We Sorted the ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Characters into Hogwarts Houses

Avengers: Infinity War is clearly the biggest movie Marvel Studios has ever made. The “culmination event” brings together nearly every character from the Marvel Cinematic Universe into one movie, as they face their biggest threat: Thanos. The sheer amount of actors in this film is staggering, but one of the most exciting aspects for fans is seeing these characters interact with one another. They all have their own personalities and quirks, and some will no doubt get along better than others.

So given that we here at Collider are big fans of the Marvel Studios universe and all things Harry Potter related, we figured we should sort the film’s main superheroes into their respective Hogwarts houses. You know, as one does. We did this for Captain America: Civil War once before, but now the Guardians of the Galaxy, the Black Panther characters, and Thor and Hulk are joining the ensemble, so even more sorting must be done.

The Hogwarts houses of J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter universe signify the diverse personalities of those that land in either Gryffindor, Slytherin, Ravenclaw, or Hufflepuff, and to be honest the characters of the Marvel Cinematic Unvierse fit into their respective houses quite well.

So, without further ado, we offer the complete and official Hogwarts sortings for every major character in Avengers: Infinity War.

Iron Man

Image via Marvel

House: Slytherin

Just to show that all Slytherins aren’t inherently bad, but Tony Stark’s ambition and ego know no boundaries.  They come from a deeply flawed place, but it’s charming all the same.  Additionally, his resourcefulness makes him an ideal candidate for the house of Salazar Slytherin.  The only thing that might keep him out is that he probably wouldn’t buy into any of the “pureblood” nonsense. – Matt Goldberg

Black Widow

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House: Ravenclaw

While Natasha Romanov could easily go into Slytherin with her level of cunning, really what a spy needs, especially one who works undercover like she does, is wit, a signature trait of any good Ravenclaw.  You also need to study up on your targets, figure your way out of sticky situations, and work the intelligence gathering community.  Again, it’s close, but I’m sorting Black Widow into Ravenclaw. – Matt Goldberg

Captain America

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House: Gryffindor

Steve Rogers would go into Gryffindor before the Sorting Hat even touched his golden hair.  He epitomizes bravery, courage, and goodness.  While some may say his kindness, devotion to justice, and loyalty could make him a strong candidate for Hufflepuff, his chivalry and nerve just make him too perfect for the red-and-gold house. – Matt Goldberg

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Spider-Man

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House: Ravenclaw

While Civil War first briefly introduced audiences to the new iteration of Peter Parker (as played by Tom Holland), we fell head over heels for the character in the delightful Spider-Man: Homecoming. He possesses a bit of the freewheeling ambition of a Gryffindor, but ultimately Parker’s personality is much more knowledge-based, thus Ravenclaw is the perfect fit. Science is his forte, and while he’s definitely a teenager, this kid’s got the smarts to pull off becoming a superhero before he can legally drink. – Adam Chitwood

Bruce Banner

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House: Ravenclaw

While one could maybe make the case that Bruce Banner and Hulk belong in the same house, we think differently. Bruce is the brains of the operation, approaching every situation from a very analytical point of view. But he lacks the bravery of Hulk—it’s only after he Hulks out that he’s able to do some of the more dangerous things he knows are necessary, but which cause him great anxiety and fear. – Adam Chitwood

Hulk

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House: Gryffindor

But when Bruce does Hulk out, he’s a full-on Gryffindor. He’ll scale buildings, run into incoming fire, and smash all the day long if it means saving people he cares about. Although Hulk isn’t without his temper tantrums—just ask Loki. – Adam Chitwood

Scarlet Witch

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House: Slytherin

Though Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen) is an Avenger now, she has a checkered past that feels rather Slytherin in nature. She embodies all the best Slytherin traits: cunning, resourcefulness, ambition, and especially fraternity (of course). With Magneto as her father — even though she wasn’t born a mutant — her heritage and inclusion in the Brotherhood of Evil Mutants would surely appeal to the House. And while what we saw of her briefly during Avengers: Age of Ultron may lead to more a middling Ravenclaw-esque classification, her use of Chaos Magic and being responsible for what is known as “M-Day” in the comics (when she decided to end the mutant genome and reset reality) seems to seal her serpentine sorting. — Allison Keene

Thor

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House: Gryffindor

The process of elimination works better here than any single quality in Thor. Yes, he’s brave, honest, and trustworthy, but it’s hard to see him in the other houses. He doesn’t have quite the amount of empathy a Hufflepuff needs, he’s not particularly clever, and it’s hard to say someone who turned down a throne is as ambitious as a Slytherin. Gryffindor is the house for Odinson. – Matt Goldberg

Falcon

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House: Gryffindor

There’s little room for argument here. Whether you take Sam Wilson’s comic book path that saw him grow up on the streets of Harlem, losing both parents to street violence, or his Marvel Cinematic Universe version as a former pararescueman of the United States Air Force, there’s no doubt that the Falcon is a courageous and determined individual. You might be swayed toward thinking that Falcon’s unwavering loyalty to partner Captain America and related sense of fair play would lead the Sorting Hat to place Wilson in Hufflepuff, but he’s made of stronger stuff than that. This is a man who flies through the sky on a rocket-powered wingsuit while fighting super-powered individuals without any superhuman powers of his own. That takes real steel. It’s clear that Falcon belongs in Gryffindor. – Dave Trumbore

Hawkeye

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House: Hufflepuff

Oh Hawkeye. This guy is always getting the shaft in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, be it an awkwardly shoehorned introduction in Thor or being reduced to a mind-controlled minion in The Avengers, but we finally got to see shades of Clint Barton’s true colors in Avengers: Age of Ultron, and the dude is definitely a Hufflepuff. Jeremy Renner’s character is loyal to the bone, with an intense dedication to his work even if his outward attitude seems to default to “annoyed” or “bored” most of the time. Shine on, you brooding badger. – Adam Chitwood

Black Panther

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House: Gryffindor

Black Panther is the ultimate Gryffindor, and not just because he assumes the visage of a ferocious jungle cat. The sovereign ruler of Wakanda, Black Panther isn’t just royalty, he is consummately regal; a dignified, honorable and honest champion of justice, who never shies from necessary conflict. While he may bear some trademarks of the other houses — the cunning of Slytherin, the loyalty of Hufflepuff, and the ingenious intellectualism of Ravenclaw — he is above all else, both in his comic tradition and Chadwick Boseman’s scene-stealing portrayal, a fearlessly brave warrior committed to his ideals. — Haleigh Foutch

Okoye

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House: Gryffindor

A badass warrior with a very strong sense of what it right, Okoye could also (in the vein of Cedric Diggory and Nymphadora Tonks) very much be a Hufflepuff. But Okoye is also a little hot-headed, daring, and embodies plenty of Gryffindor traits. You could see her taking the House Cup and Quidditch matches very seriously, and never backing down when challenged by a pesky Slytherin rival. You always want Okoye on your team because she never avoids confrontation, making her a classic Gryffindor. — Allison Keene

M'Baku

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House: Slytherin

While helpful and smart, M’Baku is also always keeping an eye on what’s best for him and his people before the good of the world at large. He’s cunning and not afraid to challenge the establishment, even if that means potentially facing his own death. He’s a Slytherin alright. – Adam Chitwood

Shuri

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House: Ravenclaw

Brilliant but firmly on the side of good, Shuri is absolutely a Ravenclaw. And it’s not just because she’s smart, but because she delights in learning and inventing and experimenting. There’s an argument to be made for Gryffindor here, because she’s also incredibly brave, but ultimately Shuri embodies the best of what Ravenclaw should be: intelligence, creativity, individuality, and acceptance. — Allison Keene

War Machine

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House: Gryffindor

James Rhodes was one of the first characters audiences were introduced to in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, albeit in the form of Terrence Howard, not Don Cheadle. But Cheadle now has three and a half Marvel movies under his belt as the straight-shooting Marine, and there’s really only one clear house choice for Rhodey: Gryffindor. Even when donning the War Machine armor, Rhodey is all about dutifully keeping folks safe, exuding the kind of courage the exemplifies what it means to be a Gryffindor. Rhodey can still cut loose with the best of them, and his BFF is a Slytherin, but the guy is a Gryffindor through and through. – Adam Chitwood

Loki

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House: Slytherin

Ambition, cunning resourcefulness … is there any character that so perfectly sums up the Slytherin ideals as Loki? You can never trust him, and yet, he’s never all bad. But he will do anything to rule Asgard, or Earth, or whatever planet he decides he wants to that day. And while he desires the admiration of the people he seeks to subjugate, it’s always about power rather than earning it from being good (he would also definitely be all about purebloods even though he himself, in an Asgardian sense, is not one). Slytherins also believe firmly in fraternity, and if you don’t know by now that Loki actually does (in his own twisted way) love his brother Thor, well, you’ve missed the best dynamic in the MCU. — Allison Keene

Ant-Man

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House: Hufflepuff

This one’s tricky. In both his comics and movie background, Scott Lang is a criminal. Sure, he may be breaking the law to save his daughter or to expose corporate malfeasance, but his cunning and resourceful subversion of the law suggests he might be a good fit for Slytherin. But when you consider that he’s a well-meaning rogue who believes in a level playing field, it’s hard to put him in amongst actual villains. He’s loyal to his friends and allies, as well as dedicated and patient enough to put himself through quite a bit of bodily harm in order to perfect using the Ant-Man suit. I think you’ll agree that Ant-Man, at heart, is a Hufflepuff. – Dave Trumbore

Vision

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House: Ravenclaw

Of course Vision is a Ravenclaw. What else could he be? A synthetic humanoid spawned from Ultron’s skewed sense of rationality (well, that’s his lineage in the MCU, at least), Vision possesses a wisdom and intelligence that surpasses even his exceptional peers’, and yet he is defined by a humanity that makes him infinitely curious. He’s elegant without haughtiness, intelligent without arrogance, and given his immense power, Vision always seeks to resolve conflict through logic rather than fisticuffs. Played to a tee by the ineffably graceful Paul Bettany, Vision is a creature of mind and measure that would make Rowena proud. – Haleigh Foutch

Doctor Strange

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House: Slytherin

Though Stephen Strange is exceptionally smart and could be considered a candidate for Ravenclaw, his ambition, arrogance, and desire for power put him firmly in Slytherin. Strange doesn’t just want to learn for the sake of learning, he wants to push past the boundaries laid before him at any cost, like in his immediate desire to manipulate time and break the laws of nature despite its potential for destruction. Strange has proved himself willing to sacrifice for others and ally with the Avengers in times of need, but he’s still someone who lets his ego control him. — Allison Keene

Star-Lord

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House: Gryffindor 

Despite his tendency to cut up and crack wise, even in the face of mortal danger, Star-Lord/Peter Quill is at his core an incredibly brave individual. He’d do anything for his friends (aka his family), and while he was somewhat tempted to join his celestial dad’s evildoing, in truth he could never turn his back on the universe at large—even if that meant sacrificing himself in the process. He’s basically Ron Weasley with 45% more confidence. – Adam Chitwood

Gamora

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House: Gryffindor

The daughter of Thanos is no Slytherin. It takes a Gryffindor to forge the independent path that Gamora has, and to stand tall in the face of overwhelming odds against her favor. She’s the Hermione Granger to Star-Lord’s Harry Potter, and just as with that Wizarding World relationship, Star-Lord would be absolutely lost without her. – Adam Chitwood

Groot

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House: Hufflepuff

Sweet Groot, a true friend and loyal companion who is not afraid to sacrifice himself for his friends — is there anything more Hufflepuffian than that? Groot is gracious and beloved, and always ready to help out (or dance while the world burns, either one). — Allison Keene

Drax

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House: Gryffindor

This one is pretty straightforward. He’s brave, he’s loyal, and he’s honest to a fault. It’s hard to see Drax going into any other house, but he fits quite well into Gryffindor even if he might be a bit abrasive to some of its members. – Matt Goldberg

Nebula

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House: Slytherin

There’s a bit of Ravenclaw and maybe even a little Gryffindor in Nebula, but she’s got too much of her adoptive father in her. Her need to dominate, control, and outshine her sister Gamora makes her a good fit for Slytherin. – Matt Goldberg

Mantis

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House: Hufflepuff

Hufflepuffs are defined partly by their desire to help others, and Mantis helped an entire planet when she aided Ego with his sleeping. While there’s also a Gryffindor quality to her when she bravely helped the Guardians of the Galaxy, her kindness and empathy make her an ideal fit for Hufflepuff House. – Matt Goldberg

Rocket Raccoon

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House: Ravenclaw

While Rocket’s temperament may tempt some to put him in Slytherin, you can’t ignore that he’s shockingly clever. From his many prison breaks to how he outwits his enemies, Rocket is always using his mind first before dealing out punishment and revenge (and that’s only because deep down he was so hurt!). – Matt Goldberg

Happy Hogan

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House: Hufflepuff

Happy Hogan is peak Hufflepuff. He’s insanely loyal to a fault, always putting with Tony Stark’s nonsense and handling any and all busywork. But that doesn’t mean Happy is always, well, happy about it. He makes his contempt known, but at the end of the day, he’ll do whatever Tony asks of him. That’s true friendship. – Adam Chitwood

Pepper Potts

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House: Ravenclaw 

Tony Stark’s other half is the brains of the operation, and she keeps Tony in check. Pepper is not just smart, she’s savvy. In many ways she’s Tony’s moral compass; the thing that keeps him from going full-on Draco Malfoy. But as the head of Stark Industries she also has agency and, honestly, would probably soar even higher if it weren’t for Tony. Alas, love always gets in the way. – Adam Chitwood

Thanos

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House: Slytherin

Sorry, Slytherin, but you’re primarily known for being evil. But even if you set the evil thing aside, they’re defined by their ambition, and there’s nothing more ambitious than aiming to wipe out half the universe (unless someone comes along who aims to wipe out 51% or more of the universe). – Matt Goldberg

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