Weekend Box Office: THINK LIKE A MAN TOO on Top with $30 Million; JERSEY BOYS Remains in Fourth

by     Posted 181 days ago

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Not much changed between Friday night and Sunday morning, at least in terms of box office position.  Sony is still on top with Think Like A Man Too, the sequel to 2012’s surprise hit.  The studio can also claim the second spot on the chart courtesy of 22 Jump Street, which held remarkably well considering its outsized debut last weekend.  How To Train Your Dragon 2 did not hold up quite as well, though it did stay ahead of new comer Jersey Boys.  Given the more modest expectations for director Clint Eastwood’s musical adaptation, however, that hardly counts as a victory for the DreamWorks sequel.

Title Weekend Total
1.  Think Like A Man Too $30,000,000 $30
2.  22 Jump Street $29,000,000 $111.4
3.  How to Train Your Dragon 2 $25,300,000 $95.1
4.  Jersey Boys $13,520,000 $13.5
5.  Maleficent $13,012,000 $185.9
6.  Edge of Tomorrow $10,340,000 $75.5
7.  The Fault in Our Stars $8,600,000 $98.7
8.  X-Men: Days of Future Past $6,200,000 $216.7
9.  Chef $1,845,000 $16.9
10.  Godzilla $1,820,000 $194.9

Full story after the break

think-like-a-man-too-posterUnless you’re Sony Pictures or director Tim Story, there’s nothing too thrilling about this weekend’s box office numbers.  We already told you that Sony holds the two top spots on this weekend’s top ten with the sequels Think Like A Man Too and 22 Jump Street.  For Story, Think Like A Man Too marks his second number one debut of 2014, following January’s Ride Along.  Along with their director, Think Too and Ride Along also share a star in Kevin Hart, so scratch that first sentence: unless you’re Sony, Tim Story or Kevin Hart, there’s nothing too thrilling about this weekend’s box office numbers.

Any lack of enthusiasm this weekend may be attributable to the fact that, at this time last year, the box office hosted two massive debuts in Monsters University and World War Z – plus one very muscular holdover in the form of Man of Steel.  No disrespect to the team behind Think Too, but a sequel that opens lower than its predecessor (and more than 50% behind last year’s second place film) doesn’t leave box office columnists much to work with.

Back in April 2012, the original Think Like A Man debuted with plenty of excitement.  To start, the ensemble comedy knocked The Hunger Games out of first place, ending that film’s remarkable four-week dominance.  Most projections had Think Like A Man earning $15 million on its first weekend.  Instead, the film took in over $12 million on its first day.  Think Like A Man went on to a $33.6 million opening weekend and a $91.5 million domestic total: a windfall for a movie with a $12 million budget.

Much of the credit for Think Like A Man’s success went to co-star Kevin Hart.  The comedian first caught the box office’s attention in September 2011, when his standup feature Laugh at My Pain opened with $1.9 million at just 98 locations.  The movie never made it into the top ten but, by the time Think Like A Man launched seven months later, the comedian was prominently featured in all marketing materials.

To say that Kevin Hart has become more popular since Think like A Man would be an understatement.  In the past year, the comedian has been in five major releases, including a second standup feature, Let Me Explain, which earned over $10 million in its first weekend.  Hart’s most impressive box office success came this January, when Ride Along spent two weeks in first place – though his popularity failed a bit when About Last Night hit two weeks later.  With all that in mind, most expected Think Like A Man Too to open higher than its predecessor, instead of 10% lower.  The sequel also cost at least twice as much as the original, which will make its profit margin slimmer if it matches the first film’s domestic total.  So far, audiences seem to like Think Too more than the critics (A- CinemaScore vs. 22% on Rotten Tomatoes) so we’ll see how it holds up in the next few weeks.

Jersey_Boys_movie_posterThis weekend’s second new release also fared better with audiences than with most reviewers – the audiences that showed up to see it, that is.  Jersey Boys, Warner Bros.’ big screen adaptation of the very successful Broadway musical, earned an estimated $13.5 million from 2,905 locations this weekend.  By comparison, Think Like A Man Too opened in almost 700 fewer locations but earned more than twice as much.  To be fair, Jersey Boys was never expected to challenge Think Too for first place.  The R-rated drama was projected to open a bit higher ($15 million) but then hold well with those older summer patrons who avoid opening weekends.  Jersey Boys received an A- CinemaScore, so that scenario is still a possibility.  Any hope that the musical will become a summer hit in the Mamma Mia! mode, however, is pretty much lost.

In terms of last weekend’s big sequel showdown, 22 Jump Street retained its lead over How to Train Your Dragon 2 with no apparent trouble.  The comedy crossed the $100 million mark on Saturday and was down just 49% from its big opening last weekend.  Due to the size of that launch (and the age of the film’s target demographic), 22 Jump Street was expected to be down by a higher percentage in its second outing; but, like Neighbors before it, this weekend proves that a likable comedy can have remarkable staying power despite an R-rating.

How to Train Your Dragon 2, on the other hand – what can we say?  After the sequel failed to deliver an opening commensurate with expectations, there was a strong suspicion that its sophomore hold would prove its box office potential.  How to Train 2 ended up falling by 49%, which isn’t bad – it’s just far from exceptional.  In 2010, How to Train Your Dragon was down 33% in its second week, and under 14% the week after that. So far, the sequel has had decent weekday numbers and should pass the $100 million mark by Tuesday. But for a film that was widely expected to be at the top of summer grosses, that remains far from ideal.

If this weekend lacked in box office thrills, next week should make up for it with Transformers: Age of Extinction.  The first three films in the Transformers series were all summer blockbusters: earning a combined total of over $1 billion in North America alone.  The last feature, Transformers: Dark of the Moon, opened with $97.8 million in June of 2011.  Opening on the same weekend three years later, Age of Extinction should come close to that figure.  If it doesn’t, we may have to call 2014’s summer box office season early.

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  • Angela

    Happy to see that Edge of Tomorrow has a shot at reaching the 100 million mark.

    • Saad Khan

      A well deserved blockbuster is ignored by Americans mostly due to the judgement on Tom’s personal life. that’s a pity. it was the best movie of summer so far.

    • Daniel Mitchell

      Yep, it’s still plugging away. Shame that such an excellent film had a tough time getting it’s domestic audience through the doors.

    • milo

      But too bad it cost 178 million. It looks like Cruise just can’t make blockbusters any more unless they are sequels to his hits.

  • Atlasshruggedmyass

    Looks like that condescending overachiever “Jeffrey Katzenberg” is gonna have to
    Scrap plans on doing a 4th “Dragon” film.

    • Manuel Orozco

      Let’s cross our fingers the Dragons franchise will go out with a bang with the third installment

      • Atlasshruggedmyass

        That’s what I’m hoping. This works a lot better as a trilogy, the only reason Jeffrey Katzenberg wanted to do a fourth is just stricly for money since all his other movies of been flopping the last 3 years.

        I mean seriously the 4th shrek film was standalone nonsense that had zero to do with the previous films and he really wants do six Kung fu panda movies after the last one underperformed?! He needs to focus on just making great movies instead of his over anxiousness on franchising the fuck out of everything. No wonder he says that film is not a growth Buisness and is so desperate to sell DWA now.

      • Manuel Orozco

        I agree someone better persuade him and after Kung fu panda 3 next Christmas who knows if they’ll have enough story left

      • Manuel Orozco

        By the way Shrek forever after was not great in my opinion plus Rumpelstillskins role in the story was completely disgraceful

  • Angel of Death

    It boggles the mind to think that this is a summer where we’ve had very well received blockbusters do poorly, and terrible movies do well. How is it possible that we live in a society where great movies like Edge of Tomorrow (90% on RT) and How to Train Your Dragon 2 (94%!)–probably one of the best movies of the year–are doing so poorly, while terrible movies like Maleficent (50%)–a movie we’ve literally seen 3 times over with Alice in Wonderland, Oz, Snow White and the Huntsman– and Think Like a Man 2 are doing so well? It really makes me loose faith in the American moviegoer.

    In the case of Dragons 2 (not to be a complete fanboy), it’s particularly upsetting because here was a movie that had everything going for it–good will from a very good first film, stellar reviews from critics and fans who saw it, no competition given the lack of family and animated movies this summer–and yet people aren’t seeing it. Not to be a snob or anything, but in my opinion, its emotional maturity and epic scale action sequences far exceed anything seen in the likes of Frozen, Despicable Me 2, or The Lego Movie, and yet audiences made all 3 of those massive successes. Is it genuinely because mainstream audiences are inept at recognizing good movies from bad, and can’t handle these types of movies? I just don’t understand why it failed so hard, honestly.

    Epic fail, American cinema patrons! Epic fail!

    • Grayden

      Here’s the thing, I personally believe studios need to get away from the “summer” timeframe. Crowding the bulk of what would be considered blockbusters or tent pole films into three or four months of the year is exhausting filmgoers. It’s not even genre fatigue. I love movies and even I don’t want to go to the theaters every week to see a new film. They expect us to go see a film, hopefully more than once, but when you have another film coming out the following week, and the week after that, it’s impossible to keep, up and for a lot of Americans, it hits the bank account too.

      If a studio markets their films properly, they can have a successful run in the fall frame, or even the spring. Holidays are big and typically have a tent pole film or two. I think people would give more films a chance if they weren’t flanked by new films each weekend.

    • Grayden

      Here’s the thing, I personally believe studios need to get away from the “summer” timeframe. Crowding the bulk of what would be considered blockbusters or tent pole films into three or four months of the year is exhausting filmgoers. It’s not even genre fatigue. I love movies and even I don’t want to go to the theaters every week to see a new film. They expect us to go see a film, hopefully more than once, but when you have another film coming out the following week, and the week after that, it’s impossible to keep, up and for a lot of Americans, it hits the bank account too.

      If a studio markets their films properly, they can have a successful run in the fall frame, or even the spring. Holidays are big and typically have a tent pole film or two. I think people would give more films a chance if they weren’t flanked by new films each weekend.

    • milo

      That happens every year. And there are plenty of well reviewed movies that are doing well too. Cap, X-men, Godzilla, even stuff like 22 Jump, Neighbors, and even Fault in our Stars reviewed well and have done well. And you have movies like Million Ways to Die, Jersey Boys that had iffy reviews and didn’t do well, along with Spidey which underperformed.

      Edge of Tomorrow doesn’t really surprise me because of Cruise. Dragon is a surprise, I thought it would be just huge. My only guess is that four years is too long and audiences forgot how good the first was. It’s not like its run is over, it will still make a lot more and be profitable, just not a monster hit. And it’s not like the three animated movies you mentioned had bad reviews (Lego had 96%!).

      Also silly to be mad at american audiences, if anything for the most part movies that are not so great but with a ton of action and effects have tended to not do as well in the USA but make more and more overseas.

      • Angel of Death

        Actually you’re right. I don’t mean to be mad at Uh-mur-cans, per se! We did get a fair amount of good films that did well this year. And no, the 3 animated movies I used as examples were not bad movies by any stretch.

        It just annoys me sometimes that people occasionally would prefer to see movies that really aren’t good, like Maleficent. That will probably make close to $200 mil by the end of its run, while Dragon 2 will probably not come close to the gross of the first. It’s a real pity seeing something like that.

        On the plus side though, you’re right, and so is Grayden. People don’t have the money to go to the movies every weekend. And when they do, a lot of times they have supported good movies. When X-Men is the highest grossing movie of the summer AND one of the best reviewed films of the year, there’s something to be said about that too. Just a shame that they’re not all winners I suppose.

      • Angel of Death

        Actually you’re right. I don’t mean to be mad at Uh-mur-cans, per se! We did get a fair amount of good films that did well this year. And no, the 3 animated movies I used as examples were not bad movies by any stretch.

        It just annoys me sometimes that people occasionally would prefer to see movies that really aren’t good, like Maleficent. That will probably make close to $200 mil by the end of its run, while Dragon 2 will probably not come close to the gross of the first. It’s a real pity seeing something like that.

        On the plus side though, you’re right, and so is Grayden. People don’t have the money to go to the movies every weekend. And when they do, a lot of times they have supported good movies. When X-Men is the highest grossing movie of the summer AND one of the best reviewed films of the year, there’s something to be said about that too. Just a shame that they’re not all winners I suppose.

    • milo

      That happens every year. And there are plenty of well reviewed movies that are doing well too. Cap, X-men, Godzilla, even stuff like 22 Jump, Neighbors, and even Fault in our Stars reviewed well and have done well. And you have movies like Million Ways to Die, Jersey Boys that had iffy reviews and didn’t do well, along with Spidey which underperformed.

      Edge of Tomorrow doesn’t really surprise me because of Cruise. Dragon is a surprise, I thought it would be just huge. My only guess is that four years is too long and audiences forgot how good the first was. It’s not like its run is over, it will still make a lot more and be profitable, just not a monster hit. And it’s not like the three animated movies you mentioned had bad reviews (Lego had 96%!).

      Also silly to be mad at american audiences, if anything for the most part movies that are not so great but with a ton of action and effects have tended to not do as well in the USA but make more and more overseas.

  • Colin Christian

    Dragon was nothing short of amazing,my favorite flick this year so far. It’s no surprise to see the 22 jump st and it’s like do so well,we are living in an Idiocracy after all,the lowest common denominator,fart and jail jokes gunfire,getting shitfaced in fast cars….. Hey,if you are into that,good for you,go and water your plants with Gatorade .

  • Colin Christian

    Dragon was nothing short of amazing,my favorite flick this year so far. It’s no surprise to see the 22 jump st and it’s like do so well,we are living in an Idiocracy after all,the lowest common denominator,fart and jail jokes gunfire,getting shitfaced in fast cars….. Hey,if you are into that,good for you,go and water your plants with Gatorade .

  • milo

    X-Men: Days of Future Past $6,200,000 $216.7

    Not bad for a movie that people wrote off because of the first weekend and the second weekend drop. And 692M worldwide, looks like it will probably pass Spidey and Cap at 710 to become the top worldwide grosser for the year.

    Didn’t someone predict 195M total domestic? How’s that working out for you?

  • kw

    Funny as hell to me that just because a movie is released primarily aimed at black people, they flock to the theater every single time. Ride Along, Think Like A Man, Tyler Perry’s Recycled Crap, etc. Just because there are black people in it, they will be there. Terrible movies.

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