STAR WARS: EPISODE VIII Director Rian Johnson Teases Overall Direction of the Film

by     Posted 142 days ago

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Last month we got the utterly fantastic news that Rian Johnson will be writing and directing Star Wars: Episode VIII, (in addition to crafting a treatment for Star Wars: Episode IX).  Johnson’s Looper is such an incredibly strong film that I have to imagine there will be a certain amount of quality gained from this if he’s allowed a reasonable amount of control over the project.  While details are still thin on Episode VIII (let’s face it, they’re still thin on Episode VII so I wouldn’t expect this to get better anytime soon) this is a sign that Lucasfilm and Disney are at least somewhat concerned with the stewardship of this franchise as a piece of entertainment (in addition to the obvious interest in it as a brand).

Now Johnson is beginning to tease out some (admittedly vague) thoughts on the project.  Hit the jump for some initial thoughts from Star Wars: Episode 8 director Rian Johnson.

star-wars-episode-8-rian-johnsonPer The Chicago Sun Times Johnson got involved with the project for what seems like the best of reasons:

“The thought of it made me so completely joyfully happy. I wanted to to play in this world, of literally the first movie my dad put me in the car to see.”

Johnson also jabbed a bit at the now-rote talking point that these newer films will have much more in common with the original trilogy than the prequels (though I’m sure that’s the direction he’s headed in anyway):

“With these films, I am trying to harken back to the original ‘Star Wars’ …. Christmas special. We do have Jefferson Starship.”

I’m also intrigued by the fact that he had his crew watch Three O’ Clock High (one of my favorite high school films) to prep for the shoot.  There might not be any connection in terms of material but that film is amazing visually.




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  • Daniel Ronczkowski

    That really doesn’t say much or even the direction.

  • Daniel Ronczkowski

    That really doesn’t say much or even the direction.

  • bork1138

    Can’t help but be far more excited for Ep VIII over abrams’ entry, got a good felling about this, Johnson is an excellent filmmaker

  • scheebles

    So much love/hype for Looper when that’s easily his worst film. It looked fantastic but I couldn’t stand the fact that he placed giant plot holes in the time travel elements and basically told the audience “plot holes don’t matter so eff you.”

    That being said, I LOVE Brothers Bloom and Brick and Johnson is a fantastic filmmaker. Eagerly, eagerly looking forward to VIII.

    • bork1138

      I thought that was great, time travel stories always have plot holes due to their nature. Johnson was smart in saying to the audience ‘don’t get hung up on this and just enjoy the ride’

      • scheebles

        I understood what he was saying, I just thought it was kind of a cheat. The film tries to be mind-bending and creative, but then basically tells anyone that notices the gigantic plot holes that they are spoilsports. If your movie wants us to both think AND feel, then you can’t insult the audience for thinking. Looper just tries to have it’s cake and eat it, too.

      • Brian Jensen

        That’s why i love “Looper.” It’s a thought provocking film that ends up making sense, and doesn’t want it’s audience to think too much. I think it’s Rian Johnson’s greatest achievement. :)

      • scheebles

        It doesn’t make any sense. It uses two separate time travel theories that can’t coexist in order to produce cool images and emotional resonance.

      • Brian Jensen

        But somehow, it all made sense. Which is why it’s such a great film.

      • scheebles

        How did it all make sense? For instance, this is a very small one. If Young Seth is getting his legs cut off, and everything that happens to Young Seth happens to Old Seth, then when Old Seth gets his legs cut off, he would’ve had his legs cut off before he was even sent back in time and couldn’t possibly escape.

        That’s the small one. The big one is that if Old Joe is from an alternate timeline, when he gets sent back in time then he should’ve created yet ANOTHER alternate timeline. Thus, Young Joe killing himself would have done nothing to Old Joe, who is tied to a different “Young Joe”. It doesn’t make any sense.

      • Brian Jensen

        It made sense, because there wasn’t a real explanation. You will lose me with a real expalanation. So Rian Johnson was wise to not explain shit, and just focus on the emotions of the film. That’s also why i love “12 Monkeys.” :)

      • scheebles

        So… it made sense because it doesn’t make sense?

        12 Monkeys actually makes sense, because it sticks to one continuous loop. It sets out its theories on time travel and sticks to them.

      • Brian Jensen

        Yeah, and that’s why i love “Looper”, because everything started to make sense, with the two competiting theories. It’s a time travel film that completely focuses on free will, and unpredictable variables in the Universe. So in the end, the film made sense to me.

      • scheebles

        It’s not an unpredictable variable. The two theories don’t work together at the same time. It literally just uses whatever time travel theory works at the time. Johnson himself has said it. He knows that it only makes sense in the emotional narrative. Which I wouldn’t mind, if there wasn’t so much emphasis put on how the time travel works.

      • Brian Jensen

        It is an unpredictable variable. It’s one of the few time travel films that explores the concept of free will. And that’s why it works.

      • scheebles

        Um. A TON of time travel movies address the idea of free will. Free will has NOTHING to do with why these two can’t exist at the same time.

        This movie can’t decide what time travel is. (Actually, it just wants to use whatever will make the decisions more emotional) Young Joe killing himself would not affect THAT version of Old Joe because THAT version of Old Joe created an alternate timeline by not getting killed.

      • Brian Jensen

        “Looper” did decide what type of time travel film it is. It’s just different, and it’s not predictable. Which is why it’s a great film. The film explores the concept of free will, in an original way that made sense. Most time travel films don’t explore free will.

      • scheebles

        Almost every time travel movie addresses free will. As I’ve said, free will has nothing to do with why the film doesn’t work. Can you explain to me why Young Joe killing himself would erase the Old Joe that came from a different timeline? Honestly, if you can is be interested to hear it.

        I don’t care if you like the movie, that’s fine. But even the director admits that it doesn’t add up. My problem was that it emphasized the fact that there are rules to time travel and then told us that the rules don’t matter. That to me is annoying.

      • Brian Jensen

        Most time travel films do not explore free will. And it’s great to see a time travel film that doesn’t give a shit. Which is why “Looper” was great. You’re just taking the film too seriously. Why so serious? Lol!

      • Brian Jensen

        Most time travel films do not explore free will. And it’s great to see a time travel film that doesn’t give a shit. Which is why “Looper” was great. You’re just taking the film too seriously. Why so serious? Lol!

      • James

        Your problem is in imagining that time travel necessarily results in “time splitting” or “parallel universes”. If you reject the notion that time travel results in “new dimensions” or “alternate realities” you get the (meta)physics of Looper, which operates on an ‘uncertainty’ principle where both physical and mental (loss of memories) alterations have an ongoing effect on the individual who is “out of time” – which, frankly, makes complete sense within the terms of the films narrative, and Johnson handles with great care.

      • scheebles

        That’s not what Johnson has said. Johnson has said that it only makes sense because on an emotional level it would fit the themes of the story. He specifically said that he envisioned explaining it through multiple timelines. Which doesn’t work with the causality set up in the film. Like I said, if you don’t care about it, then you enjoyed the film. I felt like they lingered too much on HOW it worked for me to not care.

      • James

        This is BS! In an interview with Kevin Smith on Smoviemakers (or whatever Smith’s blog is called) Johnson maintains that there are no holes in the films narrative and – while he does comment on visual and emotional storytelling by making reference specifically to the disappearing family photo in ‘Back to the Future’ – he had brought Shane Carruth into the writers room to comment on the physics of his movie. So I categorically disagree with the statement that Johnson himself has disavowed the credibility of his script.

      • scheebles

        “That’s the Terminator question. If it’s important to you to really justify that beyond ‘It makes sense in a story type way,’ you’ll have to get into multiple time lines existing in neverending loops of logic. You can shoehorn it into making sense.”– Rian Johnson

      • James

        This is the case for every time travel movie ever made. Time travel is physically impossible – and barring some paradigmatic breakthrough in wormhole or dark matter physics – it will remain that way. Each film maker who engages the subject matter has to deal with the paradoxical and irreconcilable nature of performing time travel.

        In order for time travel to have real world consequences for the characters of Looper, Johnson does away with the common ‘parallel universes’ theory and opts for a different metaphysics. This is all that is needed for the suspension of disbelief and does not infer major plot holes. That is all I am trying to say!

      • scheebles

        I get what you’re trying to say. But then Johnson himself says that the only way to explain it is parallel universes! lol! All I’m saying is the movie spends far too much time (the first half) focusing on how time travel works. Then we’re supposed to shift on a dime to not care and focus on the emotional core. And I don’t think it works. I don’t care about Cid, mostly because I just spent an hour thinking about how it all works before Bruce Willis told me that I was annoying for asking. lmao

      • James

        Johnson says in the Smith interview that Bruce Willis’ line in the diner isn’t intended to infer that Johnson himself didn’t contemplate the full mechanics of time travel in the movie. But I hear you! I think Looper is Rian’s most ambitious movie, and he nails it. It gets better every time I watch it (the subtle hints at a much wider feedback loop than just Joe-to-Joe are really exciting to think about!)

        Anyways, if you like Rian’s movies and are as excited as I am about him on Episode’s 8 and 9, you should honestly check out Smith’s smoviemakers interview with him. They talk about all three of his movies, his film school background, how his family loaned him the money to make Brick, working with Bruce Willis, shaking up the time travel genre with Looper and just loads and loads more – I think it’s like 3 or 4 hours long!

      • James

        The second problem with people imagining that there are “glaring” plot holes in this movie is in imagining that “young” Joe’s actions have priority in the temporal feedback loop – when in fact, the actions/decisions which “Young” Joe is making are dependent on “Old” Joe having come back in time in the first place – “Old” Joe’s actions have an impact on his younger self which “require” his presence in his own “Young” life. Again, this is the typical time-travel paradox which Rian Johnson has chosen to resolve in a way which is made CRYSTAL clear to the audience.

        Whether or not you disagree with his choice is a matter of opinion, and I am perfectly willing to admit that it is convoluted, paradoxical, elliptical, dialectic (or whatever other word you want to use) – but to claim that Johnson’s film insults your (or our) intelligence is, frankly, insulting to the filmmakers intelligence; since it is clear that he has put an incredible effort into making this time travel genre film work to the best of his (or dare I say, anyone’s) ability!

      • scheebles

        Actually, Johnson himself has said that the time travel mechanics don’t really matter to him and that if you have to make sense of it beyond the emotional core then that’s your business and you can find away. So I’m not just pulling it out of my ass when I say that he really didn’t care about the mechanics beyond what they could visually/emotionally do for his story.

      • James

        Young Seth wouldn’t have had his legs cut off unless Old Seth had come back in time and escaped. The consequences of the mistake play out in the present for both incarnations of Seth, ONLY because the both of them were involved in the others demise.

        I can understand how this is paradoxical and elleptical, but it is an elegant way of dealing with the paradox which is (as far as I can tell) unique to Johnson’s film.

      • Norrtron

        Jesus dude write a fucking novel why don’t you? The technicalities don’t matter, you could pick apart ANY time travel movie, but guess what? TIME TRAVEL ISN’T REAL!!!! MOVIES AREN’T REAL!! As long as the movie clearly outlines it’s rules and follows them then it’s not “cheating”.

      • the king of comedy

        I can`t believe you people are having this discussion, time travel is not suppossed to work the same way you saw in other movies, time travel does not exist and for this reasson a filmaker can create their own laws for his movie, in here there isn`t suppossed to be a different timeline where everything that happens to a younger self doesn`t affect the older self, and it`s not a loop either where anything you make doesn`t matter because it won`t change the future, in here time travel is a concept that even people who use it don`t completely understand and hence it`s dangerous, takes you to a reality in wich you coexist with a younger self in the same time, it is a different timeline but with two bodies sharing the same being and where anything that happens to the young self doesn´t inmediatly affect everything that happened to the older self, but only affects to the older self sharing the same time. It`s not a plot hole, it`s a law of this movie and one I can buy, great movie.

      • the king of comedy

        I can`t believe you people are having this discussion, time travel is not suppossed to work the same way you saw in other movies, time travel does not exist and for this reasson a filmaker can create their own laws for his movie, in here there isn`t suppossed to be a different timeline where everything that happens to a younger self doesn`t affect the older self, and it`s not a loop either where anything you make doesn`t matter because it won`t change the future, in here time travel is a concept that even people who use it don`t completely understand and hence it`s dangerous, takes you to a reality in wich you coexist with a younger self in the same time, it is a different timeline but with two bodies sharing the same being and where anything that happens to the young self doesn´t inmediatly affect everything that happened to the older self, but only affects to the older self sharing the same time. It`s not a plot hole, it`s a law of this movie and one I can buy, great movie.

      • scheebles

        How did it all make sense? For instance, this is a very small one. If Young Seth is getting his legs cut off, and everything that happens to Young Seth happens to Old Seth, then when Old Seth gets his legs cut off, he would’ve had his legs cut off before he was even sent back in time and couldn’t possibly escape.

        That’s the small one. The big one is that if Old Joe is from an alternate timeline, when he gets sent back in time then he should’ve created yet ANOTHER alternate timeline. Thus, Young Joe killing himself would have done nothing to Old Joe, who is tied to a different “Young Joe”. It doesn’t make any sense.

      • Brian Jensen

        But somehow, it all made sense. Which is why it’s such a great film.

      • Steven Ray Morris

        It’s a movie!

      • scheebles

        It’s a movie that asks us to think about time travel and causality and then tells us not to worry too much about it. It’s not playing by its own rules.

      • Brian Jensen

        And that’s a problem? I actually love originality. That’s why “Looper” was great. It didn’t follow it’s own rules.

      • scheebles

        I can’t tell if you’re being serious or being a troll. If you’re being a troll, then that’s a hilarious comment. If you’re not… then I have sympathy.

      • Brian Jensen

        Maybe you’re being the troll, because you’re not paying attention to what I’m saying. I love.the film for the same reasons that bothered you. It’s called an opinion.

      • theinkisdry

        and therein lies the entire fallacy of the Marvel Cinematic Universe as well- 2/3rds of a good film that makes you think followed by a 3rd act that actually makes you dumber-

      • Brian Jensen

        That’s why i love “Looper.” It’s a thought provocking film that ends up making sense, and doesn’t want it’s audience to think too much. I think it’s Rian Johnson’s greatest achievement. :)

      • Guest

        you are right, it is his worst film by far. It felt like he wrote 2/3rds of a great film and figured out how to utilize the money and then the studio decided not to fund the last 3rd so he rewrote it to make with little money- too bad he didn’t write it the same way he wrote Brick with no money- Hell, Brick has Print Shop made banners that acted as store front signs for certain sets and it didn’t matter because the story and story telling was so solid-

      • Norrtron

        Rian Johnsons “worst” movie is still better then 95% of the movies Hollywood churns out.

      • scheebles

        I understood what he was saying, I just thought it was kind of a cheat. The film tries to be mind-bending and creative, but then basically tells anyone that notices the gigantic plot holes that they are spoilsports. If your movie wants us to both think AND feel, then you can’t insult the audience for thinking. Looper just tries to have it’s cake and eat it, too.

    • bork1138

      I thought that was great, time travel stories always have plot holes due to their nature. Johnson was smart in saying to the audience ‘don’t get hung up on this and just enjoy the ride’

    • Kyle Chandler

      He also made one of the best Breaking Bad episodes. I think he’ll do great!

      Also, Brick was fantastic.

      • Matt1

        Ozymandias was my overall favorite episode of Breaking Bad. It’s the one where all the shit hits the fan, and the emotional impact was amazing!

      • Matt1

        Ozymandias was my overall favorite episode of Breaking Bad. It’s the one where all the shit hits the fan, and the emotional impact was amazing!

    • Kyle Chandler

      He also made one of the best Breaking Bad episodes. I think he’ll do great!

      Also, Brick was fantastic.

    • Dan_K

      I had less of an issue with the plot holes, as I kind of feel like time-travel plots just invite that degree of speculation and thus, I’m willing to overlook them if the film is done well. Where I think you really hit the nail on the head is with your comments about the film wanting you to think AND feel. I was very into the first half of the film, less so in the second. It’s a shame because the performances were uniformly excellent, especially JGL doing a scary good Bruce impression.

      All of this is to say, I wholeheartedly agree that Looper is his weakest film. Brick is my favorite, by a long shot. It’s one of my favorite films of the last decade. His involvement in VIII shot my interest up considerably.

      • scheebles

        I agree with you, as well. I should’ve clarified that what drove me nuts about the plot holes is that the film was inconsistent about it’s purpose. Take a film like Equilibrium. It has a million plot holes, but it also knows that it’s an unsophisticated excuse for some shallow emotion and terrific action. It lingers on the things it tries to sell: action and enterainment. Looper shoves the plot holes in our face and tells us NOT to worry about them and then shoves more in our face. It lingers on the the plot elements and invites us to take them apart, but then criticizes us for finding all its flaws and redirects us with an “emotional” bend that wasn’t really present in the first part of the film.

      • Dan_K

        Very well said. Equilibrium is a great example, too. To your point, I think the plot holes would have worked against the film a lot less (for my viewing pleasure) if it had stuck to one or the other rather than trying to have its cake and eat it too. It’s interesting, because I think Brick and Bloom both made a strong case for the guy having pretty terrific writing dexterity as far as balancing plot and emotional payoff. Time travel is the great equalizer! Incidentally, Willis was in the only time travel movie that I’ve found really stands up to scrutiny (12 Monkeys). It can’t be a coincidence that he gave two of his better performances in both films (particularly Looper; dude has looked like he is sleepwalking a lot for awhile, but he looked ALIVE in this. It was great to see).

      • scheebles

        The performances were top notch, the action inventive, the direction engaging, the cinematography beautiful. The script was just unfocused.

      • Dan_K

        Very well said. Equilibrium is a great example, too. To your point, I think the plot holes would have worked against the film a lot less (for my viewing pleasure) if it had stuck to one or the other rather than trying to have its cake and eat it too. It’s interesting, because I think Brick and Bloom both made a strong case for the guy having pretty terrific writing dexterity as far as balancing plot and emotional payoff. Time travel is the great equalizer! Incidentally, Willis was in the only time travel movie that I’ve found really stands up to scrutiny (12 Monkeys). It can’t be a coincidence that he gave two of his better performances in both films (particularly Looper; dude has looked like he is sleepwalking a lot for awhile, but he looked ALIVE in this. It was great to see).

      • Fabdex

        That, my friend, is the definition of “bullshit”.

      • Fabdex

        That, my friend, is the definition of “bullshit”.

    • Dan_K

      I had less of an issue with the plot holes, as I kind of feel like time-travel plots just invite that degree of speculation and thus, I’m willing to overlook them if the film is done well. Where I think you really hit the nail on the head is with your comments about the film wanting you to think AND feel. I was very into the first half of the film, less so in the second. It’s a shame because the performances were uniformly excellent, especially JGL doing a scary good Bruce impression.

      All of this is to say, I wholeheartedly agree that Looper is his weakest film. Brick is my favorite, by a long shot. It’s one of my favorite films of the last decade. His involvement in VIII shot my interest up considerably.

    • GrimReaper07

      Plot holes are so completely overrated. I don’t think they’ve ever lessened my enjoyment of any film except TDKR.

      • lord jim

        i didn´t find the plotholes in tdkr as stupid and fucked up as this plothole in the dark knight:what happened to the joker and wayne´s guests after batman saved rachel?did the joker stop carying about dent and the other hostages and just went home by chopper, while batman was waiting at the front door?that was one big fuck you to the audience.

      • GrimReaper07

        Yeah that was the big plot hole in TDK but it’s the only big one I can think of and I can let it pass because the rest of the movie is so good. TDKR has an immense amount of big plot holes which admittedly did turn me off a bit. That said I still like the movie, even if it’s by far the worst of the three. It’s got a couple of moments that are absolutely amazing that even out the really stupid ones.

      • GrimReaper07

        Yeah that was the big plot hole in TDK but it’s the only big one I can think of and I can let it pass because the rest of the movie is so good. TDKR has an immense amount of big plot holes which admittedly did turn me off a bit. That said I still like the movie, even if it’s by far the worst of the three. It’s got a couple of moments that are absolutely amazing that even out the really stupid ones.

    • Vulcan

      I feel like every time travel movie has giant plot holes and can become convoluted if you think about them long enough. It just kind of goes to show that time travel theory is impossible. But the rest of the movie was very well done in my opinion.

      • scheebles

        As I clarified, I don’t have a problem with plot holes in time travel movies. I had a problem with Looper poking us in the face with the craziness of time travel and then basically telling us not to focus on it. As I said, you can’t have it both ways.

      • Brian Jensen

        Well with “Looper”, it did have it both ways. Lol!

      • Tactician

        Name one plot hole in Primer. It has the most up to date theory of time travel and sticks to it perfectly. It is the best time travel movie of all time, the best sci fi movie in the 2000s.

      • Tactician

        Name one plot hole in Primer. It has the most up to date theory of time travel and sticks to it perfectly. It is the best time travel movie of all time, the best sci fi movie in the 2000s.

  • scheebles

    So much love/hype for Looper when that’s easily his worst film. It looked fantastic but I couldn’t stand the fact that he placed giant plot holes in the time travel elements and basically told the audience “plot holes don’t matter so eff you.”

    That being said, I LOVE Brothers Bloom and Brick and Johnson is a fantastic filmmaker. Eagerly, eagerly looking forward to VIII.

  • Stronger

    This star wars ripoff is going to be shit. Fuck this guy and abrams. they obviously now that the new one is shit and they aint even trying on this next one. fuck it. they just wnat your money you dumb sheep shit

    • MCP

      Derka?!?! Oh, derka, derka. Well, derka derka, derka doo.
      Derp…

      • Stronger

        what the fuck does that mean? you don’t even hav e a real response so my point i sproven. i fucking win

      • MCP

        So sorry, I was speaking the language of idiot and I figured you would of understood. Ig uess Is houldt pel ikey ourf uckingr etardeda ssd oes.

      • MJ

        Yea, I thought that dumb-ass moron would understand that as well. Guess not. His primary skill here is finding different ways to F-bomb…LOL…what a: LOSER !!!

      • eternalozzie

        I have cookies in my lungs now because MCP made me laugh so hard :)

      • Person who Helps

        Sorry dude, but that’s not how debate is won. You can’t just decide you win.

      • Stronger

        what the fuck does that mean? you don’t even hav e a real response so my point i sproven. i fucking win

    • MCP

      Derka?!?! Oh, derka, derka. Well, derka derka, derka doo.
      Derp…

    • apeknows

      here, grab a snickers.

  • Fabdex

    I fucking hated the stoopid script to Looper. Let’s hope he does better this time…

  • Fabdex

    I fucking hated the stoopid script to Looper. Let’s hope he does better this time…

  • enderandrew

    Crappy click-bait headline. If he basically said nothing, then why write an article?

    • Thommy

      Because Evan Dickson is Matt Goldberg and he is a Rian fan and it explains the usage of the lines like “utterly fantastic news” and “such an incredibly strong film that I have to imagine there will be a certain amount of quality gained from this”…

  • MJ

    Why is Dwight from The Office directing a major Star Wars movie?

  • apeknows

    The man can direct … loved Looper and every episode of Breaking Bad (obviously). Sounds promising!!

  • Stibbs

    It’s Twelve O’Clock High. Not Three.

  • Reggie

    I believe the original report said that Johnson said he watched “Twelve O’Clock High” not “Three O’Clock High”. Lol those are two very different films.

    • 80sRobot

      12 O’Clock High makes more sense in the context of a Star Wars movie.

  • DEADP00L

    NNNNNNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!

    • scheebles

      You know who should be in this? Deadpool.

      • DEADP00L

        Why do you hate me? I’m a nice guy when I’m not after you.

      • scheebles

        I honestly think that if you put Deadpool in anything, he will make it better.

      • DEADP00L

        ..This feels like a trap. I warn you I’m good with a spoon.

      • scheebles

        I honestly think that if you put Deadpool in anything, he will make it better.

      • DEADP00L

        Why do you hate me? I’m a nice guy when I’m not after you.

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  • dolphin558

    I don’t recall this much love for Looper when it came out.

    • SenorApplesauce

      Looper was dumb. They spent all this time in the movie letting you and the character know that what happens in the past happens to the person in the future. He should have just shot his hand off that was holding the gun.

      • Paul2k2b1

        agreed, looper wasnt epic at all, watched it once, then didnt think about it again after

      • Paul2k2b1

        agreed, looper wasnt epic at all, watched it once, then didnt think about it again after

  • Strong Enough

    Looper script. sucked. bad.

  • SubSumeYou

    [shrugs]

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