Vanessa Redgrave, Rhys Ifans, and David Thewlis Are ANONYMOUS in Roland Emmerich’s Shakespeare Thriller

by     Posted 4 years, 247 days ago

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According to Empire, Vanessa Redgrave, David Thewlis, and Rhys Ifans have been cast in Roland Emmerich’s next film, Anonymous.  Everyone is still wrapping their heads around the movie because it’s a period-piece/political-thriller and the world is not about to be smashed by an inter-galactic space hammer.  Instead, Anonymous, takes on the controversial theory that Shakespeare didn’t write his own plays, and that it was Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, who deserves credit.  Here’s how Emmerich has lined up three of his twelve main characters:

“We have Vanessa Redgrave as Queen Elizabeth; David Thewlis as William Cecil, old and young; and Rhys Ifans as The Earl Of Oxford. It’s a true English cast and I’m really proud of it. There’s 12 main characters and 20 or 30 other characters, and each of the characters is really good.”

I doubt that all of the characters are really re good.  I know that Duke Pudding of Figgy is going to be chatting on his cell phone the whole time.  And then he’ll explode.

Hit the jump for history on how Robert Cecil and Oxford crossed paths as well as Emmerich’s description of the film.

anonymous_edward_de_vere_historical_painting_01.JPGOxford was a poet, playwright, and patron of the arts who fell in with a bad crowd, or rather, not so nice man: Robert Cecil, “the Queen’s secretary of state, a key player in Elizabethan politics and the man widely thought to be the inspiration for Hamlet’s Polonius.”  However, he was not the inspiration for Polonius’ death of getting stabbed through a curtain due to mistaken identity.  The inspiration for that was Spotted Dick, 3rd Baron of Poor-Namingshire.

Here’s how Emmerich describes Anonymous:

“It’s a mix of a lot of things: it’s an historical thriller because it’s about who will succeed Queen Elizabeth and the struggle of the people who want to have a hand in it. It’s the Tudors on one side and the Cecils on the other, and in between [the two] is the Queen. Through that story we tell how the plays written by the Earl of Oxford ended up labeled ‘William Shakespeare’.”

And then we can make a sequel about how Shakespeare professors the world over did not care for this movie.




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  • edboswell

    Why such a numbskull attitude toward the Earl of Oxford? The stabbing of Polonius hiding behind the arras (curtain) could very well be from the murder of an undercook by Oxford when he was 17, most likely because the cook was hiding as a spy for William Cecil, who along with Francis Walsingham, had a spy network to check on the royal wards, and all other royals.

  • helveticaconspiracy

    That's odd. I thought he was basing the film on the Sweet Swan of Avon. The mind blowing Norwegian documentary that makes a strong case for the plays having been written by Francis Bacon and his inner circle. And, in fact, the plays contain several hidden messages in cryptograms. That's only the begining of the mystery and intrigue contained in the incredible documentary. More than enough fact and conspiracy to fill many movies. Why Emmerich would overlook the massive amount of compelling evidence contained in Swan, for this tenuous story is strange. But, cool for me, I can get back to work on my script…

  • edboswell

    Why such a numbskull attitude toward the Earl of Oxford? The stabbing of Polonius hiding behind the arras (curtain) could very well be from the murder of an undercook by Oxford when he was 17, most likely because the cook was hiding as a spy for William Cecil, who along with Francis Walsingham, had a spy network to check on the royal wards, and all other royals.

  • helveticaconspiracy

    That's odd. I thought he was basing the film on the Sweet Swan of Avon. The mind blowing Norwegian documentary that makes a strong case for the plays having been written by Francis Bacon and his inner circle. And, in fact, the plays contain several hidden messages in cryptograms. That's only the begining of the mystery and intrigue contained in the incredible documentary. More than enough fact and conspiracy to fill many movies. Why Emmerich would overlook the massive amount of compelling evidence contained in Swan, for this tenuous story is strange. But, cool for me, I can get back to work on my script…

  • Wjray

    There must be a deficit of information about who wrote the works that fall under the pseudonym Shakespeare. That Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, was a prodigy in languages, history, law, courtly arts, and classics is known. That he distinguished himself at a young age as the White Knight of England, through winning royal jousts, resulting in the nickname Shake-Speare, is known. That he expanded his uncle's (Henry Howard) innovation of the Petrachan sonnet into what is known now as the Shakespearean sonnet is known. That he was renowned in court and in the theater districts alike as the master of poetry and plays is known. That he employed seconds and pseudonyms throughout his career to placate the aristocratic taboo against high born artists is known. That Shakspere of Stratford could not write his name is known. There is plenty of room for dramatic depiction and revelation of the true story of Oxford and his failed attempt to employ his great artistic gifts to educate both Queen and country to the classical virtues, a failure copied ever since in the nation-state. Hence the historic triumph of Machiavellian government and business–which is where we are now, anticipating a good movie about the truth of Shakespeare and his era. Best wishes, William Ray wjray.net

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