THE WOLF OF WALL STREET Could Be Martin Scorsese’s Longest Film Yet at 179 Minutes; New Images and 3 Posters Released [UPDATED]

     November 25, 2013

wolf-of-wall-street-leonardo-dicaprio-slice

How much capitalist corruption and excess can one film hold?  When the film’s coming from Martin Scorsese, it could be as much as 2 hours and 59 minutes.  We previously reported the runtime on The Wolf of Wall Street was 2 hours and 45 minutes, but France distributor Metropolitan Filmexport tells Allocine [via The Playlist] that the movie runs 179 minutes, which would get it just in under the 3-hour limit usually set by most studios.  Early reports also said the film was NC-17, so even with that material cut, there’s still plenty left for the true story of Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio) raiding Wall Street during the 1990s.

If Allocine is correct, then the movie will be Scorsese’s longest film to date, beating out Casino by one minute.  I would advise against buying the large soft drink.  The Wolf of Wall Street opens December 25th and stars Jonah Hill, Kyle ChandlerMatthew McConaugheyJean DujardinMargot RobbieJon Bernthal, and Rob Reiner.  The Wolf of Wall Street opens on December 25th.  Hit the jump to check out three new posters for the film. [Update: Paramount has also released a batch of new high-resolution images, which are now included after the jump.]

Click for high-resolution via Paramount and IMP Awards.

Here’s the official synopsis for The Wolf of Wall Street:

Revered filmmaker Martin Scorsese directs the story of New York stockbroker Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio).   From the American dream to corporate greed, Belfort goes from penny stocks and righteousness to IPOs and a life of corruption in the late 80s.  Excess success and affluence in his early twenties as founder of the brokerage firm Stratton Oakmont warranted Belfort the title – “The Wolf of Wall Street.”

Money.  Power.  Women.  Drugs.  Temptations were for the taking and the threat of authority was irrelevant.  For Jordan and his wolf pack, modesty was quickly deemed overrated and more was never enough.

 

Latest News

Close