First THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES Poster Reveals a Dragon Standoff

by     Posted 148 days ago

the-hobbit-the-battle-of-the-five-armies-poster

Ahead of the film’s Comic-Con panel this coming Saturday, Warner Bros. has released the first The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies for director Peter Jackson’s concluding installment in his Hobbit trilogy.  This poster officially bills the film as “The Defining Chapter”, as the title tells us we’ll be privy to a pivotal battle that sets the Middle-earth stage for the events of The Lord of the Rings saga.  Though I’ve been a bit disappointed with the Hobbit films themselves, there’s no denying that this debut Battle of the Five Armies poster is pretty swell.  It depicts a fiery standoff between the nefarious dragon Smaug (voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch) and Luke Evans’ Bard the Bowman, and things do not look to be going great in Lake-Town.

Hit the jump to check out the first The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies poster in all its glory, and come back to Collider on Saturday for our full Comic-Con panel recap.  The film opens in theaters on December 17th.

The poster was revealed on The Hobbit Twitter page.

the-hobbit-the-battle-of-the-five-armies-poster

Here’s the official synopsis for The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies:

“The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” brings to an epic conclusion the adventures of Bilbo Baggins, Thorin Oakenshield and the Company of Dwarves. Having reclaimed their homeland from the Dragon Smaug, the Company has unwittingly unleashed a deadly force into the world. Enraged, Smaug rains his fiery wrath down upon the defenseless men, women and children of Lake-town. Obsessed above all else with his reclaimed treasure, Thorin sacrifices friendship and honor to hoard it as Bilbo’s frantic attempts to make him see reason drive the Hobbit towards a desperate and dangerous choice. But there are even greater dangers ahead. Unseen by any but the Wizard Gandalf, the great enemy Sauron has sent forth legions of Orcs in a stealth attack upon the Lonely Mountain. As darkness converges on their escalating conflict, the races of Dwarves, Elves and Men must decide – unite or be destroyed. Bilbo finds himself fighting for his life and the lives of his friends in the epic Battle of the Five Armies, as the future of Middle-earth hangs in the balance.

Click here for all of our The Hobbit coverage.




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  • GrimReaper07

    Poster looks fantastic but I don’t have high hopes for the movie.

    • dolphin558

      I’m sorry to hear that. Thanks for sharing.

      • GrimReaper07

        Thank you. After all, sharing opinions, negative or positive, are the whole point of comment sections.

      • MITIOR

        You guys are the future of internet commenting.

      • GrimReaper07

        I think we’re being passive aggressive though. I detected a bit of sarcasm from his part and I responded with more sarcasm.

      • MITIOR

        I was being sarcastic too.

    • Person

      I understand the pessimism but Jackson does epic battle scenes pretty well, even if this one is bound to look like a video game more than anything. I have a feeling this will end up being a lot like the last Harry Potter movie in style/tone/content, if not in quality.

      • GrimReaper07

        The last movie’s action scenes were pretty bad I thought, except for the ones with Smaug at first

      • Person

        I never really had a problem with any of the action scenes in these movies so far, other than them being too long/CGI-heavy. The barrel sequence may have been a little too “kiddy” but that’s about it, it was still fun to watch.

      • GrimReaper07

        The barrel sequence bothered me in that it was completely inconsistent tonally, like the rest of the movie. Also, I felt like I was watching a Dreamworks movie.

    • http://www.scifihistory.net/ E. Lee Zimmerman

      I’m with you. Methinks all the bloat Peter Jackson lost from his waistline he’s stuffed into his last two pictures; there’s no reason to have any hope for this one.

  • Doug_101

    Nice poster. Where’s “The Hobbit?”

    • Person

      Silly Doug_101, these movies stopped being about the Hobbit at the end of the first movie.

      • Doug_101

        Actually, I thought it was HALFWAY through the first movie.

      • Person

        Eh, I’ll give it the whole movie. The moment that Bilbo and Thorin became friends is when PJ and co. officially made Bilbo a side character in his own story.

      • Stefan Bonomo

        Then you guys will probably be very disappointed in this film. I don’t wanna give any big spoilers, but if they are going to follow the book, which they have been doing up to this point, Bilbo’s gonna have almost nothing to do in the actual Battle of Five Armies.
        Also in the second half of the book, Bilbo really just sat back and watched everything happen. Everything important he did was shown in the film. I don’t have a problem with anything that was changed or added.

      • Person

        I’m aware of the book, but given how much they’ve already changed the storyline, I wouldn’t be surprised if Jackson gave Bilbo a bit more emphasis. At least I hope.

    • blakeavon

      So what? Some of the Lord of the Rings posters didnt have Sauron on them either.

  • ScratStitch

    Defining chapter, eh? Guess that makes this The Definition of Smaug.

  • Erik

    I don’t understand the criticism of these movies at all. What more could you people possibly want? It’s beyond me how entitled people are to there opinions regarding an epic cinematic achievement like this. Everyone’s an expert yet how many of you are artists?

    Opinions are like assholes and the internet is the toilet bowl.

    • http://www.rockydavies.com/ RockyDavies

      I’ve totally loved the movies. I don’t get all the harsh criticism either. And yes, I have read the book. I get it takes liberties, blah, blah, blah. The movies have been great. I can’t wait for this one.

      • dolphin558

        Agree. This.

      • theonering

        For me, it’s not so much that the movies aren’t good. It’s that they’re just sooooo long. The Desolation of Smaug was awesome, but the set piece towards the end when the dwarves were trying to kill Smaug just went on and on and on. Incredible effects with great direction, but PJ has just been given too much liberty with these movies as WB tries to wring as much money as they can out of this franchise.

      • Person

        The movies are ok, they’re just too long. And the effects work is terrible. The first one had Gollum and the second one had Smaug, but aside from those all the VFX look like a videogame. That’s my chief complaint. The movies themselves are mostly fine, just in need of an editor.

      • DEADP00L

        Liberties? They added characters that never existed. It’s not Tolkien anymore it’s FANFICTION brought to the screen.

      • Stefan Bonomo

        I actually like these films better than the book. I’m sorry, I just really like how they took this small standalone story and made it a prequel to The Lord Of The Rings which in my opinion is the only way you can really make this film and make it work. I’m just hoping this film will finally make people see why everything added will make sense.

    • Steven

      I don’t understand it either. Much of it comes from people who love the book and don’t like the changes.

      Taking them on their own merits, they’re superb.

    • Drake

      It’s not that they’re too long, or that there is too much CGI, or that there’s not enough Bilbo (though all those are perfectly valid complaints) – no, the main problem is the lack of drama and emotions. I couldn’t care less about any of the characters … there’s just no emotional attachment. That’s what I expected more of from Jackson, and that’s the main way he has disappointed me.

      • Steven

        If you couldn’t find emotion from the Unexpected Journey, I pity you.

        Gandalf’s speech about Bilbo giving him courage or Bilbo explaining how he will help the dwarves reclaim their homeland. Superb stuff.

        Admittedly a lot of drama is removed as we know Gandalf, Legolas, Bilbo etc will survive because they’re in the LOTR.

      • GrimReaper07

        Those little scenes are ultimately what save Unexpected Journey. It’s still very messy, but occasionally some heart peers through all the CGI and unnecessary action scenes. Desolation of Smaug has absolutely no emotion whatsoever.

      • mbmarquis69

        Those moments are…nice. But speaking as someone who loves the LOTR trilogy (and I’ve never read The Hobbit), I just don’t have as much invested in these new films. I find it difficult to love any of the characters, including the title one. Smaug was a better movie, in my opinion, than Journey but I’m hoping 5 Armies really ties them all together and brings a fair amount of emotional heft. Otherwise, the new films will never be more than simply entertaining for me.

    • GrimReaper07

      You don’t have to be able to make excellent films to criticize those you think are bad. That wouldn’t make any sense. I don’t get how these movie are cinematic achievements either. They’re at most empty entertaining films (though I wouldn’t personally even say that about them). I never expected these movies to be on the level of LOTR, but I didn’t expect them to be as lazy and messy as they are. I somewhat liked the first but I hated the second one.

    • Grendal Sven

      I don’t want to be redundant, so see my reply to Marrissa Evans above ^^^

    • http://www.scifihistory.net/ E. Lee Zimmerman

      If you don’t understand the criticism of these movies then either you’re young OR you haven’t watched them.

    • Travis Gowen

      One Book= 3 movies, bad CGI, absurdly long with minimal action, story telling comes in spurts (which is horrible during a 3 hour movie), and prequels suck. That wraps up most of the criticism.

  • Martin

    American movie posters never lack in subtly.. or may be the general public can’t appreciated nuanced teaser posters.

  • appolox

    Evans vs Cumberbatch. Step right up and place ya bets!!!

  • Marissa Evans

    People have a lot of beef with these movies, and I really don’t get it. I don’t love them myself (though that scene between Bilbo and Gollum is still my favourite of all these Middle Earth movies so far), however I don’t like them any less than the Lord of the Rings films. They’re all equally long, nonsensical, and spectacular. Fantastic, but have a relatable message about small people doing great things. I understand the charm of all of them, even if I don’t get swept into the world like most people do, but don’t see what’s better or worse between them.
    Granted I’m not into the fantasy genre, so I’m not one to compare specific elements like villains, plot points, etc.
    Anyway, kudos to Luke Evans! His career’s going pretty great right now. And that’s a poster I would hang in my living room if I were him.

    • Grendal Sven

      Most of the people who have a beef with these movies are book lovers, who grew up reading Tokein. I personally love these movies as fun adventure tales, but I have to keep forcing myself not make comparisons, because as a book adaption these films fail utterly and miserably. PJ has essentially raped Tolkien’s vision of The Hobbit, added in characters that “don’t belong” and expanded into other elements of the story too dark for a children’s tale, which is what The Hobbit originally was. This story came 1st, and no mention of the 1 ring, or Sauron was ever made.

      • Grayden

        Have they ever actually named Sauron in either film? I thought the closest they got, as in the books, was naming the presence in Dol Guldur the Necromancer.

      • Grayden

        Have they ever actually named Sauron in either film? I thought the closest they got, as in the books, was naming the presence in Dol Guldur the Necromancer.

      • blakeavon

        I grew up reading the Hobbit and have read it more than any other book in the last 45 years. I have no beef with the movies, they are not replacing the book at all. They are simply exploring the same tale through a different medium. They far from rape Tolkien’s source material. (PS its 2014 we dont use that word these days for something as unimportant and as a fanbois beef with a movie)

        It is how the references to the ring that are handled in the movie that is one of its selling features to me. better than pretending it doesnt exist. Of course the references arent written in the book because the Hobbit was first and LoTR came later.

        One thing you are forgetting is that children back then were far more capable of handling darkness and adult themes as we give them credit for now. Ever read Grimm’s Tales a few hundred years earlier and they were WAY worse. Hell even kids who grew up in the 1980′s had darker and more adult themes in their movies, than what appears in the Hobbit films.

      • blakeavon

        I grew up reading the Hobbit and have read it more than any other book in the last 45 years. I have no beef with the movies, they are not replacing the book at all. They are simply exploring the same tale through a different medium. They far from rape Tolkien’s source material. (PS its 2014 we dont use that word these days for something as unimportant and as a fanbois beef with a movie)

        It is how the references to the ring that are handled in the movie that is one of its selling features to me. better than pretending it doesnt exist. Of course the references arent written in the book because the Hobbit was first and LoTR came later.

        One thing you are forgetting is that children back then were far more capable of handling darkness and adult themes as we give them credit for now. Ever read Grimm’s Tales a few hundred years earlier and they were WAY worse. Hell even kids who grew up in the 1980′s had darker and more adult themes in their movies, than what appears in the Hobbit films.

    • d

      I totally agree with all your points, except I do love all the movies. My personal theory is that people have had like 10 years to come up with criticisms for Lord of the Rings. When the original movies came out, there was universal love, and it was like nothing we had ever seen before. But after a decade, I think people got “Lord of the Rings fatigue”. Everyone was now looking at the faults the movies had after so many viewings, and more and more people came out saying they weren’t really that good. I think Clerks 2 really illustrated a lot of peoples points in a comedic way. Anyhow, I feel like if the Hobbit films had come out first, there would be a lot less controversy. But since people feel like they have already seen it before, there is a lot more nitpicking, and a lot of people already decided they were going to have problems, especially since he made it into 3 films.

      • GrimReaper07

        We were angry at the possibility of there being 3 films because we were afraid that Peter Jackson would stretch the story out unnecessarily, which he did. Both Hobbit movies would have benefited from having 40 minutes to an hour cut from them. Also, you can’t honestly think that they are anywhere near as a good as the LOTR movies? Surely the huge difference in quality between both sets of movies is noticeable to everyone?

      • Grayden

        reliance on CGI/lack of “bigatures” is my biggest gripe. Which in all probability had less to do with Jackson himself and more with the studio. I doubt he had the same pre-production time on the Hobbit films as he did with LotR, given that Del Toro backed out leaving Jackson as really the only logical choice to take over. The studio probably had a time frame for release set in stone and didn’t want to shift it back a year just to give Jackson time to build his miniature sets.

      • Grayden

        reliance on CGI/lack of “bigatures” is my biggest gripe. Which in all probability had less to do with Jackson himself and more with the studio. I doubt he had the same pre-production time on the Hobbit films as he did with LotR, given that Del Toro backed out leaving Jackson as really the only logical choice to take over. The studio probably had a time frame for release set in stone and didn’t want to shift it back a year just to give Jackson time to build his miniature sets.

      • blakeavon

        some people are looking to hard to find fault so all they do is find fault, still compared to most other films we are getting lately they are amazingly well thought out. Just the LoTR films set the bar so high it was impossible for them to live up to the hype in our head… not to mention though people were jerks on the internet even back then nothing matches the sheer scale of “hate” for everything that the is web of these days.

        If I was to believe everything I read on the net there has been nothing awesome released in years. That goes with tv, movie, games. People these days choose targets and just heap on like its some sort of sport. See “Watch Dogs” release. Its an mazing game (not without its fails) but if I was to believe what I read it is the most broken, woeful experience in recent years. Um no. The Hobbit is no different, it is cool to hate. LoTR were epic at launch because the cinema world was very different and those films summed up a generation like Star Wars did. Nothign Peter delivered now could ever match that hype in peoples head.

      • GrimReaper07

        The “people hate because its cool to hate” argument is really naive. Most criticisms that have been leveled against The Hobbit films are legitimate. They’re not quite like the Star Wars prequels in terms of how bad they are, but they suffer from a lot of the same problems.

        People who don’t like The Hobbit aren’t “trying hard to find faults” in it. The movies’ faults are completely visible. Bad special effects (in what are very special effects heavy movies), poor characters (only Bilbo, Gandalf and Thorin are noteworthy and the first two barely get anything to do character-wise in the second film), lazy action scenes (the goblin cave uses the exact same sweeping shot countless times and the Smaug scenes go for waaay too long), tonal inconsistency (at times borrowing the heavy tone used in the LOTR then randomly switching to Dreamworks levels of goof), having a ton of unnecessary scenes that add nothing to the movie and make the films around 40 minutes longer than they should be (you can tell it was planned as 2 movies but decided to add what in any other movie would have gone to Blu Ray as deleted scenes) among others.

        I guess The Hobbit films might be fun if you really lower your expectations or just want to switch off your brain at the theater and watch action scenes and special effects but the truth is that they didn’t recapture one bit of what made the original LOTR trilogy so good. The fact that they’re so different wouldn’t be such a big deal if they weren’t such a mess. There’s a couple of great, even fantastic scenes here and there (Gollum, Smaug’s introduction), but they hardly make up for the shoddy filmmaking that fills the rest of the movies. Nobody walked into these movies wanting to dislike them. They disappointed all on their own.

  • Steven

    The poster is superb.

    Anyone who says otherwise can go ”ishkh khakfe andu null”.

  • Chris

    Sick poster, though you have to appreciate the irony in this being a poster for a movie called “The Hobbit”, and having no hobbit in sight on that poster

    • HORSEFLESH

      It’s not “the defining poster”.

  • Chris

    Sick poster, though you have to appreciate the irony in this being a poster for a movie called “The Hobbit”, and having no hobbit in sight on that poster

  • Grendal Sven

    The irony is, even though the story was changed in that the “black arrow” is a bolt fired from a ballista, Bard is standing there with his long bow in his hand, like the scene from the book. While this is an absolutely breathtaking poster, I have to wonder if PJ is trolling the book lovers with it.

    • TrekBeatTK

      I’ve been thinking more and more that the ballista thing is a misdirect and that Bard really will shoot an arrow from a bow like in the book. This image only helps that supposition.

  • Person

    Oh the irony of calling this The Defining Chapter, because I’m pretty sure most of this movie will only comprise about one chapter of the book. And if the poster is to be believed, I guess the movie opens at Comic-Con, not in December.

    But otherwise, it is pretty epic.

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  • Batty Mystic

    I really wanted to like these movies, but they are far too bloated and have way too much (pointless) CGI sequences that go nowhere.

    • Steven

      Yeah those CGI trolls and Stone giants should of been built out of plasticine.

      • Batty Mystic

        I was referring more to the encounter with Smaug, which went on forever. Seemed like they just wanted to show off as much effects as possible- which did look good, but didn’t add anything.

      • Grayden

        Uh, it went on just long enough because that dragon looked amazing. I’d listen to two hours of Cumberbatch voicing Smaug. It just works.

      • Grayden

        Uh, it went on just long enough because that dragon looked amazing. I’d listen to two hours of Cumberbatch voicing Smaug. It just works.

      • mbmarquis69

        I actually enjoyed the Rube Goldberg feel of the Smaug scenes. What I didn’t care for, however, was the endless cutting with stuff going on in Lake Town. I couldn’t care less about Lake Town.

      • Batty Mystic

        I was referring more to the encounter with Smaug, which went on forever. Seemed like they just wanted to show off as much effects as possible- which did look good, but didn’t add anything.

  • http://www.twitter.com/erskine fed23

    “The Defining Chapter” seems to translates to “Give us one more shot” in my mind.

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  • ghdgirl

    I’ll watch this for Cumberbatch’s great voice work as Smaug but can take or leave the rest of it

  • ghdgirl

    I’ll watch this for Cumberbatch’s great voice work as Smaug but can take or leave the rest of it

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