‘The 100’ Cast Tease Season 4’s Political Turmoil, Octavia’s Transformation, and More

     February 1, 2017

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There’s never a slow day in the world of The 100. The consistent battles range from finding sustenance to tenuous relationships between the clans, and humanity will be fighting to survive yet another nuclear annihilation.

With the destruction of the City of Light and many deaths, Polis is in emotional and political turmoil as the season begins. Collider stopped by The 100 set in Vancouver last fall and got the scoop on how the new season begins from Eliza Taylor (Clarke), Bob Morley (Bellamy), Marie Avgeropoulos (Octavia), Richard Harmon (Murphy),and Adina Porter (Indra). For more, check out our review of The 100 Season 4.

On the start of the season premiere, “Echoes”

Taylor: “We’re picking up directly where we left off from. We’ve obviously just discovered that the world’s going to end, again. Which is great [laughs]. Just another day on the ground.”

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Morley: “Not everyone knows about the six months impending doom – only me and Clarke – and that’s the biggest threat in the forefront. Obviously there are still a lot of questions to be answered in Polis and everyone is coming down off the chip high, so there’s the fallout from that. … It definitely affects everyone in completely different ways and people who weren’t on the chip as well. But you’ll see the fallout from that and the emotional scars that are left behind the actions that they did whilst on the chip.”

On the flame

Taylor: “I think for Clarke the flame is still so important to her because she still believes that it’s Lexa. She’s holding on to it as a keepsake and it’s still a very important. It plays a very important role in Grounder spirituality. So her having it certainly– it still holds power, but it don’t do the same stuff as it used to.”

On the political turmoil

Porter: “When you’re allowed to stick with your traditions, you can kind of relax in it, in a way. It’s like, this is the hierarchy, this is who we follow, and as a career warrior, this is what I do. Then, everything gets thrown in our faces because of our commander not being there anymore, and how we traditionally find and believe a new commander will come is being thrown into question. There are folks who want to stick with what we know, and then there are folks who want to trust having to deal with the new circumstances that are coming. We’re breaking up into new camps now. It used to be, I could trust you or not trust you by the costume that you wore. You were on that clan. Now, because everything’s kind of being thrown up into the air, I’ve got to trust you because of the deeds you are doing, not just who you happen to be. It’s kind of like new clans are being created within the clans. It’s kind of freaking scary, because I like tradition.”

On Bellamy and Clarke’s dynamic

Taylor: “They’re a real team and I really like the way their storyline is going. There’s a lot of mutual respect and they’re sharing the leadership role,”

Morley: “They’re obviously going to go on their own journeys and they’re going to have their own issues that they have to deal with and demons they have to fight. But for the most part in the beginning, there is that unity again. But everything that’s peaceful is short-lived on this show.

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Image via The CW

On Octavia’s transformation after Lincoln’s death and killing Pike

Avgeropoulos: “The only way I can really relate it to is like when people use substance abuse or alcohol abuse to deal with things that affected them in bad ways to sort of numb that pain. Octavia does that by executing people and killing them and using that as an out to not feel things. That’s her next drink, that’s her next drug. When she does snap out of that, it’s a pretty awakening moment for Octavia, and allows for some real soul searching and almost grieving again for a second time.”

On Bellamy’s guilt

Morley: “All the decisions he’s made since Season 1 always hang over his head. So it’s just another addition to the amount of guilt and remorse that he has. He’s got a lot of weight on his shoulders and he’s carrying that around, but has to find a way to be useful again and to be helpful to those around him that he loves. … It doesn’t just go away. That’s the great thing about this show, I get to carry around those demons forever.”

On the nuclear secret

Taylor: “It’s something that she has to be really careful about because obviously she’s just taken all these people out of a beautiful city that they were happy and brought them back into a world that’s about to end. So she has to be very careful about how she goes about telling people without starting a riot, basically.”

On dealing with the coming nuclear threat

Morley: “It’s a huge factor throughout this season. It’s this impending doom and we all have to figure out how to address that and whether you decide to find a way to get through it or find solutions to live through it or whether you start making a bucket list and just decide to let it wash over you in a literal sense. There’s that existential dilemma of whether we deserve to survive or whether should we live the rest of our lives hedonistically with whatever we have left. That’s definitely the clock that is ticking throughout the season.

On Murphy’s reaction

Harmon: “I think we’ve seen him be a survivor this entire time. There’s been pretty bad times for him and times when he’s had nothing really to live for and he’s survived anyway just because he doesn’t want to die. I think I can say speaking for him that’s not going to change anytime soon. The guy cares and especially now that he has something to live for in Emori. I think he’s trying to get along with the group a little bit better. I think he’s, now more than ever, finding his place within the 100 team.”

The 100 Season 4 premieres Wednesday, February 1st on The CW.

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