GONE GIRL Is Now David Fincher’s Highest Grossing Film Domestically

by     Posted 24 days ago

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In case you needed further proof that Gone Girl is a bona fide hit, the film has now become director David Fincher’s highest grossing film on the domestic charts.  With a domestic total of $127.8 million and climbing, the satirical thriller has surpassed Fincher’s previous victor of the domestic charts, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, which topped out at $127.5 million.  It’s an impressive feat to be sure, and while anticipation was certainly high due to the popularity of author Gillian Flynn’s novel, it helps that Fincher’s film manages to be wildly entertaining, bitingly funny, and somewhat terrifying at the same time.  So where does Gone Girl rank in relation to Fincher’s filmography on the worldwide charts, and how does Fincher’s oeuvre fall in line as a whole?  Find out after the jump.

Watch David Fincher and the Cast of GONE GIRL Talk Multiple Takes, Audience Reaction, and How Fincher Deals with Cell Phones on Set

by     Posted 46 days ago

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Gone Girl has finally been unleashed on general audiences, and after seeing it this weekend I count it as one of my favorite films of the year.  It’s bitingly funny, wickedly sharp satire, but above all it’s tremendously entertaining.  If you’re a fan of director David Fincher you’ve probably already read a number of interviews with the filmmaker about his Gillian Flynn adaptation by now, but a series of loose, uncensored video interviews with Fincher, Flynn, and the cast of Gone Girl has been released online via Cinemax and they’re a must-watch.  The conversation amongst the ensemble is really funny, with Rosamund Pike relating how Fincher reacted to catching her on her cell phone and the entire cast talking about how freeing it was to do many, many takes under Fincher’s direction.  There are also a couple more behind-the-scenes stories illuminated that illicit big laughs from all.

Hit the jump to watch the Gone Girl video interviews, and click here to read Matt’s review.  The film is now playing in theaters everywhere.

THE COLLISION: Episode 106 – David Fincher and GONE GIRL

by     Posted 49 days ago

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This week on The Collision, we’re joined by Perri and Evan to talk about David Fincher and Gone Girl.  During this spoiler-heavy episode, we discuss why the movie works so well, how it compares to Fincher’s other movies, his development as a director, how the film differs from the book, and much more.  As always, we finish up with our recommendations.

Click here to listen to the new episode of The Collision, click here for the previous episode (“The Boxtrolls and Laika”), click here to add the podcast to your RSS, and click here to find us on iTunes. To keep up to date with The Collision, you can follow us on Twitter at @MattGoldberg, @AdamChitwood, @PNemiroff, and @Evan Dickson.

The TRUE DETECTIVE Effect: Why Filmmakers Are Flocking to Long-Form Storytelling

by     Posted 49 days ago

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It’s no secret that we’ve been living in the “Golden Age of Television” for some time now, going back to the early days of The Sopranos and The Wire.  The quality has remained high over the past decade or so, but as with all forms of media, it has evolved with the times.  Story is still king and the abundance of cable networks have allowed a wide variety of stories to be told on a number of different canvases: a five-season long character transformation on Breaking Bad, a dense and obtuse period study on Mad Men, a twist on the “procedural thriller” formula on Homeland, and even a unique take on the horror genre with Penny Dreadful.  However, in addition to the high quality and the sheer enormity of solid programming on display, a new trend has begun to take shape thanks to HBO’s tremendous True Detective.

That series was an oddity in that one filmmaker—Cary Joji Fukunaga—directed every single episode, resulting in the kind of singularity of vision and artistry usually reserved for feature films.  And now, based on True Detective’s success with the experiment, highly revered directors like David Fincher, Steven Soderbergh, and David Lynch are throwing their hats into the ring. 

Weekend Box Office: Tight Race as GONE GIRL Edges Out ANNABELLE with $38 Million

by     Posted 50 days ago

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We told you yesterday that this weekend’s two big releases, Gone Girl and Annabelle, would come out strong but that David Fincher’s drama would come out on top.  That’s exactly how it played out, though the estimates for the two films were much closer than expected.  Annabelle, a prequel to last year’s The Conjuring, had a better Saturday hold than your typical horror franchise feature, earning an estimated $37.2 million for the three day frame.  Fox’s Gone Girl estimate is only slightly higher at $38 million.  This is good news for both films but great news for the box office, which is trying to bounce back from September’s near-record lows.

 Title Weekend Total
1.  Gone Girl $38,000,000 $38
2.  Annabelle $37,200,000 $37.2
3.  The Equalizer $19,000,000 $64.5
4.  The Boxtrolls $12,425,000 $32.5
5.  The Maze Runner $12,000,000 $73.9
6.  Left Behind $6,850,000 $6.8
7.  This Is Where I Leave You $4,000,000 $29
8.  Dolphin Tale 2 $3,530,000 $37.9
9.  Guardians of the Galaxy $3,034,000 $323.3
10.  No Good Deed $2,500,000 $50.1

 

Full story after the jump.

TOP 5: GONE GIRL, INHERENT VICE, New INTERSTELLAR Trailer, AMERICAN SNIPER, Most Anticipated: October to December

by     Posted 51 days ago

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Halloween season is upon us and to celebrate I’ll be recommending horror pics I’ve seen recently that I think merit a view in each Top 5 installment this month. This week my recommendation goes to writer/director Mike Flanagan‘s Oculus. The film hit theaters back in April where it enjoyed solid box office returns and critical success alike. While not overly frightening, Oculus is an effective, unsettling picture thanks in large part to Flanagan’s editing which expertly weaves present day and past events together in a way that makes the outcome(s) feel inevitable yet satisfying. Watching Karen Gillan and Brenton Thwaites‘ terrifying past and present unfold concurrently could have easily discombobulated the narrative. Instead, the transitions not only feel smooth but they add tremendous tension and empathy for the brother and sister. More psychological horror than gore fest (although it’s not completely void of tough to watch moments), Oculus is absolutely deserving of a spot on your All Hallows’ Eve watch list.

Recommendations aside, this week’s edition features Matt’s Gone Girl review and the conclusion of his David Fincher retrospective, the first trailer for Paul Thomas Anderson‘s Inherent Vice, a new Interstellar trailer, a breathtaking first trailer for Clint Eastwood‘s American Sniper, and a look at our most anticipated movies for the rest of 2014. Read on for a brief recap and link to each of the above.

Watch This Excellent Video Essay on What David Fincher Doesn’t Do

by     Posted 53 days ago

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Yesterday, I wrapped up my 11-part David Fincher retrospective, and earlier today I posted my review of his new movie, Gone Girl.  I really enjoyed digging into Fincher’s work and writing long-form essays about it.  Video essays are another excellent way of examining a director’s work, and Tony Zhou has created a must-see piece looking at why Fincher is a unique filmmaker and master of his craft.  Good narrative filmmaking is about conveying information, but Zhou is right in that Fincher’s characters pride themselves on learning specific pieces of information.  More importantly, the subtlety in how Fincher conveys information is quite stunning, and this video essay does an excellent job of breaking down the director’s methods.

Hit the jump to watch the video essay.

GONE GIRL Review

by     Posted 53 days ago

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There’s nothing that makes us as emotionally blind as love.  Because we crave is so badly, we’re willing to distort reality and distort others so that they meet our needs.  And when the veil lifts and the truth is exposed, everything breaks apart.  Our emotions can surpass hate.  At least hate is outright rejection.  David Fincher‘s Gone Girl is a vicious, nasty, and bitingly funny look at anti-love.  It’s a dark, twisted, borderline celebration of how deluded people can be in what they demand of others be it morally, emotionally, or truthfully.  Perhaps Fincher’s most cold, pitiless, and acerbic movie to date, Gone Girl is not without its flaws, but even those flaws serve this bitter, captivating, knives-out picture of marriage as a violent crime.

The Work of David Fincher: HOUSE OF CARDS and the Director’s Future

by     Posted 54 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

“I want to see everybody as unhappy as me,” Fincher says jokingly in the making of documentary for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.  For most of his filmography, Fincher has given us cynicism we can understand but as a way of peeking behind the corner to show us some darkness.  Cynicism perseveres because it’s surrounded by what’s seemingly positive.  With House of Cards, Fincher held our hands and we jumped into a world we already knew was wretched, awful, and rotten: Washington politics.  The challenge wasn’t to make audiences detest politicians; the challenge was making it so damned delectable.

Fincher never stopped making commercials or music videos even when his career as a filmmaker took off.  He moved to television with House of Cards but in the 21st century model created by Netflix, and only as something he helped launch as Beau Willimon worked as showrunner.  So other than all being as unhappy as him, what does the future hold for David Fincher?

The Films of David Fincher: THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO

by     Posted 55 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

Up to this point in this series, I’ve mostly sided with Fincher, his decisions, and his thoughts on his movies.  But even by his own metric and intentions, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is almost a complete and utter failure.  I understand why Fincher would feel a kinship with Lisbeth Salander (Rooney Mara), but his reasons for making the movie—the prospect of an R-rated franchise and the relationship between Mikael Blomkvist (Daniel Craig) and Salander—are, respectively, superficial and underdeveloped.  Looking over the making-of documentary and his commentary track, I’m astonished at the gulf between Fincher’s intentions and what the movie presents.

David Fincher Will Direct Every Episode of UTOPIA’s First Season on HBO

by     Posted 56 days ago

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With a new David Fincher film set for release this Friday (the highly anticipated Gone Girl, obviously), talk has turned to what the filmmaker will do next.  There was a significant wait between The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Gone Girl, as Fincher was developing his 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea remake at Disney for some time before the project floundered.  More recently, Fincher flirted with possibly reteaming with Aaron Sorkin on Sony’s Steve Jobs biopic, but he walked when Sony was unwilling to give him the kind of creative control he was insisting upon (no doubt still sour from the contentious Dragon Tattoo production).  He also even took a meeting on Star Wars, but turned it down.

Fincher recently said that he will be focusing on his HBO series Utopia for all of 2015, and now we know why: the filmmaker has revealed that he intends to direct every episode of the show’s first season.  More after the jump.

The Films of David Fincher: THE SOCIAL NETWORK

by     Posted 56 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

If The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is a director and a screenwriter working at cross-purposes, then The Social Network are the two sides working in perfect harmony.  Fincher’s cold, austere tone was energized by Aaron Sorkin‘s fast-paced, witty dialogue, and Sorkin’s grandiloquent verbiage was grounded by Fincher’s realism.  In some ways, the movie is highly stylized and yet it’s indisputably honest when it comes to the characters, stakes, environment, and tension of the story.  The facts may be in dispute, but this much is true: The Social Network is one of the defining works of the 21st century.

New GONE GIRL Clip: Ben Affleck is Brought in for Questioning

by     Posted 56 days ago

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I should know my own blood type, right?  Thanks to this new Gone Girl clip, I might actually look into that.  David Fincher’s latest is just days away from its October 3rd wide release, so we’ve got promotional material pouring in.  In this latest clip from the film, Ben Affleck’s Nick Dunne doesn’t know if his wife’s got friends, he doesn’t know what she does during the day and he doesn’t know her blood type either, and the cops (Patrick Fugit and Kim Dickens) interrogating him aren’t happy about it.

Gone Girl just had its world premiere at the New York Film Festival Friday night and soon thereafter, the web was flooded with high praise so this one really might live up to all the hype.  Hit the jump to check out that new Gone Girl clip.  The film also stars Rosamund PikeTyler PerryCarrie CoonScoot McNairyMissi PyleCasey WilsonEmily Ratajkowski and Neil Patrick Harris.

David Fincher Met for STAR WARS: EPISODE VII; Explains Why He Turned It Down

by     Posted 56 days ago

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With the upcoming release of David Fincher‘s Gone Girl this Friday, the director has been making the press rounds.  Naturally, he was asked about Star Wars because you can ask any director about it, and he said he did have a meeting with producer Kathleen Kennedy about helming Star Wars: Episode VII.  Before you get too excited, keep in mind that the producers likely cast a very wide net, and just because Fincher had a conversation about the movie, that doesn’t mean he got anywhere close to doing it.

In fact, he explained why he turned it down as well as his interesting take on A New Hope and The Empire Strikes Back.  Hit the jump for what he had to say.

The Films of David Fincher: THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON

by     Posted 57 days ago

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[With the upcoming release of his new film Gone Girl, I’m taking a look back at the work of director David Fincher.  These articles contain spoilers.]

Across his filmography, David Fincher’s work has been noted as dark, foreboding, chilly, cynical, cutting, and irreverent.  The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is a striking anomaly in his filmography as the allure of the project makes some sense, but the execution is a lush, unabashed romance bubbling with mawkish sentiment.  The movie is graceful, beautiful, poetic, and yet oddly distant.  The whole production feels gilded as Fincher made a deeply moving film out of a fairly terrible script.  The most curious thing about The Curious Case of Benjamin Button is how it manages to be a tearjerker despite its craven desire to elicit emotion from a director who rejects sentimentality.

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