLOOD AND HONEY, PARENTAL GUIDANCE, and the upcoming MALEFICENT.

The ASC International Award was presented to Robby Müller, NSC, BVK by director Steve McQueen and actress Nastassja Kinski who worked with him on the film PARIS, TEXAS. Kinski noted, “Seeing Robby work on that film made me want to know all about the camera – how it catches light, images, and feelings. How it serves as the window to each film.” Müller was unable to attend the event, and McQueen and Kinski accepted the award on his behalf.

The Career Achievement in Television Award was presented to Rodney Charters, ASC, CSC (24) by Sir Robert Harvey, mayor of Waitakere City in New Zealand.

The ASC Presidents Award was given to Curtis Clark, ASC (THE DRAUGHTSMAN’S CONTRACT) by Stephen Burum, ASC.

Last year, Emmanuel Lubezki, ASC, AMC won the ASC feature award for THE TREE OF LIFE.

The American Society of Cinematographers was chartered in January 1919. There are more than 300 active members of ASC, and 150-plus associate members from sectors of the industry that support the art and craft of filmmaking. Membership and associate membership is by invitation based on contributions that individuals have made to advance the art of visual storytelling.




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  • Bloot

    I’m sorry, but I say this, as a huge Deakins fan and someone who adored Skyfall, that this film didn’t have the best cinematography of 2012. It was way too hampered by the digital camera they used that it ruined Deakins lighting. To me, The Dark Knight Rises, Django Unchained, and The Master had the best cinematography, with The Master being the absolute best. Long live Film!

  • jackjack

    Too bad Deakins wins something for (esentially) a flashy work. Artistically, he did much better in the past. I don’t know if Django is original on any kind of level, TDKR has (in my opinion) only one shot really worth of admiration, although The Master is a top class. Lincoln, The impossible, Amour also come to mind in this case. In contrast to that “Les miserables” shows you how does indeed look a visit in a wooden dunny.

    • tinypony

      I’m curious which shot you liked in TDKR. I thought the best moment was Catwoman on the Batpod bursting onto the frame from the right while chasing one of the trucks.

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  • jackjack

    I’m not sure which one you’re writing about, there were plenty of simmillar shots depicting Selina on the batpod. For me, the most memorable was a picture of her (presumably) leaving and driving into the sunrise. It gives the convincing and unforced sense of scope, mood and drama also it shows what you can do with a camera, if you’re imaginative and have a good taste. For me it’s the best thing about tdkr, thank you Mr Pfister.

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