Tim Burton and Timur Bekmambetov Elect ABRAHAM LINCOLN: VAMPIRE HUNTER

by     Posted 4 years, 242 days ago

abraham_lincoln_vampire_hunter_book_cover_01.jpgDirectors Tim Burton and Timur Bekmambetov (Wanted) are re-uniting to produce a film adaptation of Seth Grahame-Smith’s latest novel, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter (the two previous paired to produce Shane Acker’s animated film, 9)  For those who don’t know Grahame-Smith, he wrote Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, which is currently getting the big screen treatment and is set to star Natalie Portman with David O. Russell (Three Kings) directing.  Heat Vision Blog said Grahame-Smith’s novel got Burton and Bekmambetov’s attention in part because of an in-house trailer made to sell the book.

Grahame-Smith clearly has a gimmick of mashing up a period piece with a pop-culture foe (evil robots can’t be far behind for his next novel), and for now that’s working for him.  But gimmicks aren’t stories.  They’re hooks to get you into a story.  Irony is great for t-shirts and bumper stickers, but it’s a slightly more difficult to wink for hundreds of pages. HVB says Vampire Killer, “will give new context to real historical events such as the Civil War and Lincoln’s ascension to the White House. It begins with his mother’s murder when he was still a young boy and his vow of revenge.”  Perhaps the book is worth checking out, but I wouldn’t make a movie out of it simply because the trailer is cheeky.

You can check out the trailer for yourself after the jump along with the official synopsis.

Here’s the official synopsis for Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, which hit bookshelves today:

Indiana, 1818. Moonlight falls through the dense woods that surround a one-room cabin, where a nine-year-old Abraham Lincoln kneels at his suffering mother’s bedside. She’s been stricken with something the old-timers call “Milk Sickness.”

“My baby boy…” she whispers before dying.

Only later will the grieving Abe learn that his mother’s fatal affliction was actually the work of a vampire.

When the truth becomes known to young Lincoln, he writes in his journal, “henceforth my life shall be one of rigorous study and devotion. I shall become a master of mind and body. And this mastery shall have but one purpose…” Gifted with his legendary height, strength, and skill with an ax, Abe sets out on a path of vengeance that will lead him all the way to the White House.

While Abraham Lincoln is widely lauded for saving a Union and freeing millions of slaves, his valiant fight against the forces of the undead has remained in the shadows for hundreds of years. That is, until Seth Grahame-Smith stumbled upon The Secret Journal of Abraham Lincoln, and became the first living person to lay eyes on it in more than 140 years.

Using the journal as his guide and writing in the grand biographical style of Doris Kearns Goodwin and David McCullough, Seth has reconstructed the true life story of our greatest president for the first time-all while revealing the hidden history behind the Civil War and uncovering the role vampires played in the birth, growth, and near-death of our nation.




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  • annawoods04

    These days it has become a common craze of directing and designing a movie from a novel, turning a novel in movie is not a big deal as they have already got the ready made story, now its just the matter of small things like selecting the best actors and actresses which can suit the particular role plays and direct it accordingly.though i haven't read this book so it would be a fun watching this movie.

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  • Corin Prendiville

    Its funny a local rock radio host was talking about this the other day about how he thought it was a film and it turned out to be a book. Personally I think these books are kind of stupid, and they perfectly illustrate how far our culture has degenerated. It may be a bit harsh of a judgment, but I know millions of readers are picking this up instead of something that has backbone and I just don't see a book like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies being recognized as a classic in 100 years. Of course the popularity of such books can only be reflected in the growth of readers out there. It seems like all art forms benefit from tightly knit groups of avid participants; the only one where an exception can be made is film, which is something special about film… yet a lot of really bad films are still made regardless.

    Music scene is a perfect example of an art form that can't handle being overloaded with fans, it almost always destroys a movement or genre, that or the genre began without a soul anyways. Books to some extent are this way, the problem with books being so overwhelmingly read by the masses is that books like Twilight and Harlequin novels are read and discussed before contemporary classics and most people haven't even read a work by an important author from the late 20th century, let alone heard of one.

  • Jon Rez

    “Grahame-Smith clearly has a gimmick of mashing up a period piece with a pop-culture foe (evil robots can’t be far behind for his next novel), and for now that’s working for him.”

    Actually, the idea came from Jason Rekulak, who was surfing the web in August 2008 looking for ideas. Which is right after AICN posted this:
    http://www.aintitcool.com/node/37781

    Coincidence? Maybe. But it is funny a comic book fan just came up with a time period zombie film while surfing the web the same month AICN posted that.

  • Jon Rez

    Just to be clear, I'm talking about the news item about Roanoke on that aintitcool.com link.

  • http://www.3rdillusion.com/ wrecks

    Looks perfect to premiere on Funny or Die, not the theater. As far as the comment of these kind of books being representative of a degenerated culture goes, maybe try reading the Vast library of 20th century trash pulp novels. This is nothing new.

  • Corin Prendiville

    I never said the phenomenon began in the 21st century, which is why I was clear to state that nobody is even aware of the quality books from the mid-to-late 20th century.

    The problem isn't so much that the books exist, but that gimmicks and formula fiction prevails on such a large scale, so much so that literary fiction has been squeezed out of existence. Unless your one of the lucky few to get Oprah to put you in her book club, or for a hollywood exec to adapt your film, or to win a prestigious award, nobody is going to be looking at your work because the synopsis isn't a woman falling in love with a man, or huckleberry finn slaying dragons.

    And that is what is sad, I'm afraid if a modern day Ulysses was released today, it would be lost in obscurity.

  • junierizzle

    I kinda like the idea, but it's all in the execution. This trailer was borderline comical.

  • junierizzle

    I kinda like the idea, but it’s all in the execution. The trailer was a tad comical. Intentional or not? I don’t know.

  • junierizzle

    I kinda like the idea, but it’s all in the execution. The trailer was a tad comical. Intentional or not? I don’t know.

  • junierizzle

    I kinda like the idea, but it’s all in the execution. The trailer was a tad comical. Intentional or not? I don’t know.

  • Jon Rez

    “Grahame-Smith clearly has a gimmick of mashing up a period piece with a pop-culture foe (evil robots can’t be far behind for his next novel), and for now that’s working for him.”

    Actually, the idea came from Jason Rekulak, who was surfing the web in August 2008 looking for ideas. Which is right after AICN posted this:
    http://www.aintitcool.com/node/37781

    Coincidence? Maybe. But it is funny a comic book fan just came up with a time period zombie film while surfing the web the same month AICN posted that.

  • Jon Rez

    Just to be clear, I'm talking about the news item about Roanoke on that aintitcool.com link.

  • http://www.3rdillusion.com/ wrecks

    Looks perfect to premiere on Funny or Die, not the theater. As far as the comment of these kind of books being representative of a degenerated culture goes, maybe try reading the Vast library of 20th century trash pulp novels. This is nothing new.

  • Corin Prendiville

    I never said the phenomenon began in the 21st century, which is why I was clear to state that nobody is even aware of the quality books from the mid-to-late 20th century.

    The problem isn't so much that the books exist, but that gimmicks and formula fiction prevails on such a large scale, so much so that literary fiction has been squeezed out of existence. Unless your one of the lucky few to get Oprah to put you in her book club, or for a hollywood exec to adapt your film, or to win a prestigious award, nobody is going to be looking at your work because the synopsis isn't a woman falling in love with a man, or huckleberry finn slaying dragons.

    And that is what is sad, I'm afraid if a modern day Ulysses was released today, it would be lost in obscurity.

  • junierizzle

    I kinda like the idea, but it's all in the execution. This trailer was borderline comical.

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