2012 Oscar-Nominated Animated Shorts Review

by     Posted 1 year, 188 days ago

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I adore animation, and it bums me out that most animated features are so formulaic and safe.  I understand that they have to be widely-appealing due to the high production costs, but it keeps the animated form mostly constrained to family films.  The Oscar-nominated animated shorts allow us to have a peek at an animated world that can break boundaries, and show us the potential of the medium when it doesn’t have to appeal to all ages.  Unfortunately, most of these nominees are fairly safe, although it seems like they were all required to avoid dialogue.  The majority of the shorts are still entertaining, but there’s a runaway winner in the pack.

Hit the jump for my reviews of the 2012 Oscar-nominated animated short films: Paperman, Fresh Guacamole, Head over Heels, Adam and Dog, and Maggie Simpson in “The Longest Daycare”.

Disney Releases John Kahrs’ Amazing Animated Short Film, PAPERMAN

by     Posted 1 year, 203 days ago

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The best animated film I saw this year wasn’t feature length.  It was John Kahrs‘ short film, Paperman.  The short follows the story of a lonely young man in New York City, whose destiny takes an unexpected turn after a chance meeting with a beautiful woman on his morning commute. Convinced the girl of his dreams is gone forever, he gets a second chance when he spots her in a skyscraper window across the avenue from his office, and sets out to get her attention.  Using a revolutionary technique of blending 2D and 3D, Paperman isn’t only gorgeous, but it’s also hopelessly romantic.  I felt bad for Wreck-It Ralph since it had to follow this short.  Disney has now posted Paperman online, and while it’s only 2D, you need to take the 6 minutes and 34 seconds to watch it right now.  It will make your day.

Hit the jump to watch Paperman, which is nominated for Best Animated Short Film.

Director John Kahrs Talks PAPERMAN, How the Idea for the Short Came About, the Lack of Dialogue, Blending Traditional and CG Animation and More

by     Posted 1 year, 290 days ago

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The black-and-white short Paperman, running with the new Disney animated feature Wreck-It Ralph, follows the story of a lonely young man in New York City, whose destiny takes an unexpected turn after a chance meeting with a beautiful woman on his morning commute. Convinced the girl of his dreams is gone forever, he gets a second chance when he spots her in a skyscraper window across the avenue from his office, and sets out to get her attention.

At the press day for Wreck-It Ralph, Paperman director John Kahrs (animation supervisor for Tangled, and an animator on Ratatouille, The Incredibles and Monsters Inc.) talked about how the idea for this short came about, why he decided not to include any dialogue, using a blend of 2D and CG to execute his vision, the biggest challenge in doing a short versus a full-length feature, and his favorite short.  He also talked about the difference between Disney and Pixar animation, what he’s working on now, and whether or not Disney is looking to animate any Marvel properties.  Check out what he had to say after the jump.

20 Things to Know about WRECK-IT RALPH and Our Thoughts on John Kahrs’ Innovative New Short, PAPERMAN

by     Posted 2 years, 14 days ago

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Earlier this week Collider was invited to visit Disney’s animation studios to check out almost half-an-hour of footage from its upcoming video game riff, Wreck-It Ralph and chat with the film’s director  Chris Moore and several of the animators.  During the visit, we saw how the film moved from concept to screen and got a peek inside the technical challenges involved in bringing the Ralph’s five wildly different worlds to pixelated life. Hit the jump to find out about Paperman, the innovative new short that will be paired with Ralph, and the top 25 things to know about the feature.

THE INCREDIBLES Blu-ray Review

by     Posted 3 years, 113 days ago

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Pixar likes to take chances, and for them one of the biggest was hiring outside of their staple. Since John Lasseter directed the first Toy Story, the filmmakers have all been with Pixar from the beginning so bringing in Brad Bird was somewhat risky. After all, Bird’s last film was the 1999 bomb The Iron Giant. The film might be a masterpiece, but it was nowhere near successful. But Bird’s The Incredibles worked, and was another in a long line of hits for the studio. It also did things the company hadn’t done before. And now it’s on Blu-ray and looks better than ever. Hit the jump for my review of The Incredibles on Blu-ray.

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