Warner Bros. Animation Presentation; Reaction to the New 3D Looney Tunes Shorts

by     Posted 4 years, 21 days ago

On Tuesday morning, Collider was invited to a Warner Bros. Animation presentation on the studio lot, as part of the Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour that kicked off this week.

Held in the Steven J. Ross Theater and hosted by Peter Roth, President of Warner Bros. Television, and Sam Register, Executive Vice President of Creative Affairs for Warner Bros. Animation, the gathered press were shown highlights from current series Batman: The Brave and the Bold and Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated, as well as sneak peeks of their upcoming programs MAD, Young Justice and The Looney Tunes Show.

Following that, we were then given a screening of two of their three new state-of-the-art CG and 3-D theatrical cartoon shorts, each three minutes in length and featuring the iconic characters of Wile E. Coyote and Road Runner. In the films, Wile E. Coyote continues to be left in the dust by his hapless nemesis, Road Runner, always taunting him with his famous “beep-beep.” These cartoons will debut in theaters, attached to upcoming feature film releases from Warner Bros. Pictures.  More after the jump:

After watching both “Coyote Falls” (to be shown with Cats & Dogs: The Revenge of Kitty Galore, opening on July 30th) and “Fur of Flying” (to be shown with Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga-Hoole, opening September 24th), and seeing the full dimensions of the characters and the world they are in, it quickly became clear that stereoscopic 3-D is the perfect way to bring the classic and much-beloved Chuck Jones characters into the 21st century.

“Coyote Falls” sees Wile E. Coyote attempting to entice Road Runner with bird feed, as he bungee jumps off of a highway bridge, ready to capture his prey. He believes it to be a foolproof plan that takes everything into consideration, except for the oncoming traffic.

“Fur of Flying” continues the Coyote’s epic quest as he fashions himself a homemade helicopter helmet and soars through the sky and over the cliffs with a surefire plan to catch the Road Runner. That is, until he ends up in the middle of military testing grounds.

The third film, “Rabid Rider,” which we were not shown, will be shown with Yogi Bear, opening on December 17th.

Having grown up watching the wild and crazy antics of Wile E. Coyote, on his constant quest to capture his nemesis, Road Runner, seeing the CG animation in 3-D was a cool new way to see two of the most well-known animated characters. It certainly piqued my interest and made me wonder if a full-length movie might not be far behind.




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  • IllusionOfLife

    Hmm… I don't know, I'll have to see it for myself before I can properly judge it (which will be hard because I have zero interest in all three of those movie) but I don't like the idea of taking classic traditionally animated characters and making them CG. I have nothing against CG, but as an animation nerd it's sad to me that traditional animation has all but died. I'd be much happier if Warner released a new series of Looney Tunes using traditional animation then converting them to CG. The same thing happened to Mickey Mouse and company and he just hasn't been the same since the move to CG.

    Like Brad Bird says, because of Pixar's success studios have adopted this ridiculous notion that making movies using CG magically makes them better. Pixar has been so successful not because of the fact that they're using CG, but the fact that they tell intelligent, funny, and deeply moving stories. That's what matters with any medium, be it CG, hand drawn, stop motion, live action, etc.

    I think it'd be much more bold for Warner to try to reintroduce the hand drawn Looney Tunes, and honestly, I think more people would be excited. This is a very predictable move and I'm personally disappointed in this.

  • http://twitter.com/Luis_E_Escobar Luis Escobar

    I think the Looney Tunes character's time has long passed. I wish they'd stop trying to repeat their success. It was something that worked well for it's time. The guys that made those cartoons, by the time they hit their peak, had YEARS of experience and tons of Looney Tune cartoons under their belts. I have yet to laugh at any attempt to duplicate the comedic timing those old cartoons had. Especially by newbies who are just trying to imitate what has been done before. The original Looney Tunes creators where inspired by the comedies of the day and the culture they lived in. The new Looney Tunes creators are inspired by previous Looney Tunes which makes them pale mirror images.

    THE SIMPSONS, FUTURAMA and SOUTH PARK are the “Looney Toons” of today. Live with it.

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  • IllusionOfLife

    With few exceptions, that just about sums up what's wrong with Warner Bros. Animation in general.

  • Droncz92

    You know what, why not?

    If this is the studios way of keeping these characters still relevent then great. I'd sure as hell rather my 2 year old watching the likes of Bugs Bunny and that group instead of the crap they feed on Nick or Disney.

    As a father of a kid, a kid still myself(22), and a TV enthusiast.

  • Leonard_abel

    Are you kidding me. Talk about memories. I may just have to see the features just to see the cartoons!

  • Melvin1982

    @Luis

    “THE SIMPSONS, FUTURAMA and SOUTH PARK are the “Looney Toons” of today. Live with it.”

    I kinda find that point to be irrelevant considering Simpsons, Futurama, South Park, Family Guy…etc are more for lets say the 14 on up crowd. Looney Tunes always have been more for the younger kids.

  • http://twitter.com/Luis_E_Escobar Luis Escobar

    Thanks.

  • http://twitter.com/Luis_E_Escobar Luis Escobar

    Buy the DVDs of the originals. They are still as good as ever.

    It will be new to THEM, especially since they don't rerun the cartoons on TV anymore.

  • http://twitter.com/Luis_E_Escobar Luis Escobar

    Last time Warners tried to do Bugs Bunny shorts, they were so bad they didn't even get released. I know because I'm friends with an animator that worked on them. They just weren't funny.

  • Tom

    You don’t know what you are talking about. Disney made Roger Rabbit, not Warner Brothers. WB had characters appear in Roger Rabbit as cameos only, they don’t own or have anything to do with the movie. Conan O’Brien also wrote for Saturday Night Live prior to the Simpsons, big deal he was only on the writing staff for a season before becoming host of Late Night. You don’t have a clue as to what you’re talking about if you think the Simpson’s wasn’t marketed to children during the first 2 seasons. A) Bart Simpson was the star of the show during the first two seasons. B) 90% of the merchandise produced then was for children. Clearly you weren’t around in 1990.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/GHB4QO3563AXBMU6XIZH3C3P24 Aquariasm

    Nope. Looney Tunes of the Movie Theatre ilk were made for adults. As a kid, one doesn't catch the subtle innuendos and adult humor. Mel Blanc, Carl Stalling and Friz Freleng were making cartoons to amuse themselves and their peers. There is a disturbing trend in current popular psychology that relegates animation to the realm of children, no matter its intended audience. As a matter of fact…
    *pulls soapbox out from under a chair*
    One would hope that Warner Brothers is NOT attempting to follow current entertainment media trends by marketing their cartoons solely to children. Because they aren't marketing their cartoons to we adults, are they? If WB is doing what it looks like they are doing, the writing for the cartoons will be dumbed down and silly in an attempt to tickle children. However, in their defense, WB WAS in on Roger Rabbit and the subsequent cartoons maintained their adult-focused racy edge. I was not there, collider.com, so the jury is still out.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/GHB4QO3563AXBMU6XIZH3C3P24 Aquariasm

    THey also had a hand in Roger Rabbit. Live with THAT.

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/GHB4QO3563AXBMU6XIZH3C3P24 Aquariasm

    If they do it right, it could be VERY funny. 3D elicits much more visceral responses from audience members and the introduction of usage of space between an audience member and the movie screen as a platform for comedy opens the door wide open again, doesn't it?

  • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/GHB4QO3563AXBMU6XIZH3C3P24 Aquariasm

    And finally, the reason why the old school Looney Tunes were funny is because the writers/vocalists/composers gave credit to the audience for shared intelligence. Their target was NOT children but their contemporaries. Prior to the early 80s, media companies were not the wholesale childhood-rapers of today. The film industry's primary target audience were grown ups – the same audience as that of the Simpsons, Family Guy and South Park. Many writers of the afore-mentioned shows are “newbies.” Seth McFarlane was certainly that when he struck gold w/ Family Guy, Conan O'brien wrote back in the day for the Simpsons before he was CoCo, Matt Groening was a lucky break animator on the Tracey Ullman Show before the Simpsons were picked up. But none of the afore-mentioned shows' target audience was EVER children. Warner Brothers failed because they were trying to make cartoons for children; however, they did see stars with Roger Rabbit. And Baby Herman who had the lust of a 50 year old and the dinky of a 3 yr old…

    • Tom

      You don’t know what you are talking about. Disney made Roger Rabbit, not Warner Brothers. WB had characters appear in Roger Rabbit as cameos only, they don’t own or have anything to do with the movie. Conan O’Brien also wrote for Saturday Night Live prior to the Simpsons, big deal he was only on the writing staff for a season before becoming host of Late Night. You don’t have a clue as to what you’re talking about if you think the Simpson’s wasn’t marketed to children during the first 2 seasons. A) Bart Simpson was the star of the show during the first two seasons. B) 90% of the merchandise produced then was for children. Clearly you weren’t around in 1990.

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  • IllusionOfLife

    Umm… Roger Rabbit, Baby Herman, and Jessica Rabbit were primarily creations of Disney (even though they're co-owned by Amblin) Warner Bros. had almost nothing to do with the development of Who Framed Roger Rabbit; licensing some characters to the cause and picking up the paycheck with their percentage is about the extent of the involvement they had.

  • IllusionOfLife

    Ahem… NO, they didn't. Read the development section of this article:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Who_Framed_Roger_R

    “Warner Bros. and the various other companies were not involved or participated in the production of Roger Rabbit.”

  • IllusionOfLife

    I'm not trying to ride you, I just want to make it clear to anyone just tuning in that Warner Bros. had nothing to do with Who Framed Roger Rabbit and the subsequent short films other than licensing their characters to the feature.

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